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Huge cuts in UK State Pensions

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1 minute ago, steve187 said:

not just cutbacks, obesity and diseases more commonly associated with the Victorian era are increasing in the UK. also in the last 15 years there has been an influx of people who haven't had a good health care program before, TB is back in the UK, so is having to increasing the size of maternity units, to cope

Without cutbacks, all the above could have easily been absorbed by the NHS.

 

Keep sucking up the Tory propoganda.

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On 11/16/2019 at 7:18 PM, Jip99 said:


4/5 years ago Thai widows WERE eligible for the £2,000 Bereavement payment, plus payments for children under 18 (even if not fathered by the deceased Brit).

 

It stopped last April.

Bar stewards. Talk about the Grinch who stole Christmas.

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18 hours ago, Orton Rd said:

It would not be 'free' it would cost billions, Thatcher was right, the problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money!

You are absolutely correct about it not being free. Somebody HAS to pay somewhere down the line, whether it is taxpayer paying more, or a government loan that will have to be repaid with interest, the taxpayer and their children once again, and this is only one item that the Labour party has in their manifesto.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There_ain't_no_such_thing_as_a_free_lunch

 

"There ain't no such thing as a free lunch" (alternatively, "There is no such thing as a free lunch" or other variants) is a popular adage communicating the idea that it is impossible to get something for nothing. The acronyms TANSTAAFL, TINSTAAFL, and TNSTAAFL are also used. The phrase was in use by the 1930s, but its first appearance is unknown.[1] The "free lunch" in the saying refers to the 19th-century practice in American bars of offering a "free lunch" in order to entice drinking customers.

 

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7 hours ago, joecoolfrog said:

None of which would have prevented your friend from registering at a GP surgery after which he would have been refered to a consultant if necessary.

You really are something , often stating that ' foreigners ' stroll over to the UK and get benefits thrown at them , yet now insisting that your mate couldn't gain entry to a medical centre. . Doh !

Oh and incidently I live in a London borough so my experience is relevant.

Let's keep things fact based. For a start the fellow I mentioned was not my 'friend' nor my 'mate'.

 

It's hard enough for an existing patient to get to see their GP in some instances let alone for an unregistered one. This fellow had no smart phone and if he did have one or a computer he would never have known how to turn it on making him unable to register or book an appointment on line.

 

"General Practice Waiting Times | GP Patient Survey 2019‎

‎25% of GP Patients Surveyed Couldn't Get An Appointment Until a Week or More Later. 
 
Over 30% of GPs said the average waiting time was between two and three weeks, with only 20% saying the average was less than a week. More than 22% of GPs said that the wait for a routine appointment was more than three weeks, while 6% said that it was longer than four weeks.12 Aug 2019"
 
Where have I stated that ' foreigners ' stroll over to the UK and get benefits thrown at them?
 
And how is the fact that you claim to have experience of living in a London borough relevant to the experiences of the fellow I mentioned when there are 32 London boroughs and around 9 million people living in them. 
 
Let's keep those aspects of the topic in the real world as well.
 
If you don't find my description of what happened to this fellow credible then that's your choice. If you wish in late January I will speak to someone who knew the man concerned better than I did and with his permission will PM you his phone number so you can ring him and he will fill you in on the full details. That's IF he wants and is able to speak with you.
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9 hours ago, DannyCarlton said:

I too have had several life threatening ilnesses ovver the last 15 years and have recieved life saving cutting edge treatment from the NHS. My wife has worked as a community mental health nurse for many years and before that as a general nurse. My daughter is the senior nursing sister in a busy A&E department and here husband is a doctor in A&E. Last year I attended their wedding and a large majority of the guests worked in the NHS. The best man was a GP.

 

15 years ago the NHS was the envy of the world with negligable waiting times and GP practices that provided a wide range of additional services to patients. In the last 10 years, all of this has been lost.

 

At the wedding there was a complete consensus on the reason for this, from a professor down to nursing assistants. Government cutbacks. No other reason. Your reasons don't explain in any way why the dramatic deterioation in NHS services over the last 10 years. Underfunding and bad management by the Tory government do.

 

Sorry it doesn't fit your right wing Tory agenda but it's time to face facts, not Tory spin.

 

 

If you follow my posts it is fairly obvious that I am not right wing , childish to put labels on those you disagree with.

 

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1 hour ago, yogi100 said:

Let's keep things fact based. For a start the fellow I mentioned was not my 'friend' nor my 'mate'.

 

It's hard enough for an existing patient to get to see their GP in some instances let alone for an unregistered one. This fellow had no smart phone and if he did have one or a computer he would never have known how to turn it on making him unable to register or book an appointment on line.

 

"General Practice Waiting Times | GP Patient Survey 2019‎

‎25% of GP Patients Surveyed Couldn't Get An Appointment Until a Week or More Later. 
 
Over 30% of GPs said the average waiting time was between two and three weeks, with only 20% saying the average was less than a week. More than 22% of GPs said that the wait for a routine appointment was more than three weeks, while 6% said that it was longer than four weeks.12 Aug 2019"
 
Where have I stated that ' foreigners ' stroll over to the UK and get benefits thrown at them?
 
And how is the fact that you claim to have experience of living in a London borough relevant to the experiences of the fellow I mentioned when there are 32 London boroughs and around 9 million people living in them. 
 
Let's keep those aspects of the topic in the real world as well.
 
If you don't find my description of what happened to this fellow credible then that's your choice. If you wish in late January I will speak to someone who knew the man concerned better than I did and with his permission will PM you his phone number so you can ring him and he will fill you in on the full details. That's IF he wants and is able to speak with you.

The facts as you state them are only credible if the person involved ,was for some reason , totally incapable of negotiating the system.

If he failed to do some very basic research before leaving Pattaya , or failed to get a friend to help him do so , then frankly he has nobody to blame than himself as the facts stand.

Do people fall through the cracks in the system , yes , just as no nothing tourists get ripped off daily in Thailand if they arrive totally ignorant and unprepared for what awaits them.

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23 hours ago, DannyCarlton said:

But for the vast majority not. Clickbait heading and errant scaremongering.

How vast is the vast majority ? Be interesting to see how many are affected....

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On 11/16/2019 at 8:44 PM, yogi100 said:

The problem is many left nothing behind, they burned their bridges.

 

A fellow I knew returned to the UK with a cancer scare. He'd burned his bridges. He was 67.

 

He was sent to different hostels each day in London which he had to vacate each morning by 9am He was not allowed admittance again till 8pm that evening. He had to walk the streets each day time or sit in libraries, pubs and cafes.

 

He was offered no 'free' treatment, no housing nor welfare benefits. He was already in receipt of a state pension which he'd paid in for all his working life.

 

He went to a hospital and they told him to come back in 10 days time. It was in the middle of winter 2017. He despaired and returned to Pattaya. He slipped off the radar about 3 months later and no one in the UK nor Thailand has seen nor heard from him since. We believe he's now passed away.

The treatment he received was not much different to people who have not been away. He needed an address to get better help. He could get medical help at an AnE and a hospital bed, as required when one became available. He did get the pension he was owed but he WAS NOT OWED anything else. He was homeless so he got the same treatment as single homeless people get. This person did not just burn their bridges but apparently had not bothered to keep in contact with friends or family.

One reason i keep in contact with friends and family, keep a UK address and flat and return once a year is to avoid what happened to your friend happening to me. Its called forward planning

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That's a hard hit to take mate - there's something called the fallacy of induction, just because something being going on OK for years, doesn't mean tomorrow it won't all change. Ask the Aztecs.

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