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junkofdavid2

Wattage of Refrigerator: Safe to Use This?

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4 hours ago, Tayaout said:

The power calculation Power = Amps x Volts is ok but note :-

 

Measuring AC appliance resistance with a multi meter then using ohms law Current = Voltage/Resistance will not work with inductive loads like refrigerator motors where resistance Z is much more complex. 

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17 minutes ago, maxpower said:

Cor, that takes me back to college days decades ago!

 

Our lecturer taught us to remember the word 'CIVIL' in order to work out the order:

In a capacitive load, 'C', current 'I' leads voltage 'V', but conversely voltage 'V' follows current 'I' in a resistive load 'L'.

 

Also 'CIVIL' is one of the few words composed using Roman numerals: I see it as 104 and 49.

(sorry!)

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3 hours ago, bluesofa said:

Cor, that takes me back to college days decades ago!

 

Our lecturer taught us to remember the word 'CIVIL' in order to work out the order:

In a capacitive load, 'C', current 'I' leads voltage 'V', but conversely voltage 'V' follows current 'I' in a resistive load 'L'.

 

Also 'CIVIL' is one of the few words composed using Roman numerals: I see it as 104 and 49.

(sorry!)

CIVIL reads as 153,  to read as 104 and 49. it would be CIV and  IL and so not a word. 😉 

Edited by sometimewoodworker

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Bleh if you want to be pedantic CIVIL isn't a roman number, as the L MUST come before the V (higher before lower except for subtracting, but then only one letter allowed. max 3 of a kind in a row except M)

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19 hours ago, Crossy said:

Toshino are a reasonably good brand so the chances are that the extension is actually rated somewhere near what it says.

 

But I do note that the flex is 0.75mm2 which would put its continuous rating at about 6A in free air so your 1500W load (about 7A) is going to have it get pretty warm. Don't leave it unattended when the oven is turned on, just the fridge will be fine.

 

Personally, I'd go out and buy some 1.5mm2 3-core flex (good for 16A), a 3-pin plug and a 3-pin traily outlet (I've seen them in 2 and 4 outlet style), then make your own lead to your requirements.

 

 

 

 

The extension states 10A which is higher than 7A... am I missing something? (I'm not an electrical guy)

 

Confused 😕

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3 minutes ago, junkofdavid2 said:

 

The extension states 10A which is higher than 7A... am I missing something? (I'm not an electrical guy)

 

Confused 😕

The 10 amp rating is possibly a bit liberal and the 7 amp is a bit conservative.  Don't worry about it.

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6 minutes ago, junkofdavid2 said:

 

The extension states 10A which is higher than 7A... am I missing something? (I'm not an electrical guy)

 

Confused 😕

Yes you are missing the fact that Crossy’s eyes are like a hawk and he spotted the fact that the cable is using .75mmwire 

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37 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

Yes you are missing the fact that Crossy’s eyes are like a hawk and he spotted the fact that the cable is using .75mmwire 

 

And that the Bangkok Cable website rates that at 6A in free air 

http://www.bangkokcable.com/product/backoffice/file_upload/131004_20-300!500V 70C 60227 IEC 53-3C (GNYE).pdf

 

Pretty well every extension I've looked at with a 10A rating (fuse or breaker) is using undersized cable. For a toaster or kettle (short term loads) it's not much of an issue. But an oven which may be on for extended periods it's really pushing the envelope.

 

It's not going to immediately burst into flames, but check how warm the cable actually gets and don't leave it unattended when the oven is operating. It will probably be OK but it's worth keeping an eye on.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Crossy said:

Is that for 100m of cable?  Wouldn't it be different for 1m?

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48 minutes ago, bankruatsteve said:

Is that for 100m of cable?  Wouldn't it be different for 1m?

Does the length of the cable affect its current rating? I would think not. The length affects the resistance and voltage drop but I’ve never heard that the rating is changed. 
 

As mentioned over driving a cable by a moderate amount for a reasonably short length of time it is on likely to cause damage. 

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23 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

Does the length of the cable affect its current rating? I would think not.

I'm pretty sure it does.  Wait for Crossy.

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