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Any issue bringing MANY electronics gifts from usa?

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I'm considering bringing back some good quality & good price electronics in my carryon luggage from the states. I'll need to buy 5 of the same model, (one for each Thai family member). I'm more than happy to pay tax. These are 100% gifts (no reimbursements)

As I'm currently on a Non-Ed Thai Language Education Visa, I hope customs doesn't think I'm trying to start a business. Is there any reason to be worried? Or am I overthinking it?

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I would not do myself as it indeed appears you are importing with 5 new items the same and customs really not designed for such importation at airport.  They are going to start x-ray of all incoming baggage in the near future so if in operation would make some inspectors day.  

 

Another factor to consider is can these items be 220v 50Hz powered?

 

Although agree US prices are among the best in the world for many such things you might check Aliexpress for similar items direct from China which can normally be sent here without duty issues.

 

Your (sometimes dubious) visa status does not help matters.  

Edited by lopburi3
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US electronics probably wont handle the thai voltage, we got a US item and it blew the first time it was plugged in, as stated above, better of buying from aliexpress

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10 hours ago, lopburi3 said:

They are going to start x-ray of all incoming baggage in the near future so if in operation would make some inspectors day. 

That appears to be hold luggage while the OP has said the goods will be in hand luggage.  Nevertheless there is still the chance they are X-Rayed going through the green channel which means they still risk being detected and treated as an import with all that entails.

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Gifts up to a total value of THB 10,000 can be brought in free of duty. There was some talk recently about increasing this and I don't know if it has happened.

 

The OP mentioned that he is willing to pay import duty, if necessary. This can be quite high for electrical and electronic items. Best check this out beforehand.

 

Another detail: when import duty is due, it is assessed at CIF (cost, insurance and freight) value. For goods brought personally into the country, customs has been known to calculate the freight at 1% of first class air fare per kilogramme gross weight.

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First it is voltage!  second it is voltage! 3rd it is voltage!  made in the U.S. it really isn't any longer?  if you haven't gotten it yet, then don't pack it together in one piece of luggage unless you have no choice spread it around and take the batteries out if provided.

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ask the guy who returned to your country wearing 5 knockoff rolex watches?

 

 

 

 

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I agree with the replies indicating that Thai Customs might assume you are planning to resell the 5 items.  Personally, I wouldn't do that, but I would and have brought in products for my personal use,

 

Regarding electrical voltage and frequency.  Almost all mobile devices (notebook computers, tablets, mobile phones, camera battery chargers, etc.) have universal power supplies that will work in Thailand and most other countries.  If it says, "100 - 240V~50/60 Hz", it will work here.  However, TVs, coffee makers, toasters, hair dryers, clocks, etc., will not work in Thailand, and could present a fire hazard as they are designed to operation on lower voltage.  The difference in frequency (50 Hz vs. 60 Hz) usually doesn't matter except with timing devices, such as clocks.

 

With regard to "Made in China", brand name products sold in the USA comply with the brand name specs, for instance iPhones are made in China, BUT they comply with Apple specs.  Whereas, Chinese brand products vary widely in quality in my personal experience.  So I'm not concerned when buying brand name products made in China, but tend to be cautious with Chinese brands.  To be fair, some Chinese brands are now good quality at attractive prices. 

 

Hope that helps. Cheers

 

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12 minutes ago, donmuang37 said:

The difference in frequency (50 Hz vs. 60 Hz) usually doesn't matter except with timing devices, such as clocks.

But it makes a huge difference with any AC motor (not just clocks) using device - they will run slow and likely not do the job intended and/or overheat due to the lower cost construction for 60Hz.  

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The majority of US items these days are rated from 110 VAC to 240 VAC and have no problem working in Thailand or anywhere else.

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Regarding voltage: 

You need to look if those 5 items using step-down adapters and if the adapter working voltage is 100-240 (or there is a supply voltage switch on the unit) then there is nothing to be worry about.

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I think your question was focused on whether or not five of the same items would look like a business to the inspectors.  Of course, anything might happen, but my one recent experience with Customs at the Bangkok airport was pretty relaxed.  I arrived with over $1,500 USD in phones and a camera for family gifts.  Like you, I was willing to pay the duty to avoid having the items confiscated and having a sad story to tell about that.

 

The custom workers in the inspection lane tried a couple of times to send me through express and I had to insist that I wanted to declare some items.  I opened my luggage and showed the items to them.  They asked me for a total value, took my word for it, and I paid  the duty with a credit card.

 

Not exactly your situation, but I think as long as you are up front about it you shouldn't have a problem.  It might help to have some information available (names, relationship) on who will be receiving the gifts, but I might be overthinking it.

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14 minutes ago, tv101 said:

Not exactly your situation, but I think as long as you are up front about it you shouldn't have a problem. 

My eyeballs are spinning at an alarming rate.  Glad it got sorted, nonetheless. 

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Just make sure you declare the items on the customs declarations form you must fill out before landing/immigration.  If you say that you have nothing to declare and try to exit via the "nothing to declare lane" (and get stopped) you will have a big problem. 

 

I recall recently someone got caught with 10 new cell phones in his bag and did not declare them.  He was arrested on the spot at the airport.  Like others have said, make sure the items will be compatible with the voltage here and it may be cheaper to just buy the items here (rather than bring them and pay the customs duty).

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