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Thailand road carnage: A big problem that is only getting worse

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Thailand road carnage: A big problem that is only getting worse
 
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Picture: Naew Na
 
A leading Thai government national insurance figure has said that the carnage on Thailand's roads is a "big problem for Thai society" and it is only getting worse despite campaigns to address the issue. 
 
Dr Sakchai Kanchanawatana - the secretary of the National Health Security Office -  presented damning statistics for victims of road accidents using funds from the government's social security scheme.
 
Thai visa cautions that these are only a fraction of the actual number of people killed, maimed and injured on the nation's roads. 
 
Dr Sakchai acknowledged that the country was one of the worst in the world when it comes to road accidents and that the World Health Organization has said it is one of the kingdom's biggest problems. 
 
He presented statistics for in-patient care using state insurance for 2015 to 2018.
 
In this period 13,861 were reported dead. Injured amounted to 265,243. Costs to the insurance scheme ran to 6 billion baht. 
 
The figures broke down as follows:
 
2015: Injured: 62,773 Dead: 3,509 Cost 1.3 billion baht
2016:   Injured: 63,981 Dead: 3,486 Cost 1.5 billion baht
2017:  Injured: 67,517 Dead: 3,440 Cost 1.5 billion baht
2018:  Injured: 70,972 Dead: 3,426 Cost 1.6 billion baht
 
In these four years the number of pedestrians injured was 10,672 with 916 being killed. This represents 8.6% of those injured that is the highest for all the stats. 
 
Pedestrians aged 65+ were in the highest fatality bracket with the figure dropping for younger members of society who were involved in collisions. 
 
Of the dead and injured the majority involved motorcyclists. 
 
Of the 265,243 injured 210,963 were motorcyclists. The death toll of 13,861 included 11,177 bikers. 
 
Bicycle deaths were 608 with 28,728 injured. 
 
Most motorcycle deaths and injuries did not involve collisions. Some 135,980 injuries and 4,899 deaths were bikers who came off. 
 
Collisions with other vehicles, trucks and vans caused 63,692 injuries and 4,348 deaths. 
 
Thus coming off a motorcycle represented a 3.6% chance of a fatality while a collision resulted in 6.8% chance of death. 
 
Injuries from those in collisions with trains was 333 - of these 35 died or 10.5%.
 
Provinces that showed a 20% rise during the time period were Bung Kan, Chaiyaphum, Prachinburi, Petchaburi, Trang, Phatthalung, Satun, Patani and Naratiwas. 
 
Showing a 5% down trend were Ubon Ratchathani, Suphanburi and Chainat. 
 
Dr Sakchai told Naew Na that the figures showed that problems on the nation's roads were a big problem for society and were just getting worse. He urged campaigns aimed at encouraging road safety to continue.
 
Thaivisa notes that leading figures in the government such as DPM Prawit Wongsuwan,  have admitted this year that the death toll on Thailand's roads is in excess of 20,000 annually. 
 
Many organisations and activists put the toll at 24,000 to 26,000 per year.
 
Source: Naew Na
 
 
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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2019-11-11
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Dr Sakchai Kanchanawatana - the secretary of the National Health Security Office -  presented damning statistics for victims of road accidents using funds from the government's social security scheme.
 
Thai visa cautions that these are only a fraction of the actual number of people killed, maimed and injured on the nation's roads. 
 
He has used the NHSO for stats
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