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Hotel group seeks rules on Airbnb

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Hotel group seeks rules on Airbnb

By THE NATION

 

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Supawan Tanomkieatipume

 

The Thai Hotels Association (THA) has requested a meeting with the Minister of Interior Gen Anuphong Phaochinda, on the impact of short-term rental and home sharing services, also commonly known as Airbnb, on domestic hotel business nationwide, said president Supawan Tanomkieatipume.

 

“THA has no intention to seek a ban on these services in Thailand,” she said, adding “We just want the government to issue suitable regulations on the operations of these service providers, as well as enforce related laws and quality control measures to protect customers.”

 

Supawan suggested that providers of short-term rental and home sharing services should be required to register with tourism-related agencies under the Ministry of Interior. They should apply for a business licence, the same requirement for hotel entrepreneurs, before commencing operation. Furthermore, these providers should display their licence numbers when advertising their services via regular and online media.

 

THA also wants the ministry to include short-term rental and home sharing services in the total number of hotel entrepreneurs in Thailand, so that the government can design suitable measures to promote hotel business based on the actual number of entrepreneurs in the market.

 

“A preliminary survey by THA revealed that there are over 21,000 providers of accommodations not listed as hotel entrepreneurs scattered around Bangkok and tourist cities. Without knowing the actual number of competitors, hotel entrepreneurs face the risk of room oversupply," she said.

 

Statistics published by Airbnb earlier this year revealed that home sharing business in Thailand had generated more than Bt33.8 billion to property owners as well as local communities where the accommodations are located.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30379031

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2019-12-03
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8 minutes ago, ukrules said:

They don't want to ban Airbnb, they want to ban everyone from using it to rent out rooms except for licensed hotels which is pretty much only them.

Which was great when high season meant all the hotels were fully booked and latecomers were left with the evil Airbnb lets and nobody cared or even noticed.  How times have changed.  

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38 minutes ago, ukrules said:

They don't want to ban Airbnb, they want to ban everyone from using it to rent out rooms except for licensed hotels which is pretty much only them.

 

 

You forgot one minor part, the "licensed" ones are the 4-5 star ones, part of big groups;)

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25 minutes ago, BestB said:

a year ago she forced government to raid "unlicensed" hotels, though hotel license not available unless building from the ground up.

 

Now she wants for everyone to register, fair enough, but what business license? back to hotel license?

 

I am only guessing but i reckon she is too thick to understand, pushing out cheaper competition, will not bring her more customers, those who could afford 4-5 star hotels, never stayed in anything cheaper and those who could not, simply will not come if cheap accommodation is not available.

Too lol.

 

She might have pressed for the raids but if the hotels are illegal they are illegal! What sort of logic is this?

 

Maybe the only reason they are cheaper is because they lack all the safety standards she'd invested in. Stupid backpackers will sleep in any old fire trap.

 

Edited by Number 6
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15 minutes ago, Number 6 said:

I've used abnb and honestly I dislike it on many levels. It's usually much less hassle to stay in a hotel and usually the same price. You get your own room not some creepy debtburdened faux landlord lording over your comings and goings. No need to tiptoe about. No cleaning deposits and cards with funds on hold. No bs reviews about how you are as a paying customer!

 

Further, hotels pay lots of taxes and have safety standards homes and condos don't have.

You’re certainly correct in that a 24 hour check-in desk at a hotel’s less hassle, but I think airbnb’s perfect if you need a stay of a few weeks, which is too long in a hotel, but too short for a normal rental contract. I also like having my own kitchen, and being able to select an apartment with a good view.

As for bs reviews, after staying in dozens of airbnb’s I’ve yet to receive a bad review.

You do have a point about taxes, but I don’t understand the safety standards issue. I’ve stayed in a Jomtien apartment as an airbnb guest, and I now own a condo in the same building, but I don’t see how being an owner magically means I need different safety standards than a short term renter.

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14 minutes ago, CygnusX1 said:

You’re certainly correct in that a 24 hour check-in desk at a hotel’s less hassle, but I think airbnb’s perfect if you need a stay of a few weeks, which is too long in a hotel, but too short for a normal rental contract. I also like having my own kitchen, and being able to select an apartment with a good view.

As for bs reviews, after staying in dozens of airbnb’s I’ve yet to receive a bad review.

You do have a point about taxes, but I don’t understand the safety standards issue. I’ve stayed in a Jomtien apartment as an airbnb guest, and I now own a condo in the same building, but I don’t see how being an owner magically means I need different safety standards than a short term renter.

Your last sentence is precisely the reason why Thai law is so stupid.

 

It is ok to rent the very same room/apartment on monthly basis, totally safe but somehow becomes unsafe for lesser term.

 

One of the points, must have parking for daily rentals, but common sense suggests those who are tourists are less likely to have a vehicle than those living full time.

 

Daily rentals, must have fire alarms fitted, but for monthly, its ok to burn.

 

Daily rentals must have staircase of certain width, but totally irrelevant for monthly.

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Never had a problem with abnb, I always respect the unit, therefore have good reviews, easy checkin, no tip toeing around. It helps tourism as not a lot of people can afford to stay in 4-5 star hotels.

 

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3 minutes ago, Destiny1990 said:

Can she explains how would condo units get those airbnb hotel licenses?

Ohhh but you missed it, she has now changed her tunes, She is now saying business license not hotel license, though what  exactly is business license  remains to be discovered

Edited by BestB
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