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More foreign English teachers set to be hired as Thais aim for better than basic English

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I think it's pretty well been covered. 

 

It not necessarily the additional numbers of teachers or the caliber of them. Its just pouring whatever on a pile of <deleted>. Be it the administration, Thai teachers, the Thai approach to teaching, class sizes or existing foriegn, "ummm ... teachers"  (by an extreme stretch). 

 

The entire approach to education is not designed to develop and promote learning. Greater focus on learning where ones station is in life.

 

Don't like that opinion? Two minutes Google search you can come across some really interesting articles.

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There is already resentment of "privileged farang" teachers from (some) Thai staff, admins, etc. And that's at private international schools with plenty of flexibility in their budgets. How are things going to go over when this fabulous plan (which will no doubt be enacted and fully funded) takes hold and the powers that be realize...

 

...you can't attract quality NES candidates at Thai government school salaries?

...if you pay them what (they think) they're worth, they're stirring up a boatload of trouble when it comes to Thais (further) realizing how unappreciated their own teachers are?

 

Oh, and the whole reliance on rote learning, large class sizes, yadda yadda yadda. 

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1 hour ago, aussienam said:

The UK ..... don't they speak Arabic?  

Southall and London in general plus Leicester and midlands Arabic, Southampton it's Polish, Bradford and West Yorks Bangladeshi, Indian and Pakistani, Bristol and Scottish cities it's Romanian etc etc.

In the southern States of the USA about 30% of the population speak Spanish or Portuguese.

Statistics are on the official websites.

Edited by George FmplesdaCosteedback

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A friend of mine taught English in Thailand. His experience.

 

- Salary 35,000 for 40 hours a week in a private school. That's $1,150/month

- Hours 0700-1600 with an hour for lunch, five hours classes per day and three for office hours

- Must create and plan own lessons, plus prepare own materials (had to file a written plan in the record) and give and mark homework, he says about one to two hours on top of the office hours

- Yelled at by Director if even slightly late and must stay until the end of the day watching the clock

- Spent most of his time dealing with bad behaviour compared with teaching

- Most students have no interest whatsoever, but he was told that he can't fail them

- Paid holidays according to Thai public holidays plus 14 days

 

Gave up and went to China where he's now getting RMB  18,000 for 20 hours (4h x 5) classroom only in a university, which is about $2,600/month.

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Thailand has many good English language teachers already living here and many will work for the lower wages Thailand offers it's foreign teachers.

 

The real issue is the requirement for a degree... any degree. Someone with a degree in housekeeping qualifies to teach English, in many cases they don't even have an English language teaching certificate like a TESOL but still qualify to teach English in the schools.

 

If you want to attract more and possibly better teachers, then make the requirement:

  1. a recognized English language teaching certificate as priority,
  2. experience in teaching English language and
  3. if needed for a work permit a degree or equivalent experience.

This is why globally there seems to be a shortage of English language teachers... just look at the online job boards. They can't fill them because they only hire people with degrees in anything.

 

The degree was only to meet the governments requirement for a work permit. Even online teaching companies now require a degree and they don't even know why. There's no work permit needed to teach online but yet the companies (most anyways) require a degree and many don't require an English language teaching certificate.

 

Since 2014 I have taught for three online schools, the first one was for students in China only but the pay was too low. The second one was based in Europe and taught mainly European business students, I really liked this job but the company wasn't very good and again the pay was really low.

 

The online company I teach for now I've been with for 3 years, they are not really a school but a portal where students and teachers meet. It's taken a while to build up my students but it's pretty good now and they pay weekly. I set my own rates and hours too.

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15 hours ago, Emdog said:

Is immigration on board for this? Have they even been consulted?

How about cutting through red tape and rip offs and allow retired native English speakers to teach part time? I was a teacher in USA & native English (okay, American) speaker. I don't need the money and would enjoy maybe 10 hrs a week... but I would not put up with ignorant administration making money off of my free time, among other things.

 

Identical situation here.  Also, at the many Thai Schools that I have worked at, the Passive-Aggressive, (Indirect Hostility,) was so thick that you couldn't cut it with a knife!  Methinks this might be one of the "among other things" emdog referred to above.  

schoolsuccess.jpg

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Nothing will happen, this is just a proposal. And as we all know, Thailand is the HUB of proposals. 

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8 hours ago, Huckenfell said:

I am a retired person, English grammar school educated. I have got plenty of spare time and would love to help teach young kids English. I am not overly anxious on wages, but without a work visa this is not possible. I am sure that somewhere in Isaan there would be a small school that would appreciate my help, something that i would happily do.

 

I believe that you can't teach without wages in a small school without a visa.

 

You still need a volunteer visa to do that.

 

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2 hours ago, balo said:

Nothing will happen, this is just a proposal. And as we all know, Thailand is the HUB of proposals. 

 

Most people don't seem to understand that the Thai language is so different from European languages that it takes a huge amount of effort to learn English for Thai people.

 

And vice versa of course.

 

It takes less effort for a European speaker to speak another European language because the grammar and phonology are more similar.

 

So this would just be a proposal but never become a reality.

Edited by EricTh

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13 hours ago, DiJoDavO said:

There are many words which are written with an ส=s at the end. 

When talking about writing there certainly are words ending with an s. But talking about pronunciation, no. Because the s will get the sound of a d. Or more like a sudden stop. 

These words are mostly borrowed from another language, but why the s is not pronounced, I'm not sure. 🙂

I just asked my wife about this, showed her the letter you indicated. She says that the letter is there at the end of words, but never pronounced, sort of the like final 'e' in English words. Life is strange...language even more so.

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