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Which foreign health insurance companies are accepted for Non-Immigrant Visa “O-A” (Long Stay)

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2 hours ago, sathornlover said:

What about those who enter the second year with R-Entry permit?
Do they only get this permit if they prove a worthless TGIA compulsory insurance?

To my understanding on any subsequent entries on still valid OA you can be stamped in up to the date of your policy. After the original policy used to get your visa (which could have been either foreign or local policy) ends the original visa notation no longer suffice and you will have to show Imm a certificate which must be (as it stands now) one of the "approved" Thai companies.

 

Since most insurers issue only 1 year policy at a time this will usually mean you can only use a foreign policyfor the first year (or even less if policy dates don't match with entry date). However if you were able to get a policy issued for say 2 years at time of initial visa issuance then could use longer.

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3 hours ago, Sheryl said:

Since most insurers issue only 1 year policy at a time this will usually mean you can only use a foreign policyfor the first year (or even less if policy dates don't match with entry date). However if you were able to get a policy issued for say 2 years at time of initial visa issuance then could use longer.

Thank you for your comprehensible explanation! In Germany there are some insurers who insure for more than one year. The HanseMerkur e.g. up to 5 years. 


We will probably not get so much feedback on my question.
The applications for OA should move due to the considerably more difficult conditions since 31.10 in the range of OX, if not more insurers are willing to deliver the required certificate ...

 

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On 11/18/2019 at 7:58 AM, CMBob said:

The Thai Embassy site in the US (consistent with a letter sent out by the US State Department) clearly states that the long-stay health insurance requirement for an O-A visa can be satisfied by coverage from a Thai or foreign insurance company so long as the insurance company signs the form that the required coverage (400 k in-patient, 40k out-patient) has been provided for the stay time period.  You can read the clear requirements (see specifically Sections 8, 8.1, and 8.2) here:  OA Visa Requirements  

 

So, yes, at least in the US (I didn't research other Thai embassies' requirements), a foreign insurer not on the so-called "approved list" is acceptable.  The new long-stay health insurance requirements are rather minimal and I would think (hope?) that the same coverage provided by a foreign insurer would be cheaper than what's being charged by the approved Thai companies.

A little off-topic, but just for the record, I have had BOOOPA in Thailand the past 10 years. B500,000 cover, inpatient only. I pay B72K for that. I recently asked them would it would cost to add B40K in outpatient. No can do. Only B75K provided, and it would add approximately another B50K (!!!!) to my premium.  What a crappy deal! B50K to get a maximum of $B75K.  If they used the same math, it would cost B28K to get B40K in coverage. It's a joke!  In my case it is a double joke as it is highly unlikely I would use outpatient as in the vast majority of cases, I would prefer to get outpatient stuff taken care of by a "doc in the box" rather than having to go to the hospital, wait all day, and inhale everyone's germs!

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On 11/17/2019 at 11:29 PM, stat said:

Main reason for sticking with longstay is that I do not need to do visa runs that take a full day each and cost additional money.

Cheaper than health insurance!

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3 hours ago, ThaiBunny said:

Cheaper than health insurance!

"Cheaper than health insurance!"  So, far.  However, many suspect that the insurance requirement will sooner or later apply to all long-stays.  It is not even a bad idea, in my opinion, so long as the coverage is affordable and realistic.  

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On 12/8/2019 at 7:14 AM, ThaiBunny said:

Cheaper than health insurance!

If you consider 4 days of your lifetime worthless or each day worth 100€ you are certainly right 😀

Visa runs cost time and money...  However if you enjoy traveling it gives a different picture.

Edited by stat

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On 11/29/2019 at 9:24 AM, Sheryl said:

If you have it for 5 years and this is noted by the Embassy on your visa you should be OK for entries under that visa. However if you try to do an incountry extension of stay after the visa has expired, local Imm officers   will require proof of a Thai policy.  You might do better to just return home and apply for a new OA thete and never do incountry extension, at least not until things change.

 

Has anyone ever achieved the above i.e. on reentry got a full 365 days?

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11 hours ago, stat said:

 

Has anyone ever achieved the above i.e. on reentry got a full 365 days?

If you mean has anyone with an OA visa issued after October 31 left and re entered with an insurance notation that showed insurance was still valid for another year I doubt there has been a single case of such an entry. We are still in early days of people making initial entry on OA visa issued after 31 October and very, very few would already have entered, left and re entered.  And very, very few people have insurance policies that expire more than 12 months from date of issuance.

 

Add to this that uptake of new OA visas has likely declined in the wake of the new requirement.

 

If you mean re-entry on an OA visa issued before 31 October but still valid,  yes people have done that and been stamped in for another year.

 

If you mean re-entry on a re-entry permit after an OA visa has  expired,  many have done that and no problem but in that case one does not receive additional time, one is stamped back in through the same time as on the prior stamp.

 

Maybe clarify what exactly you mean.

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8 hours ago, Sheryl said:

If you mean has anyone with an OA visa issued after October 31 left and re entered with an insurance notation that showed insurance was still valid for another year I doubt there has been a single case of such an entry. We are still in early days of people making initial entry on OA visa issued after 31 October and very, very few would already have entered, left and re entered.  And very, very few people have insurance policies that expire more than 12 months from date of issuance.

 

Add to this that uptake of new OA visas has likely declined in the wake of the new requirement.

 

If you mean re-entry on an OA visa issued before 31 October but still valid,  yes people have done that and been stamped in for another year.

 

If you mean re-entry on a re-entry permit after an OA visa has  expired,  many have done that and no problem but in that case one does not receive additional time, one is stamped back in through the same time as on the prior stamp.

 

Maybe clarify what exactly you mean.

Sorry if i expressed myself unclear!

 

I was referring to:

 

OA visa issued after October 31 left and re entered with an insurance notation that showed insurance was still valid for another year.

 

There are companies from which I can buy health insurance with open end or 5 years running time that I can cancel every year. Not sure how immigration/embassy will handle these.

 

I guess you are right not that many will have tried this up to now.

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People have only just begun entering on OAs issued post 31 October and we have had just a few reports on them. None on people entering and alreading leaving and re-entering.

 

It would certainly be advantageous if getting an OA based on foreign insurance (not easy to do but some have succeeded) to have the policy's expiration date go up to one year past the visa expiry as that way you could get the full 2 years out of the OA

 

There is no advantage to having it go past that time as you cannot get an in-country extension of stay based on  a foreign policy,  as things  currently stand. So at that point if wanting to stay in Thailand you would either have to get a local policy or return to your home country for a new visa (or get a different visa type in a neighboring country).

 

Any insurance policy that you pay for yourself has an expiration date equivalent to the time period through which you have alredy paid the premium,   even though lifetime renewal may be guaranteed.

 

 

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15 hours ago, Sheryl said:

People have only just begun entering on OAs issued post 31 October and we have had just a few reports on them. None on people entering and alreading leaving and re-entering.

 

It would certainly be advantageous if getting an OA based on foreign insurance (not easy to do but some have succeeded) to have the policy's expiration date go up to one year past the visa expiry as that way you could get the full 2 years out of the OA

 

There is no advantage to having it go past that time as you cannot get an in-country extension of stay based on  a foreign policy,  as things  currently stand. So at that point if wanting to stay in Thailand you would either have to get a local policy or return to your home country for a new visa (or get a different visa type in a neighboring country).

 

Any insurance policy that you pay for yourself has an expiration date equivalent to the time period through which you have alredy paid the premium,   even though lifetime renewal may be guaranteed.

 

 

Ahem sorry to disagree but in Germany you buy general health insurance with no expiration date and no maximum cover. Usually you pay one month in advance and that's that, no end date specified but you can cancel at any time. Another option for long time travel is insurance up to 5 years and if you cut your travel short you do get your money back. Only limit 5 years cause its travel related.

 

PS: I never understood why the rest of the world buys health insurance with a max cover. If I run up bills like half a million euros for heart surgery or cancer treatment that's when I need my insurance. I myself pay everything under 5000€ myself and only above my health insurance kicks in (About 200€ per month). Under these scenarios the Thai insurances are a complete waste of money IMHO but needed for extension.

Edited by stat
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On 11/29/2019 at 9:43 AM, sathornlover said:

What about those who enter the second year with R-Entry permit?
Do they only get this permit if they prove a worthless TGIA compulsory insurance?

No. Entries on a re-entry permit do not generate a new permission to stay nor any additional time so no requirement. But if after your period of stay ends you seek an in-country extension or go back to your own country for a new OA visa, in both cases insurance will be required. The difference between the 2 being that it must be one of the listed Thai companies for in-country extension whereas you may be able to apply for new visa back home using a foreign policy.

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