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8 minutes ago, Andrew Dwyer said:

Yup , in a can !!

But I seem to remember you boiled the can in water before opening and pouring on the custard, was pretty darn good !!

Can’t imagine microwave getting the same results .

Yes..boiling the can as in the video.

Please don't  believe that the video is a commentary on British cuisine..British pluck and courage more like..

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOr8OtpctpE

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I've been in Isaan for 12 years and I find it fascinating. Virtually every week there is something that I find of interest or something that surprises me, dismays me and sometimes shocks me.  

This story starts 22 years ago.   I first met my future wife, Dee, when she was selling papaya salad (somtam in Thai) on a street stall in Nong Khai. I was forty one and tired of the single

My wife doesn't give them "Jack", and naturally I asked come one day, "honey" why don't you give them something....huh, they have hands and feet and can work, instead of always asking for money on the

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On 11/18/2019 at 8:05 PM, sunnyboy2018 said:

People seem to think of Issan as village life. I have been to Issan many times but never been to a village. Just the towns and cities.

My wife's village is 38km to the nearest 7/11.

 

No stores or restaurants.

 

Quite different from the towns and cities, which is always a relief to get to.

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1 hour ago, Odysseus123 said:

Ha..ha..ha..

 

For some reason or another it changed to "spotted dog" in the colonies.

 

These things do happen as you now..

 

Gawd...in a can?

Well....it's probably like 'Tom Piper' sponge pudding as

in the Scouts I loved the stuff.

 

It's hard to believe that my grandfather lived on this cuisine (bully beef,McConaghey's stew,apple jam and Tom Piper for 3 years..1916-1919.

Spotty dog  - I couldn't eat a whole one:

Museum of London | free museums in London | things to do ...

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On 11/29/2020 at 6:14 PM, owl sees all said:

It's great to see a post from someone that appreciates football and maths.

 

Yes, the area of a circle. My dad, before we covered it in school, would tell me pi is 22 divided by 7. Of course, that is an approximation, but near enough for most general uses.

 

As you say, the area of a six inch diameter circle would be pi x R2 = 28.278 sq inches. The method I refer to would be D2 x 0.786 (rounded from 0.7855) would give 28.296. Using a further decimal place; 0.7855, would give 28.278.

 

Great stuff! And there is more. If this thread is a bit quiet one day, we could indulge further into math's mysteries.

If you would like a closer approximation to pi on a calculator just remember the sequence 113355 and divide 355 by 113.

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8 hours ago, Andrew Dwyer said:

Yup , in a can !!

But I seem to remember you boiled the can in water before opening and pouring on the custard, was pretty darn good !!

Can’t imagine microwave getting the same results .

Yes, there’s something to be said for traditional home cooking... 🤔

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7 hours ago, sotonowl said:

Well, what can I say? Up where I come from (Sheffield) we had a potted dog which was actually potted meat or beef spread if you're a southerner. Not sure if I'm allowed to post a link to another forum but here goes,

https://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/topic/268542-potted-dog-where-do-we-get-the-name-from/

That's just how I roll.

Sometimes the police don’t catch on if I do this...

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6 hours ago, grin said:

If you would like a closer approximation to pi on a calculator just remember the sequence 113355 and divide 355 by 113.

Yes indeed grin!

 

The 22/7, in an earlier post, was derived through calculations by Archimedes, and the 355/113 some years later by a Chinese chap who used a multiple-sided polygon approach.

 

Fascinating stuff.

 

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