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To many entries and denied entry

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Again, no evidence that the 180 days are law but this is from the Thai Consulate at Hull's website. I note they say 'rolling period' though and not resetting in January.

 

At the end of the 60-day stay (or 90 days if you have obtained a 30-day extension) it will be necessary to exit Thailand. If exiting to a neighbouring country and re-entering Thailand by air or overland without visa as a tourist you will be allowed a stay of either 15 or 30 days according to nationality. However this is entirely at the discretion of Thai Immigration at the time. Please be aware that if entering Thailand by air without a visa you will are allowed a maximum of three 30-day entries within any rolling 6-month period.

If entering overland without a visa you are allowed a maximum of two 30-day entries within any rolling 12-month period. Also be aware that the Royal Thai Embassies and Consulates in neighbouring countries may restrict the number of visas they will grant to nationals of countries other than the country where the Royal Thai Embassy / Consulate is located.

 

https://www.thaiconsul-uk.com/tourist-visa-single-tr.php

 

I note they state 2 entries by land = 60 days. I thought you were only stamped in for 15 days overland?

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11 hours ago, owenm said:

It's a known fact that either BKK airport will give you grief with your previous travel history.. 

 

If travelling with a visa and entering via CM, I think the likely hood of being refused entry should be greatly diminished, looking at previous reports. But too many VE there, and you'll likely to be refused entry.. 

 

Do not fly into Bangkok, even transit, because you may need to clear immig again to board your forwarding flight.. Fly to KL, and take a new seperate flight to CM.. If refused you'll ONLY be sent back to KL and not to LHR.. Your visa will still be active, just then change your strategy and re-enter via land either from Malaysia or fly and enter via Laos.. Keep your min. 20k Thb or eqiv on hand, invitation from GF or hotel booking, outgoing ticket 60/90 days to anywhere outside Thailand.. Could be Vientiane and then use a land entry to extend your stay further.. 

Is this true in that transit still need to clear immigration even booking via same ticket?  I had asked Thai airways and they mention that my suitcase be forwarded onto my final destination

 

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1 hour ago, KhaoYai said:

I note they state 2 entries by land = 60 days. I thought you were only stamped in for 15 days overland?

All regular visa exempt entries by land have been 30 days since they introduced the limit of two such entries by land in a calendar year.

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2 hours ago, KhaoYai said:

Again, no evidence that the 180 days are law but this is from the Thai Consulate at Hull's website. I note they say 'rolling period' though and not resetting in January.

 

At the end of the 60-day stay (or 90 days if you have obtained a 30-day extension) it will be necessary to exit Thailand. If exiting to a neighbouring country and re-entering Thailand by air or overland without visa as a tourist you will be allowed a stay of either 15 or 30 days according to nationality. However this is entirely at the discretion of Thai Immigration at the time. Please be aware that if entering Thailand by air without a visa you will are allowed a maximum of three 30-day entries within any rolling 6-month period.

If entering overland without a visa you are allowed a maximum of two 30-day entries within any rolling 12-month period. Also be aware that the Royal Thai Embassies and Consulates in neighbouring countries may restrict the number of visas they will grant to nationals of countries other than the country where the Royal Thai Embassy / Consulate is located.

 

https://www.thaiconsul-uk.com/tourist-visa-single-tr.php

 

I note they state 2 entries by land = 60 days. I thought you were only stamped in for 15 days overland?


That official Royal Thai consulate (Hull) website is wrong on a number of counts....

1. re "If exiting to a neighbouring country and re-entering Thailand by air or overland without visa as a tourist you will be allowed a stay of either 15 or 30 days according to nationality."
  (a) it makes no difference whether you exited to a neighbouring country or a faraway country.
  (b) Without a visa, the possibilities are not 15 or 30 days depending on country. Visa-free entry is 90 days for 5 countries; 30 days for 57 countries; and 14 days for 2 countries. (There is also 15 days VOA option for 18 countries, but that is not relevant here where they are talking about visa-free entry.)

2. re "if entering Thailand by air without a visa you will are allowed a maximum of three 30-day entries within any rolling 6-month period." ... there is no such limit.

3. re "If entering overland without a visa you are allowed a maximum of two 30-day entries within any rolling 12-month period." … That is not true. It is per calendar year - not rolling.

Re your comment, "I thought you were only stamped in for 15 days overland?" ... from 31 December 2016 aonwards, it has been 30 days for most nations. Prior to that, it was 30 days for G7 nations, and 14 days (not 15 days) for most others (by land or sea).

Edited by judokrab
add "2016"
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14 hours ago, BuckBee said:

Yes it is

the time span is mentioned in immigration act, look it up, it been linked to several times on this forum, one post in last couple months had good detail and links on it .

No, there is no 180 day timespan per calendar year mentioned in the Immigration Act or in any Police Order. Look it up. 

There was a 90 day limit per rolling six months in effect between 1 October 2006 and 25 November 2008. (And it only pertained to visa-exempt entries.)

Edited by judokrab

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11 hours ago, Tony125 said:

Your wrong and you can spend all the time you wish and will not find it. There was a regulation for about a year that was resinded in 2008 and no longer exists. it is sometimes refered to by IO's but no longer exists.

Actually, it was in effect for a little over two years: 1 October 2006 through 25 November 2008.

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I was at Udon immigration, they hate doing marriage visas, too much paperwork, try to do in your country or Laos

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2 hours ago, judokrab said:

That official Royal Thai consulate (Hull) website is wrong on a number of counts....

They may well be wrong but as many have said, including myself, much of what they state is what is being used in Thailand by I.O.'s considering entry. It may not accord with the law but at the airport, surely I.O.'s are the law?

 

That said, if I was refused entry for no good reason or something that I felt was not within the law, In would call my lawyer. I certainly wouldn't be signing any papers in Thai language that stated I did not have the required amount of cash with me.

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2 hours ago, judokrab said:

No, there is no 180 day timespan per calendar year mentioned in the Immigration Act or in any Police Order. Look it up. 

There was a 90 day limit per rolling six months in effect between 1 October 2006 and 25 November 2008. (And it only pertained to visa-exempt entries.)

With respect and without entering into the argument over whether the 180 days thing is law or not. Surely what matters here is what is happening on the ground? As you may have read, I was told, just 2 weeks ago that there was a limit of 180 days and that it "reset in January".

 

Now, I'm pretty sure that plenty of people go through immigration every day having exceeded that limit - they should consider themselves lucky as they have clearly joined a queue where the officer simply can't be botthered.

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14 hours ago, RyanWalker said:

Yes mate I have stayed about 8 months this year in Thailand. I won't give all the inns & outs here but anyone should be prepared when they stand infront of an IO. Have the stuff worked out in your head when they ask you any question. They can never deny me to go in, as I know what to say after 10 years in Thailand. Btw I stay in Thailand for 10 years now. All SETV's. 

Any tips or pointers on what to say to IO officers when they ask certain questions?

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4 minutes ago, bbi1 said:

Any tips or pointers on what to say to IO officers when they ask certain questions?

When he asks " you hab more than 5 post Thai visa?" say yes because those that have less are all getting rejected..

Edited by madmen
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9 hours ago, KhaoYai said:

With respect and without entering into the argument over whether the 180 days thing is law or not. Surely what matters here is what is happening on the ground? As you may have read, I was told, just 2 weeks ago that there was a limit of 180 days and that it "reset in January".

 

Now, I'm pretty sure that plenty of people go through immigration every day having exceeded that limit - they should consider themselves lucky as they have clearly joined a queue where the officer simply can't be botthered.

As long as you recognise that any unofficial limit specified by an official applies (at most) only to that particular entry point, what that official says should be taken seriously. If you are using what a consulate website writes or a random official says as indicating some global unofficial rule, I think you are taking one data point too seriously.

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11 hours ago, BritTim said:

As long as you recognise that any unofficial limit specified by an official applies (at most) only to that particular entry point, what that official says should be taken seriously. If you are using what a consulate website writes or a random official says as indicating some global unofficial rule, I think you are taking one data point too seriously.

I have never thought anything was official or happening everywhere. I was purely saying that the 180 day rulle or whatever you want to call it, seems to be backed up by the information given on at least one consulate's website.

 

I also rely on personal experience.

Edited by KhaoYai

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On 11/20/2019 at 12:41 AM, KhaoYai said:

With respect and without entering into the argument over whether the 180 days thing is law or not. Surely what matters here is what is happening on the ground? As you may have read, I was told, just 2 weeks ago that there was a limit of 180 days and that it "reset in January".

 

Now, I'm pretty sure that plenty of people go through immigration every day having exceeded that limit - they should consider themselves lucky as they have clearly joined a queue where the officer simply can't be botthered.

Your take on luck is certainly valid, but I think you're missing a key theme in the debate over what is/isn't the law. 

 

This all comes down to a lack of transparency, consistency, and even common sense in Thai immigration policies. I'm used to a system in which it's hard to get something through the legislature and approved by the executive, but Thailand doesn't really have that "problem." The people in charge are perfectly capable of passing a "law" or even just promulgating official "regulations" that clarify all this. They choose not to, for whatever reason. And then you wind up with a hundred little fiefdoms all interpreting the intent of the actual laws as they see fit.

 

Been "spending too much time in Thailand?" Well, then you're "not a tourist." No real legal basis to deny you entry? Oh, we'll just say you lack the means to support yourself. Or that we suspect you're working (this is a labor department concern, really). 

 

If Thailand wants a 180-day policy or a limit on the number of entries, it can enact it. If it wants a "soft cap" that allows for exceptions, it can do that too. It wouldn't be unreasonable, and folks who feel like they have good reasons to spend more time can always try to invoke one of the exceptions or go down another path (non-tourist visas/exceptions). But when the ministry approves a tourist visa and some IO having a bad day at the border disagrees, they're often violating their own laws and fueling disdain for Thai authorities. 

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