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thailandsgreat

how to say "during"

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Hi,

 

I listen to an app. They seem to use "dai" to mean "during", "for" for a time period that has ended, like "we had stayed there for 3 days when we left"

 

And for a time period that has not ended they use maa. "Now we have been here for 3 days"  rao yuu ti-nii maa 3 wan (As I remember)

 

I don't find this in the dictionary. Is it correctly understood?

 

Thanks

 

YKB7Xuz.jpg

 

Edited by thailandsgreat

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Representation of tense in Thai is difficult to get your head around, in fact it is often said that Thai doesn't have tenses. It's certainly true that there is no one-to-one correspondence between English tenses and a Thai equivalent. This article is a good overview of the subject.

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'Muer gee' while or during

'maa' on the end of a sentence is something you've done in the recent past.

'leew' is used for something you've previously done in your life.

Edited by BritManToo

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"ได้" in sentences like these is often referred to as an "aspect marker". Thai has a number of them. This particular marker is used to connote " present and present perfect—action which happened in the past and continues to the present". 

So, "เราไปฮันนีมูนหลังจากเราแต่งงานได้สามวัน" can be analyzed

เรา - we
ไป - went
ฮันนีมูน - on our honeymoon
หลังจาก - after
เรา - we 
แต่งงาน - got married
ได้ - [and that honeymoon lasted for a period of]
สามวัน - three days.

Others might analyze the sentence differently. For a discussion, see "Thai, An Essential Grammar'" David Smyth, section 14.7.5, final sentence, page 196.

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8 minutes ago, DavidHouston said:

"ได้" in sentences like these is often referred to as an "aspect marker". Thai has a number of them. This particular marker is used to connote " present and present perfect—action which happened in the past and continues to the present". 

So, "เราไปฮันนีมูนหลังจากเราแต่งงานได้สามวัน" can be analyzed

เรา - we
ไป - went
ฮันนีมูน - on our honeymoon
หลังจาก - after
เรา - we 
แต่งงาน - got married
ได้ - [and that honeymoon lasted for a period of]
สามวัน - three days.

Others might analyze the sentence differently. For a discussion, see "Thai, An Essential Grammar'" David Smyth, section 14.7.5, final sentence, page 196.

I thought the duration of the honeymoon was not stated?

Edited by thailandsgreat

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30 minutes ago, thailandsgreat said:

I thought the duration of the honeymoon was not stated?

I think you're right. Per the article I linked earlier, ได้ can be thought of as an "achievement particle", so I'd say (แต่งงาน)ได้ refers to the completion of the act of getting married. The translation could be as in your initial post, or "We went on our honeymoon three days after getting married.". 

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David has a three day honeymoon, you have three days before going on honeymoon.
I tend to agree with your interpretation because why mention getting married after honeymoon unless it means a period between marriage and honeymoon. 
So there is a choice: We were able to go on our honeymoon three days after our marriage. 
We went on our three day honeymoon after we were married.  
 

The second could be said เราได้มีฮันนีมูนสามวัน 

Now three new replies,  let’s see what they say. 

 

 

Edited by tgeezer

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Actually, thinking about it, I think thailandsgreat's interpretation is more likely to be correct.  When ได้ functions as an achievement particle, it comes before the clause it is referring to, not after it, so in this sentence ได้ would refer to สามวัน. I'm going to ask a Thai!

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I have been able to have Thais agree with anything because they do not seem to care if it doesn’t concern them. 
. ได้ as a simple verb makes the subject the possessor. เราไปฮันนีมูน .... ได้สามวัน could be read as got three days. 
Also if the main verb is ไป then ได้ could mean able to go. 
It is also possible that someone might say honeymoon after we married in case there were people who did not know what a honeymoon was. เราไปฮันนีมูนได้สามวัน we can go for a three day honeymoon. 
เราได้ไปฮันนีมูนหลังจากแต่งงานแล้วสามวัน 

We went on our honeymoon three days after our marriage. 
Thai is not as precise as I try to make it but to answer the question, ได้ is not the preposition for  as suggested by the OP. 
 

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22 minutes ago, Exploring Thailand said:

Got there in the end!

 

 

image.png.b165819d340d4eb4e50072b76dccd938.png

Thanks. I wonder if it would be possible to chuck in "ได้" before the figure 3 in the very last example by your friend?  🙂

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23 minutes ago, tgeezer said:

I have been able to have Thais agree with anything because they do not seem to care if it doesn’t concern them. 
. ได้ as a simple verb makes the subject the possessor. เราไปฮันนีมูน .... ได้สามวัน could be read as got three days. 
Also if the main verb is ไป then ได้ could mean able to go. 
It is also possible that someone might say honeymoon after we married in case there were people who did not know what a honeymoon was. เราไปฮันนีมูนได้สามวัน we can go for a three day honeymoon. 
เราได้ไปฮันนีมูนหลังจากแต่งงานแล้วสามวัน 

We went on our honeymoon three days after our marriage. 
Thai is not as precise as I try to make it but to answer the question, ได้ is not the preposition for  as suggested by the OP. 
 

If it was a straight "for" it would be in this list, but it isn't, I agree.

SZCCWaD.jpg

Maybe it goes under "receive" like you suggest. The app I listen to has used it a couple of times like in the first post -  before a period of time that already has ended.

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, thailandsgreat said:

If it was a straight "for" it would be in this list, but it isn't, I agree.

SZCCWaD.jpg

Maybe it goes under "receive" like you suggest. The app I listen to has used it a couple of times like in the first post -  before a period of time that already has ended.

 

 

 

I see ได้ as receiving, รับมา หรือ ตกมา , มา shows that the action is in the past. ได้เงิน ได้ลูก  I see it like this before a verb also. ได้กิน ได้ไป If you can imagine a period of time in the same way then ได้สามวัน means three days was the duration of the honeymoon.  From the native speaker’s point of view the question was three days after so  ได้ was not required. 

I notice from your ref. T-L.com that when I used ได้มีฮันนีมูน in my example I should have translated it as We have had a three day honeymoon! 

 

The thing is that when you ask a Thai in English they will simply use Thai with English syntax and we can never be sure that it is how they would frame it. They are getting much better at it as English becomes the dominant language and when grammar was introduced it followed English grammar more than any other, so if one can speak English then one only has to get used to a few surviving idiosyncrasies and you can say what you want to say with ease.  There is a problem in that when Thais revert to Thai we have difficulty fixing the meaning precisely. 

 

This is the reason that I want to know what words mean. แต่งงาน for instance is a verb to marry so in เราแต่งงานกัน กัน is redundant. So you can put it in or leave it out without changing anything. 

 

To “chuck in ได้” somewhere. Why not? If it means something the meaning will be taken up and if it doesn’t you will be told คนไทยไม่พูด and you can leave it out. 

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