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sirineou

how long will a Video camera run on battery back up

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Ok I am in the US now and will be coming to Thailand in a few months. I gave cameras in my Thai home now, but I wanted to bring a few more with me from the US.

The cameras I wanted to bring will work both 120/240V or usb. and I have this spec as (Power Adapter Output 5V/2000mA) if I was to plug it in to  600VA / 360W

Battery backup in the event of a power outage.  how long will it run on the battery.  Any other comments?

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Yes, stop asking unanswerable questions.

 

It depends on the make of camera, size of battey, how much use, is it digital or tape.

The socket you plug it into is immaterial.

Edited by wgdanson
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1 minute ago, wgdanson said:

Yes, stop asking unanswerable questions.

Yes , what? I am electrically declined, What information am I missing? 

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1 minute ago, sirineou said:

Yes , what? I am electrically declined, What information am I missing? 

Read my edited answer again!

Edited by wgdanson

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5 minutes ago, wgdanson said:

Yes, stop asking unanswerable questions.

 

It depends on the make of camera, size of battey, how much use, is it digital or tape.

The socket you plug it into is immaterial.

The camera will be on all the time. it is digital, I thought that (Output 5V/2000mA ) would indicate the amount of power it would draw. I realise that most of the time it might be on stand by and only activate when it senses motion.  I don't need a precise answer I Need an about so long to so long, answer to determine if it is worth it to have power back up, I realise that the internet would also  be down if there is a power outage. I also have a power back up for my router, 

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What is the capacity of the battery? mA/hr or W/hr.

 

It is this which determines how long the camera will run, it is also this information which is missing.

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 A Lithium battery, is like a Halogen bulb

 - It's right from the Start, a Good'n or it's a Bad'n 

 

I had an identical pair, one lasted hour and a half; the other never more than 19mins.

 

Anyways, it is best to bring batteries with you, as Lithium packs (even more so for Mobile phones) can vary significantly, in physical dimensions. I found this in bangkok, when the shopkeeper proudly said he had one of them, but it totally did not fit, even displaying the same Part Number as my Aussie original one

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27 minutes ago, Crossy said:

What is the capacity of the battery? mA/hr or W/hr.

 

It is this which determines how long the camera will run, it is also this information which is missing.

I could not find the information as stated in your reply. This is what I found at the question and answer section .Does it help? " 9 AH or 9000 mah."

PS: the above inf ( 9 AH or 9000 mah.  ) was for the slightly more expensive unit, the unit I was looking at would be a litle smaller, but I could buy this one if needed, 

Edited by sirineou

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No big deal if we can't figure this out.  I am beginning to learn about this. 

"For instance, a 3000 mAh battery could power a device drawing 100 mA (milliamp) for 30 hours. A device drawing 200 mA would last only 15 hours. "

https://www.ubergizmo.com/what-is/mah-milliamp-hours/

Now what I need to figure out how many milliamps does the camera device draw. 

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Power Adapter Output 5V/2000mA

This is the only power info I could find on the camera. If I understand this correctly, the maximum it would draw would be 2000mA  , so at maximum draw connected to  with a 9000 mah battery it should last 4,5 hrs

Am I understanding this correctly? or am I totally screwed up/

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23 minutes ago, sirineou said:

Am I understanding this correctly?

 

Yup.

 

In reality the camera won't draw the fulll 2000mA and the battery won't be able to supply the full 9,000mA/hr but 3.5 - 4.5 hours would be a decent finger-in-the-air expectation.

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5 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

Yup.

 

In reality the camera won't draw the fulll 2000mA and the battery won't be able to supply the full 9,000mA/hr but 3.5 - 4.5 hours would be a decent finger-in-the-air expectation.

Thank you for that. 

I only needed a ballpark figure. What i want to accomplish is a security system, monitored over the internet, that would not be defeated do to power outage,

 

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You focus on the power consumption of the back up battery for the camera. 

 

The camera is useless without the internet to view it.  So your concern should also include how much "battery power"  is going to be needed for your modem and router.  The camera is probably the lowest power draw since most CCTV cameras take house electrical current and transform it into lower DC voltage, not necessarily true of modems and routers

 

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19 minutes ago, Langsuan Man said:

You focus on the power consumption of the back up battery for the camera. 

 

The camera is useless without the internet to view it.  So your concern should also include how much "battery power"  is going to be needed for your modem and router.  The camera is probably the lowest power draw since most CCTV cameras take house electrical current and transform it into lower DC voltage, not necessarily true of modems and routers

 

I already have an APU for the router, I got tired of waiting for it to reset every time the power flickered. 

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Not sure how much equipment is running when you are not home. (you power off the fridge?, some lights?)

 

It is probably cheaper to think about a whole house UPS. At least it will be easier. You must buy a bigger one as the 600VA you have now (go for at least 3.000VA) and you connect direct after your mean circuitbreaker, Probably with its own outgoing circuitbreaker, what you switch off when you are home, to prevent the UPS has to supply your AC, or other big users. A set up like this is able to supply also a fridge.

You need to ad a contacter what opens between grid and your UPS output in case the grid fails (otherwise your UPS will be supplying the neighbours also).

 

When this is a bad (dangerous) idea, moderator (Crossy) please remove.

 

Arjen.

 

 

Edited by Arjen

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