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rooster59

The week that was in Thailand news: Lost in translation! It happens to us all from time to time!

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Knobhead

 

Knobhead (77°55′S 161°34′E) is a massive ice-free mountain, 2,400 metres (7,900 ft) high, standing south of the western end of the Kukri Hillsand overlooking Ferrar Glacier and Taylor Glacier at their point of apposition, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04) and so named because of its appearance.

 

A border word that gets its spin in Australian language as <deleted>,

the second poster on Khun Tarin's achievement  wears the title well

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1 hour ago, overherebc said:

Friend who was exceptionaly proud of his 'pony tail' and was learning Thai went for a shampoo and little trim in BKK.

He said the words 50/50 Thai and English 'May Aow cut short'.

Two seconds later his 'pony tail' was handed to him, with a smile, of course.

It was perhaps better than removing his smaller tail.

 

  I love language articles to death. And I almost got killed when I accidentally misused the words "hoy and menn". The waitress almost killed me. 

 

A friend of mine with an unbelievable vocab in Thai, unfortunately a brutal way of pronouncing them, made me laugh so many times.

 

   Instead using the word Krung Thip for his fags, he wanted Krung Thep and didn't understand why they didn't have that and pointed in the air where they thought Bangkok would be located. 

 

And another guy using the 50/ 50 language got huge troubles when he used key and khun together. Vice versa and made somebody to a <deleted>-y person. 

 

He wanted to know if the guy had seen his keys.

 

  But we all know that shi_e happens. Innit?  😎

 

 

 

  

 

 

Edited by Isaanbiker

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Carefull Rooster I was sin binned for my miss interpretation of "septic rings" post as someone found it offensive.

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9 hours ago, kickstart said:

{snipped}

My one ,my wife has a friend called Moie ,I said to her is Moie come coming round ,she looked at me in a strange way ,long story short ,Moie in wrong tone what I said , is pubic hair.  

But the tassels on a cob of sweet corn,before the outer shell is taken off  is known on the farm as Moie ,pubic hair . 

If you're Thai and visiting Finland don't be offended when Finns say 'hello'. It's the same word as pubic hair in Thai (assuming they say it with a rising tone).

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After several book courses, the linguaphone course and language Schools I married a Thai language teacher. 25 years latter the staff in shops still have trouble understanding the numbers i give them on the membership cards, I know when to give up!

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14 hours ago, rooster59 said:

rather like Australians referring to their best mates as "bastards".

Showing your age here Rooster we now endearingly refer to our mates as "kents", to use a printable version of the vernacular.In case you're wondering the word "kent" is an amalgamation of the words "kind gentleman".

Edited by FarFlungFalang
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49 minutes ago, bluesofa said:

If you're Thai and visiting Finland don't be offended when Finns say 'hello'. It's the same word as pubic hair in Thai (assuming they say it with a rising tone).

And if you work in Norway and you're asked what your job is say you are an engineer, don't say you're a fitter ( especially with a geordie accent ) or you'll get some strange looks.

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1 hour ago, bluesofa said:

Reminds me of Brian Cant of Play School fame.

I remember something like Red Nose Day when someone asked him, "Is your name Brian Cant?", to which he replied, "There's no need to be rude."

I wonder what superman would make of being one of the more well known Kents?

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16 hours ago, rooster59 said:

The forum went into curmudgeon overdrive

Rooster, herein there is a problem.  While your knowledge and use of the English language, and you often state your preference is for using the USA vernacular, is profound, Curmudgeon is one of those transatlantic words that has different meanings depending on the users location of origin.  In North America, as a noun it refers to a person considered to be bad-tempered, disagreeable, or stubborn whereas in the U.K., as a noun, it is used to describe a killjoy or a wet blanket.

'nuf sed.

Edited by wotsdermatter
slight adjustment as hard return separated lines

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