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Hong Kong on edge as police fire tear gas at university campus

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Hong Kong on edge as police fire tear gas at university campus

 

2019-11-12T001507Z_1_LYNXMPEFAB00B_RTROPTP_4_HONGKONG-PROTESTS.JPG

Office workers run away from tear gas as they attend a flash mob anti-government protest at the financial Central district in Hong Kong, China, November 11, 2019. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

 

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong riot police fired tear gas at a university campus on Tuesday, a day after a protester was shot and a man set on fire in some of worst violence to rock the Chinese-ruled city in more than five months of anti-government demonstrations.

 

Some railway services were suspended and roads closed across the Asian financial hub for a second day, with long traffic jams building in the morning rush hour.

 

Riot police were deployed at metro stations across the territory and large queues were forming at railway platforms as commuters made their way to work.

 

Universities and schools cancelled classes, with students, teachers and parents on edge a day after police fired tear gas and students hurled petrol bombs on some campuses.

 

More than 260 people were arrested on Monday, police said, bringing the total number to more than 3,000 since the protests escalated in June.

 

The metro station at Sai Wan Ho on eastern Hong Kong island, where a 21-year-old protester was shot on Monday, was among those closed.

 

A water cannon truck was stationed outside government headquarters, where the city's Executive Council was due to hold its weekly meeting.

Hong Kong's embattled leader Carrie Lam said on Monday the violence in the former British colony has exceeded protesters' demands for democracy and demonstrators were now the enemy of the people.

 

Protesters are angry about what they see as police brutality and meddling by Beijing in the freedoms guaranteed under the "one country, two systems" formula put in place when the territory returned to Chinese rule in 1997.

 

China denies interfering and has blamed Western countries for stirring up trouble.

 

(Reporting by Donny Kwok and Anne Marie Roantree; Editing by Clarence Fernandez and Paul Tait)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-11-12

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

Hong Kong's embattled leader Carrie Lam said on Monday the violence in the former British colony has exceeded protesters' demands for democracy and demonstrators were now the enemy of the people.

What an out of touch statement.  Most of the city hates her and the police, not the protesters.  Unlike her, the police know they are disliked, and looking at retirement in China.  They are usually seen in numbers of five or more when roaming the streets.  They are shun at restaurants.   

 

Mike Chinoy was right saying banning Joshua Wong was a bad idea.  It was an opportunity for one country, two systems to show that it could work, and it could have ended the violence. 

 

Lam just has no tact or commonsense. 

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40 minutes ago, Roadman said:

I suggest you review who the city is beginning to hate. The latest mob thug attacks on school kids, the setting alight of citizens who disagree with the thug protesters, the attacking of police with iron bars, the constant out of control rioting is far removed from the peaceful protests of months ago. It is now what it was always going to be when the hardcore backbone of mobs run riot. There is a significant swing occurring against these thugs. 

As much as I support HK protester with their agenda, those violent protesters have seriously gone overboard with their actions, beating up folks who simply wants to get on with their lives, and setting a person on fire...

 

I imagine its only a matter of time before soldiers roll in and a curfew will be imposed. There is no winning, China is too strong and powerful. Hong Kong accounts for less than 3% of Chinas GDP. China can squeeze HK until its last drop of blood.

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I for one am more than a little surprised that forces behind mainland China have been so patient regarding action against the protesters. It won,t be long before the heavy hand appears 😞

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2 hours ago, yellowboat said:

What an out of touch statement.  Most of the city hates her and the police, not the protesters.  Unlike her, the police know they are disliked, and looking at retirement in China.  They are usually seen in numbers of five or more when roaming the streets.  They are shun at restaurants.   

 

Mike Chinoy was right saying banning Joshua Wong was a bad idea.  It was an opportunity for one country, two systems to show that it could work, and it could have ended the violence. 

 

Lam just has no tact or commonsense. 

 

Edited by ncc1701d

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7 hours ago, phantomfiddler said:

I for one am more than a little surprised that forces behind mainland China have been so patient regarding action against the protesters. It won,t be long before the heavy hand appears 😞

Not as easy to murder a few thousand as it was in 1989, everything is filmed these days and stuck straight on the internet. They are not legally allowed to intervene anyway until they take over in 2047. Of course they have been pulling the strings for years and put Lam in charge.

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7 hours ago, mike324 said:

As much as I support HK protester with their agenda, those violent protesters have seriously gone overboard with their actions, beating up folks who simply wants to get on with their lives, and setting a person on fire...

 

I imagine its only a matter of time before soldiers roll in and a curfew will be imposed. There is no winning, China is too strong and powerful. Hong Kong accounts for less than 3% of Chinas GDP. China can squeeze HK until its last drop of blood.

I expect there are plenty of CCP agents stiring up trouble, one could be responsible for setting the bloke on fire. The CCP have taken the hooligan/rioters/western puppet line right from the start and flood the internet with negative coverage of the.protests. Some of the so called journalism on GTGN is laughably crude.

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7 hours ago, phantomfiddler said:

I for one am more than a little surprised that forces behind mainland China have been so patient regarding action against the protesters. It won,t be long before the heavy hand appears 😞

 

24 minutes ago, Orton Rd said:

Not as easy to murder a few thousand as it was in 1989, everything is filmed these days and stuck straight on the internet. They are not legally allowed to intervene anyway until they take over in 2047. Of course they have been pulling the strings for years and put Lam in charge.


Beijing won't take the bait, Beijing won't send in it's own soldiers to remove the rioters. And what does this mean ? The riots/demonstrations will continue. Hong Kong's train stations will continue to be vandalized, shops and banks that were set up by main-land Chinese companies will continue to be vandalized.
Tourist numbers in Hong Kong will continue to be low. Hong Kong's economy is sufferring, and will continue to suffer.

Edited by tonbridgebrit

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They could always stop the protests by meeting the reasonable demands asked for, just have to pick up the phone and tell lam to do it.

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1 minute ago, Orton Rd said:

I expect there are plenty of CCP agents stiring up trouble, one could be responsible for setting the bloke on fire. The CCP have taken the hooligan/rioters/western puppet line right from the start and flood the internet with negative coverage of the.protests. Some of the so called journalism on GTGN is laughably crude.


What, the people who set the bloke on fire were secret agents from Beijing ???
It was deliberately done to make the rioters/demonstraters look bad ??

And the people turning up at train stations and the Underground, trashing and vandalizing the place, are they also people that have been paid by Beijing ? Beijing is paying people to set fires outside the metro stations, it's being done to make the rioters/demonstraters look bad ? And those youngsters wearing black clothing and helmets, with their faces covered in black cloth, tearing bricks from roads, and throwing the bricks, have they been paid by Beijing ? Beijing is paying the youngsters to destroy Hong Kong, because Beijing wants the demonstraters to look bad ??

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I would not put it past them to blacken the protests in such a way to weaken their support and as a pretext to go in. CCP is capable of anything underhand.

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4 minutes ago, Orton Rd said:

They could always stop the protests by meeting the reasonable demands asked for, just have to pick up the phone and tell lam to do it.


The Extradition Bill has already been, near enough, sorted out.

An amnesty for those who have thrown bricks and Molotov cocktails ? An amnesty for those who set fire outside metro stations, and who also go into the metro stations and trash the place ? An amnesty for those who spray graffiti outside banks that are from mainland China, and they also destroy ATM machines ?


An investigation on riot police trying to stop all this vandalism ? The riot police have been pretty restrained so far.

As for Hong Kong becoming independent. That was never part of the deal when Britain handed Hong Kong back in 1997. Freedom of religion, freedom of the media, and other stuff was part of the deal. But independence was certainly not.

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Reported Off topic post removed and responses to it.

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