Jump to content
BANGKOK
webfact

More efforts needed to tackle Thailand's stark inequality

Recommended Posts

More efforts needed to tackle Thailand's stark inequality

 

opinion1.jpg

 

How sustainable is development when more than two-thirds of the assets of a country is controlled by 1 per cent of its people?

 

This situation reported by Credit Suisse in its latest Global Wealth Report reflects the stark wealth disparity prevailing in Thailand, representing one of the root causes of entrenched inequality – a key impediment for any country to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

 

How do we compare the life of a young boy born in a wealthy family in Bangkok, with his family endowment opening the door to high-paying jobs through quality education in the country’s best school and accessing information and technologies that being fully digitally literate allows, to that of a young girl born in a hilltribe in northern Thailand or a LGBTI person from a rural area struggling to find a decent job after attending the local public school and too often still victim of discrimination, significantly limiting opportunities to fulfil their life aspirations?

 

It is evident that circumstances almost entirely beyond their control have already set them on unequal – and likely irreversible – courses in life.

 

Moreover, inequality in Thailand, like in many countries, is today exacerbated by climate change, economic downturn, and technological transformation. Increasing incidents of floods and droughts destroy crops and depress the income of farmers who take to the street to seek government assistance. In addition, the lacklustre economic growth together with looming disruptions in various industries have led to factories shutting down and workers losing their jobs. Such a situation results in growing frustration, as more people feel that economic and political structures are rigged against them.

 

These challenges to sustainable and inclusive development support the core analysis of the new UNDP’s Global Human Development Report entitled “Beyond income, beyond averages, beyond today: inequalities in human development in the 21st century” launched on December 9. 

 

In addition to strong analyses of issues, it presents decision-makers with the choice to overturn deep-rooted systemic drivers of inequality. In doing so, there is the opportunity to simultaneously eliminate extreme deprivation while equipping everyone to live with dignity, manage the fallout of our planet heating up and benefit from modern breakthroughs in artificial intelligence and robotics. 

 

According to the 2019 Human Development Report, Thailand achieves a Human Development Index (HDI) of 0.765, an improvement compared to previous years. Featuring at 77th place in world rankings (out of 189 economies), Thailand is the developing country that has progressed the most in the world in its HDI over the period 2013-2018, up by 12 ranks. This shows the country’s remarkable progress in laying the foundation for human development, as indicated in the continued improvement in life expectancy at birth, years of schooling, and income per capita.

 

However, when discounted for inequality, Thailand’s HDI declines by 16.9 per cent to 0.635. If not addressed, it will only get harder to correct the widening trajectory of inequality as the climate crisis and technological disruptions are already hitting the poorest population the hardest and earliest. This calls for urgent action.

 

The United Nations Development Programme acknowledges the efforts of the Thai government and other development actors in adopting policies and taking initiatives to address inequalities. An elected parliament and expected local elections indicate commitment to enhance people’s participation and support local authorities in the delivery of better targeted public services.

 

The private sector’s active engagement is reflected in their strong mobilisation for the sustainable development goals with the recent launch of the Thailand Responsible Business Network. Thailand is also the first Asian country to formally adopt a National Action Plan on Business and Human Rights. These are just a few but critical tools endorsed by Thailand to foster sustainable human development.

 

That said, more steps need to be taken. To effectively reduce inequality within the country, the right policy mix should be complemented with greater decentralisation of public administration for those policies to translate into action at local level.

 

Enabling the citizens, particularly those that are marginalised by geography, income or disability, to thrive rather than just survive in an era of climate crisis and technological transformation should be at the forefront of inequality reduction strategies. In addition, the private sectors’ initiatives to support sustainable development should go beyond tackling environmental problems and encompass social dimensions and inclusion.

 

On gender inequality, policies should seek to change social norms and eliminate discrimination, including against LGBT, through education, awareness and changing incentives.

 

Most of all, to tackle the sense of disenchantment and dispossession underpinning the discontent of many, leaders must redouble their efforts to remove the alienating, insurmountable and unfair obstacles their citizens face in achieving the life they want for themselves. If not, the growing resentment and frustration may weaken social cohesion and people’s trust in government, institutions, and each other.

 

Inequality in Thailand is not inevitable. The UNDP is committed to continue its support to the government and other development actors to make the difficult choices needed to provide all citizens – now and in the future – with a fair and dignified lot in life, powered by technology, shielded from prejudice and protected from an increasingly unforgiving climate.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/opinion/30379252

 

nation.jpg

-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2019-12-10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Thechook said:

Does that mean they will abolish dual pricing and see all as equals

Stop dreaming chook.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they did this who would clean the floors, cook the food, wipe babies behind and risk life and limb to build houses?

 

the system is already perfect for the elites surely?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Thechook said:

Does that mean they will abolish dual pricing and see all as equals

This is what Thai wives are for, buying from market vendors and buying tickets at the booths whilst we cower round the corner in order to save a few baht !

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's usually a way to end inequality. It's called an uprising. Thais seem incapable of it, so why bother writing articles.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1% owns 2/3 of the country´s assets. Yep, that´s what happens when allowing corruption to float.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Filipplenoir said:

This article raised important issues and drowned it in nonsense PC lingo

Well stated.  It has flooded here for thousands of years.  We have climate change, but it's been doing that since the earth began. I agree that the rich children have more advantages, but there was no need to segregate and use the PC machine as a divider.

 

Sadly for the poor it's cheaper here for us here because of the 'rich' controlling the cost.  Just look at the minimum wage.  If they implemented a Baht 3600/day minimum here, just think what the prices would be.

1 hour ago, DrTuner said:

There's usually a way to end inequality. It's called an uprising. Thais seem incapable of it, so why bother writing articles.

I just hope I'm not here if/when it happens.  Just look at the violence between the Red & Yellows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, webfact said:

More efforts needed to tackle Thailand's stark inequality

 

The Junta are doing their best to make things as inequitable as possible. Too soon to criticize . Give them more time and they will make the effort needed to ensure the 1 percenters will have it all. Mission accomplished.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 6 Thb ,is going to go a long way to help.🙄

regards Worgeordie

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, PatOngo said:

There's only one solution!

 

 

eat-the-rich.jpg

 

Also known as Corbynomics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every time I see the words "Sustainable Development", I have a Goering moment and find myself reaching for an imaginary Walther.

 

I gather the ultimate aim is to somehow prune the human population to a tenth of its present size and decant the remnants into "smart cities" ruled by a world governmnet of technocrats.

 

What's not to like?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...