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United Kingdom might not exist in a decade, half of UK citizens think - poll

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11 minutes ago, sanemax said:

Where will the Irish and Scots and Welsh be "going" ?

Will they be going to Australia or somewhere ?

Hopefully ....

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14 minutes ago, rickudon said:

Hopefully ....

Those <deleted> are already here!

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7 hours ago, tebee said:

escaping from the tyrannical clutches of those unelected bureaucrats in Whitehall...

Looks like you missed a page in the brexit handbook, unelected bureaucrats only live in Europe.

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I like this slow, measured but increasing number of comments in the press suggesting that the Union is not a sacred cow. A lot of people still have this weird belief that nothing is more important than the preservation of the UK. This slow drip feeding of counter-suggestions will hopefully ease their minds somewhat, when the inevitable happens. 

 

World View: Welsh are finding it harder to make the case for the Union

"...growing interest among Welsh Labour voters in an independent Wales. Some 40 per cent of them are now “indy-curious” according to a YouGov poll this week, a trend partly driven by Brexit. The poll shows a hugely increased 28 per cent of Welsh voters now support independence..."

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13 hours ago, oldhippy said:

the EU

Perhaps they will but it won't be instant.

 

https://europa.eu/european-union/about-eu/countries_en

 

Joining the EU
Becoming a member of the EU is a complex procedure which does not happen overnight. Once an applicant country meets the conditions for membership, it must implement EU rules and regulations in all areas.

Any country that satisfies the conditions for membership can apply. These conditions are known as the ‘Copenhagen criteria’ and include a free-market economy, a stable democracy and the rule of law, and the acceptance of all EU legislation, including of the euro.

A country wishing to join the EU submits a membership application to the Council, which asks the Commission to assess the applicant’s ability to meet the Copenhagen criteria. If the Commission’s opinion is positive, the Council must then agree upon a negotiating mandate. Negotiations are then formally opened on a subject-by-subject basis.

Due to the huge volume of EU rules and regulations each candidate country must adopt as national law, the negotiations take time to complete. The candidates are supported financially, administratively and technically during this pre-accession period.

 

Joining the EU

Becoming a member of the EU is a complex procedure which does not happen overnight. Once an applicant country meets the conditions for membership, it must implement EU rules and regulations in all areas.

Any country that satisfies the conditions for membership can apply. These conditions are known as the ‘Copenhagen criteria’ and include a free-market economy, a stable democracy and the rule of law, and the acceptance of all EU legislation, including of the euro.

A country wishing to join the EU submits a membership application to the Council, which asks the Commission to assess the applicant’s ability to meet the Copenhagen criteria. If the Commission’s opinion is positive, the Council must then agree upon a negotiating mandate. Negotiations are then formally opened on a subject-by-subject basis.

Due to the huge volume of EU rules and regulations each candidate country must adopt as national law, the negotiations take time to complete. The candidates are supported financially, administratively and technically during this pre-accession period.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_criteria

 

European Union membership criteria
During the negotiations with each candidate country, progress towards meeting the Copenhagen criteria is regularly monitored. On the basis of this, decisions are made as to whether and when a particular country should join, or what actions need to be taken before joining is possible.

The European Union Membership criteria are defined by the three documents:

The 1992 Treaty of Maastricht (Article 49)
The declaration of the June 1993 European Council in Copenhagen, i.e., Copenhagen criteria—describing the general policy in more details
political
economic
legislative
Framework for negotiations with a particular candidate state
specific and detailed conditions
statement stressing that the new member cannot take its place in the Union until it is considered that the EU itself has enough "absorption capacity" for this to happen.
When agreed in 1993, there was no mechanism for ensuring that any country which was already an EU member state was in compliance with these criteria. However, arrangements have now been put in place to police compliance with these criteria, following the "sanctions" imposed against the Austrian government of Wolfgang Schüssel in early 2000 by the other 14 Member States' governments. These arrangements came into effect on 1 February 2003 under the provisions of the Treaty of Nice.

Edited by billd766
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On 11/9/2019 at 4:00 PM, Baerboxer said:

The Irish nationalists are different. They want to leave the UK and join Eire. Only they don't seem to realize the people of Eire might not be keen on that idea let alone all the Unionists in Northern Ireland.

A clear majority of the people of Eire support the reunification of Ireland. The latest opinion poll puts support at 65%.

 

I don't know about Unionists as a separate group but a majority of NI voters (which is what counts) are now in favour of a united Ireland according to recent polls.

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Thornbury has just been skewered by Piers Morgan in yet another car crash interview on GMB 😎

 

(Mincemeat! 🤣)

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On 11/9/2019 at 1:21 PM, billd766 said:

A bit like most empires over the centuries, Roman, Moorish, Mongols, China, Spain, France, Germany, UK, the USA  and the EU at some time in the future.

China was bit of an odd ball in that they never colonized any countries like the rest in your list. Trade and commerce were their main reasons to leave their shores. 

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4 hours ago, billd766 said:

Perhaps they will but it won't be instant.

 

https://europa.eu/european-union/about-eu/countries_en

 

 

But there is nothing to stop the EU giving them EFTA like associate membership with full customs union  membership instantly

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On 11/8/2019 at 7:57 PM, RuamRudy said:

What is it that so many find sacrosanct about the UK? It doesn't work well for anybody within it, whether they be English, Welsh, Scottish or Northern Irish. I believe that its dissolution would better serve each of the countries within it; keeping it alive because of some romantic notion of a grand period that, if it ever existed, nobody alive can remember, seems madness. 

Is this because you are a fenian?

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17 minutes ago, rott said:

Is this because you are a fenian?

Or maybe it is because I have not been hindered by a nasty, sectarian, backward mentality that causes me to live an unfulfilled and self-limiting life filled with bile and hate. 

 

Edited by RuamRudy
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