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Thai restaurants R-Haan, Sorn bag two Michelin Stars

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Thai restaurants R-Haan, Sorn bag two Michelin Stars

By The Nation

 

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Chef Chumpol Jangprai of R-Haan

 

Traditional Thai food restaurant R-Haan and southern food eatery Sorn have both been awarded two Michelin Stars, while Le Normandie, Mezzaluna, and Sühring held onto their two-star awards and 24 other restaurants in Thailand received one star.

 

The awards were announced at a Michelin press conference on Tuesday (November 12) at the launch of the 2020 Michelin Guide for Thailand, featuring award-winning restaurants in Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Phuket and Phang-nga – the third edition of the guide for the country.

 

Both R-Haan and Sorn had received one Michelin Star last year.

 

Twenty restaurants that won one star last year retained their award – Bo.lan, Canvas, Chim by Siam Wisdom, Elements, Gaa, Ginza Sushi Ichi, J’aime by Jean-Michel Loran, Jay Fai, Le Du, Methavalai Sorndaeng, Nahm, Paste, Pru, Ruean Panya, Saawaan, Saneh Jaan, Savelberg, Sra Bua by Kiin Kiin, Suanthip, and Upstairs by Mikkeller.

 

Meanwhile, 94 restaurants bagged the Bib Gourmand award, 27 being new entries comprising eight in Bangkok, 17 in Chiang Mai, and two in Phang-nga.

 

“This year, the 'locavore' movement, or the use of locally sourced ingredients, has become the true stars of Thailand’s foodscape,” international director of the Michelin Guide Gwendal Poullennec said. “The trend indicates Thailand’s rich diversity and high quality of local produce. In addition, we see the glorious rise of traditional Thai cuisine, as – for the first time globally – two traditional Thai restaurants, both promoted from one star, are on the Michelin Guide’s two-star list.”

 

The complete 2019 Michelin Guide for Bangkok, Phuket and Phang-Nga is available on the website https://guide.michelin.com/en

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30378272

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2019-11-12
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Anyone on this forum ever tried any of the restaurants listed? I think alot of us tend to avoid ridiculously priced food. But on the right occasion?

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13 minutes ago, DLock said:

 

I like good food, but I'm not a big fan of fine dining. Some people really enjoy visiting high end restaurants, so this is just my personal preference.

 

...and when I get a 20 inch white plate with a single scallop in the middle as an appetizer, I know it will be a Burger King drive through on the way home....

 

 

I remember when I was living in NYC decades ago, we used to hit some of the hot spots for dining. It was very typical to leave quite hungry, and go out for pizza afterwards. And that was in the US. In Thailand the portions are infinitely smaller. 

 

I recently visited the US. Ordered a meal. This is what I got. In Thailand when I get french fries as a side dish, it is usually seven or eight fries. Here? Is that a real portion of breakfast potatoes, or what? Granted in the US the portions are excessive. But, I would rather be the one to choose that I have had enough to eat!

 

And by the way that sausage is apple chicken sausage. Delicious meal. My wife ordered that 3 lb. tostada. And that plate to her right is a monster portion of frijoles. Two meals for both of us!

 

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Edited by spidermike007
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24 minutes ago, spidermike007 said:

Anyone on this forum ever tried any of the restaurants listed? I think alot of us tend to avoid ridiculously priced food. But on the right occasion?

Bo Lan is good. But I have a problem spending $50 on Thai food in Thailand. I want to say to the chef Sorry dude, it looks nice and all that, but I can buy it on the street for $1.

 

Ya, I know, fresh ingredients, quiet atmosphere vis a vis rats, cats and MCs, urinals instead of isolated corners etc. But it only takes me 15 mins to gobble some fab Pad Krapow and I can pee in hotels.

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17 minutes ago, Nyezhov said:

Bo Lan is good. But I have a problem spending $50 on Thai food in Thailand. I want to say to the chef Sorry dude, it looks nice and all that, but I can buy it on the street for $1.

 

Ya, I know, fresh ingredients, quiet atmosphere vis a vis rats, cats and MCs, urinals instead of isolated corners etc. But it only takes me 15 mins to gobble some fab Pad Krapow and I can pee in hotels.

It's the same in the shangarila sala daeng....hi-so food but the urinoirs are touching eachother and the ceiling is so low that a westerner has to duck. Waiters don't speak a word english but the bill will be many thousands pp. And who likes sashimi lobster anyway?

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21 minutes ago, Nyezhov said:

Bo Lan is good. But I have a problem spending $50 on Thai food in Thailand. I want to say to the chef Sorry dude, it looks nice and all that, but I can buy it on the street for $1.

 

Ya, I know, fresh ingredients, quiet atmosphere vis a vis rats, cats and MCs, urinals instead of isolated corners etc. But it only takes me 15 mins to gobble some fab Pad Krapow and I can pee in hotels.

Yeah i have been to Bo.lan a few times but like others i am not bothered about the prices and would not mind paying to prices. I just never get urge to get dressed up and head out specifically for a dinner at a top restaurant. Am quite happy eating at home or just grabbing a quick bite somewhere around home or wherever i may be.

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I don't get people downplaying this because the style isn't for them. This is an excellent achievement few in the world can ever realize and everyone should be happy they did it. And it should bring a proud smile to even the biggest whiners on thaivisa that a simple 70 year old Thai woman street food vendor received a michelin star. Nicely done to all!

 

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44 minutes ago, canopy said:

I don't get people downplaying this because the style isn't for them. This is an excellent achievement few in the world can ever realize and everyone should be happy they did it. And it should bring a proud smile to even the biggest whiners on thaivisa that a simple 70 year old Thai woman street food vendor received a michelin star. Nicely done to all!

 

What it does is separate the "rif raf" from the hi so. The average person in Thailand, and the average tourist, for that matter, will never imagine paying those  western prices for food here. And.,.that 70 year old Thai woman street vendor charges 800-1000 THB for Tom Yum Goong and 1,000 THB for her crab omelet. Hardly street food prices. For me, my guide is a local hole in the wall, that's crowded and perhaps we have to wait for someone to get up from the plastic chairs before we can order. The food is fresh, well prepared and the final bill is less than 300 THB for the both of us. 

Edited by jaltsc
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1 hour ago, canopy said:

I don't get people downplaying this because the style isn't for them. This is an excellent achievement few in the world can ever realize and everyone should be happy they did it. And it should bring a proud smile to even the biggest whiners on thaivisa that a simple 70 year old Thai woman street food vendor received a michelin star. Nicely done to all!

 

Most of them never had a fine dining experience and or can't really afford it. If you only pick 1 item you might be still hungry, order more food. The pictures of the food shown don't convince me that someone eats that and loves the taste has a fine pallet.

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29 Eateries In Thailand Win Michelin Stars For 2020

 

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SORN and R-HAAN in the Limelight as the First-Ever

 

Traditional Thai Restaurants in the World to Earn a 2-MICHELIN-Star Rating

 

Michelin today announced the winners of MICHELIN Star and Bib Gourmand distinctions; together with the official launch of the third edition of The MICHELIN Guide in Thailand, entitled The MICHELIN Guide Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Phuket & Phang-Nga 2020. Featured in this latest edition are 282 dining and 74 lodging establishments – with a total of 5 two-star, 24 one-star, and 94 Bib Gourmand eateries.

 

Gwendal Poullennec, International Director of MICHELIN Guides, revealed: “This year, the locavore movement, or the use of locally-sourced ingredients, are becoming the true stars of Thailand’s foodscape. The trend indicates Thailand’s rich diversity and high quality of local produce. In addition, we see the glorious rise of traditional Thai cuisine, as – for the first time ever globally – two traditional Thai restaurants, both promoted from one star, are on The MICHELIN Guide’s two-star list.”

 

The 2020 MICHELIN Guide selection welcomes two new additions to the two-star category: R-Haan, where food captures the authentic essence of both regional and royal Thai cuisine, using fresh, high-quality ingredients from all over the country; and Sorn, a restaurant with a focus on long lost recipes and the art of Southern Thai cuisine, using ingredients sustainably sourced from a trusted network of farmers and fishermen, as well as refined and sophisticated cooking techniques. Both restaurants have been promoted from their previous one-star rating. Three two-star restaurants – namely, Le NormandieMezzaluna, and Sühring – have retained their distinction.

 

Of the 24 one-star establishments in this latest edition, Khao, a restaurant offering traditional Thai dishes that pay tribute to locality, is the only one promoted from a MICHELIN Plate to one-star status; while three are completely new entries. These three new entries are: Chef’s Table, a restaurant serving contemporary French menu, using premium quality ingredients, curated by chef from a 3-MICHELIN Star restaurant; 80/20, where its imaginative contemporary Thai cuisine is a result of the perfect fusion between the best local ingredients and internationally refined cooking techniques; and Table 38, a chef’s table restaurant with very limited seating, serving reinterpreted and updated Thai street food and ancient dishes. In addition, it is of note that all previous one-star holders that are still in business, retained their status - including PRU, the only one-star restaurant in Phuket.

 

As for the Bib Gourmand list, a total of 94 establishments are featured, 61 of which are located in Bangkok, 17 in Chiang Mai, 14 in Phuket, and 2 in Phang-Nga. Chiang Mai emerges in its very first year covered by The MICHELIN Guide, with an impressive number of Bib Gourmand eateries. Among them are Ginger Farm Kitchen, a restaurant specializing in Northern Thai food that embraces a farm-to-table concept with most produce coming from its own farm; Huan Soontaree, where authentic fare made with high-quality local ingredients is what makes this place a great dining spot; and Khao Soi Mae Manee, a well-known street food vendor serving the iconic Khao Soi (egg noodles in coconut-based curry broth) for over 30 years.

 

The complete selection of The MICHELIN Guide Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Phuket and Phang-Nga 2020 is available in a bilingual digital edition (Thai and English) on the website guide.michelin.com/th/en from 12 November onwards; and a print version, available at leading bookstores for 650 Baht from 16 November 2019.

 

The 2020 selection at a glance:

·         5 two-star restaurants (2 new)

·         24 one-star restaurants (4 new)

·         94 Bib Gourmand restaurants (27 new)

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4 hours ago, Youlike said:

It's the same in the shangarila sala daeng....hi-so food but the urinoirs are touching eachother and the ceiling is so low that a westerner has to duck. Waiters don't speak a word english but the bill will be many thousands pp. And who likes sashimi lobster anyway?

I love their sashimi lobster. Go there regularly with large groups

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2 hours ago, FritsSikkink said:

Most of them never had a fine dining experience and or can't really afford it. If you only pick 1 item you might be still hungry, order more food. The pictures of the food shown don't convince me that someone eats that and loves the taste has a fine pallet.

If given a choice I almost always opt for the full tasting menu with their wine pairings 

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