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Thian

Is this cheese?

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2 minutes ago, Thian said:

So if i bring a vacuum pack (which i sterilise at the outside) of cheese to the mount everest it won't get mould there?

It'll be frozen so not a good example.  

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1 hour ago, Thian said:

So if i bring a vacuum pack (which i sterilise at the outside) of cheese to the mount everest it won't get mould there?

 

I never heard of this but it might be possible.

 

So i can also open this pack of california cheese and it won't get mold? I can try that since i want it out of the kitchen anyway..

Well, fungi is a living organism and as such it need warmth, oxygen and moisture to propagate. If you've ever made bread or fermented beer or wine. you'd know what I mean.

 

Basically give it the right conditions and it grows.

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9 minutes ago, Moonlover said:

Well, fungi is a living organism and as such it need warmth, oxygen and moisture to propagate. If you've ever made bread or fermented beer or wine. you'd know what I mean.

 

Basically give it the right conditions and it grows.

Alright the mount everest was a bad example, so let's say i bring it to Ayers Rock in Australia, it's hot there and there has never been any dutch cheese before...so there's a big chance it won't get mould there?

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17 minutes ago, Thian said:

Alright the mount everest was a bad example, so let's say i bring it to Ayers Rock in Australia, it's hot there and there has never been any dutch cheese before...so there's a big chance it won't get mould there?

Ok, I can give a practical example. Before moving here, I lived in Egypt. Hot and dry much like Australia. I used to buy import Dutch cheese there, mainly Gouda in vacuum sealed packs.

 

No mould at all until I opened the pack, then it would slowly begin to grow. The spore would have been in the pack, but dormant until I opened it.

 

But, not all cheese has fungi in the manufacturing process and not mold is fungi. It can also be bacteria. It's not as simple as we think.

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If the cheese was in an opened pack in the fridge for six month, probably the cheese dried out before it could get molded.

Mold grows on foods containing water. And, since the cheese was shredded, the exposed surface is far greater so the drying process is also far quicker.

Edited by hugocnx

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9 hours ago, hugocnx said:

If the cheese was in an opened pack in the fridge for six month, probably the cheese dried out before it could get molded.

Mold grows on foods containing water. And, since the cheese was shredded, the exposed surface is far greater so the drying process is also far quicker.

This cheese is in a ziplocked bag which i close of course before putting it in the fridge. I hate dried out cheese/butter/bread.

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10 hours ago, Moonlover said:

Ok, I can give a practical example. Before moving here, I lived in Egypt. Hot and dry much like Australia. I used to buy import Dutch cheese there, mainly Gouda in vacuum sealed packs.

 

No mould at all until I opened the pack, then it would slowly begin to grow. The spore would have been in the pack, but dormant until I opened it.

 

But, not all cheese has fungi in the manufacturing process and not mold is fungi. It can also be bacteria. It's not as simple as we think.

Dutch Gouda cheese is not made with fungus as far as i know...it's milk curd with an enzyme from a calf's belly iirc which is pressed and let to ripen in a climate room.

 

 

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38 minutes ago, Thian said:

Dutch Gouda cheese is not made with fungus as far as i know...it's milk curd with an enzyme from a calf's belly iirc which is pressed and let to ripen in a climate room.

 

 

Agreed. I think the general rule is 'hard cheeses' (e.g. Gouda) use bacterium, 'soft and blue cheese' (e.g. Stilton) use fungi. (often made in caves such as Roquefort. Been there!)

 

Anyway I think the answer to your question lies elsewhere in this thread. @scottiejohn in post #9 mentioned that they put chemicals onto grated cheese to prevent it sticking together. It's very likely that it leaves a coating that will prevent bacteria or fungi from attaching to the cheese. Just like the wax coating on a round of Edam.

 

Have a nice day.

Edited by Moonlover
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When that brand first became available I did some research on it.  Real cheese with minimal or no additives made by what seems to be a quality company.  It's not processed cheese food product!  

 

It's also not great cheese.  It is what it is at a very reasonable price!

 

http://www.pacificcheese.com/our-story/

Edited by ricklev

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38 minutes ago, Moonlover said:

Anyway I think the answer to your question lies elsewhere in this thread. @scottiejohn in post #9 mentioned that they put chemicals onto grated cheese to prevent it sticking together. It's very likely that it leaves a coating that will prevent bacteria or fungi from attaching to the cheese. Just like the wax coating on a round of Edam.

 

Anybody correct me if i'm wrong but i read somewhere that grated parmesan cheese uses cellulose made of finely grinded wood into the cheese to stop it from lumping....I also read somewhere that indians also put that in their currypowder for same reason.

 

Well i'm no expert but i guess the cellulose is safe to eat or it wouldn't be sold in Holland in grated parmesan cheese.

 

The wax coating around Dutch cheese is to stop it from drying out too fast and to protect it from bacterials? I don't know exactly but i also like hard german cheese which is all natural and a reward winner, it has a very soft sticky crust...Don't know the function of that crust but hard cheese needs it during the ripening process.

 

Here you can see how they make Gouda. 10 litre milk gives 1 kg of cheese. Wait this was goatcheese.

 

Here is farmers gouda cheese

 

 

Edited by Thian
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16 hours ago, Moonlover said:

Well, fungi is a living organism and as such it need warmth, oxygen and moisture to propagate. If you've ever made bread or fermented beer or wine. you'd know what I mean.

 

Basically give it the right conditions and it grows.

Like a yeast infection you mean?

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16 hours ago, Thian said:

Alright the mount everest was a bad example, so let's say i bring it to Ayers Rock in Australia, it's hot there and there has never been any dutch cheese before...so there's a big chance it won't get mould there?

Ayers Rock is now Uluru and is closed to non-indigenous people and their scientific experiments.

 

But not to totally waste the trip, maybe see if the dingo's will eat it?

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14 minutes ago, NanLaew said:

Ayers Rock is now Uluru and is closed to non-indigenous people and their scientific experiments.

 

But not to totally waste the trip, maybe see if the dingo's will eat it?

I can go to the next rock, plenty of them in that area and the other ones are exactly the same but nobody visits them.

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17 hours ago, Thian said:

This cheese is in a ziplocked bag which i close of course before putting it in the fridge. I hate dried out cheese/butter/bread.

Your opening statement "This cheese was in our fridge for 6 months, an opened bag....." After opening ziplocked. Got it.

A ziplock bag is just to give you the idea that you kind of packed it again like original or sort of airtight. It is not. And at least not for 6 months.

Why you bought it in the first place and then store it in your fridge for 6 months.

 

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4 hours ago, hugocnx said:

Your opening statement "This cheese was in our fridge for 6 months, an opened bag....." After opening ziplocked. Got it.

A ziplock bag is just to give you the idea that you kind of packed it again like original or sort of airtight. It is not. And at least not for 6 months.

Why you bought it in the first place and then store it in your fridge for 6 months.

 

I bought it in Foodland because it was in promotion, pay 1 get 2 bags...

 

And when i went abroad my wife didn't eat it so it got lost in our very large fridge.

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