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Sheryl

Understanding processor speeds - Macbook Pro

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I am planning to get a new Macbook Pro as my 2012 one is pretty worn out - I've already replaced parts of the keyboard twice and now more keys have worn down, the power button is permanently depressed and it is just all over old and battered though still humming along.

 

Thought to get a Macbook Pro 13" 2019 but was confused to find that it has only 1.6GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor whereas my old machine is 2.9 GHz Intel Core i7.

 

I certainly don't want to spend money for new only to get a slower machine. It does say "Turbo Boost up to 3.9 Ghz"  which I assume means that it in fact will process at speeds higher than my present machine,  but when I tried to discuss this with computer store staff I either got unintelligible answers or was told that this new machine will be slower than what I now have.

 

It is hard for me to believe Apple would go for slower processing speed in newer models.

 

Can someone explain this?

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The new one is as they say slower than the old one you have. Although it will be a newer generation of processor in the new one, and that will lead to a lower resistance in regard to output and input as well as handling of information. That it boost up to 3,9 Ghz is a good thing. It will be slower though, but not as much slower as they want you to belive in the shop.

However, you have a choice of the MacBook 13 2019 with 2,4ghz cpu that will boost up to a maximum of 4,1 Ghz. Together with the new technology in this generation of processors that one will probably act like it would be quicker than your old one.

The real MacBook Pro also do not have a dual core processor. they have quad core, which means they will work at the same speed in four cores simultaniously which will make tham quicker. Please read https://www.apple.com/th-en/shop/buy-mac/macbook-pro/13-inch

 

There you will also find the ones for speed freaks in 16 inch models. Have i7 or i9 but they will cost you a few bahts more.

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Many thanks, Matzzon.

 

I am actually now in Cambodia and was looking here, have not found the 2.4Ghz but now that I know it exists will look specifically for it.  I am fine with the speed I currently have (though faster is always nice...) just don't want to spend money only to downgrade! It surprises me that Apple is making newer models slower than old ones. Surely processor speed is a key feature for most people?

 

I had wanted to buy while still  in Cambodia because prices are lower and the sales people are (usually) better informed.  If I do need to resort to buying direct from Apple in Thailand do you know if they will pre-install software i.e. Microsoft Office for Mac? (I hate it but have no choice, have to share files with colleagues that use WIndows).

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I have just purchased the new MacBook Air 1.6 GHz Dual Core.

 

The Pro's come with a 1.4 GHz Quad Core or a 2.4 GHz Quad Core.

 

What all that means to me is a little uncertain. However after some research I went for the MacBook Air 1.6GHz Dual Core and its been fine.

 

 

My usage is not heavy so the Pro 2.4 GHz Quad Core would definitely be overkill. I recently did some video editing with the MacBook Air and was impressed with how it handled the volumes of information.

 

 

If you are Multi-tasking, More Cores is better. But if not running lots of applications / programs at the same time a 1.6 GHz Dual Core will out perform a 1.4 GHz Quad Core.

 

Can the average person such as myself tell this difference?.... nope - I've not managed to overload my machine yet. 

 

 

So... the only advice I have to offer would be to consider whether someone really needs the Quad Core Pro and the additional GHz.

 

As far as the 2.4 GHz Quad Core model is concerned, again it depends on your usage, I would suggest that this is more for 'professional use' i.e. video / music / hi-definition photo editing and even special effects etc, if someone doesn't do any of this I'm not sure they would ever need such a high spec machine. 

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In do a lot of multi-tasking, moving between multiple programs and on and off line work. And use statistical packages like SPSS. And stream vidoes.

 

I think I would notice it if a machine were less fast than what I have now.

 

I do manage to overload my existing computer sometimes now,  causing the dreaded swirling disk of death, though not sure if that is down to the processor or the memory.

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16 hours ago, steve187 said:

the i5 scores higher in tests

Of speed? 

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When considering a new MBP, it doesn't help to compare the new 2019 processor and its speed to

your 7 year old machine, which will have a far older and less advanced processor. 

 

This is a great site that lists every Mac model and its processor....a great reference.

 

https://everymac.com/ultimate-mac-comparison-chart/

 

The 2019 processors will be faster, more energy efficient and just handle complex tasks

with greater ease.

 

Not everyone subscribes to this because of cost but I always customise my MBP to feature

the highest configuration (not on storage space though)....which means I go for the i7 version.

And max out the RAM to as high as they offer. It adds cost but gets you a machine that stays 

relavant for longer. Of course, if you're just surfing and sending emails or writing articles, then

the base model is fine.

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20 hours ago, Sheryl said:

In do a lot of multi-tasking, moving between multiple programs and on and off line work. And use statistical packages like SPSS. And stream vidoes.

 

I think I would notice it if a machine were less fast than what I have now.

 

I do manage to overload my existing computer sometimes now,  causing the dreaded swirling disk of death, though not sure if that is down to the processor or the memory.

 
 
 
 
Copy the link to share What is Processor Speed and Why Does It Matter?
 

What is Processor Speed and Why Does It Matter?

Sophie Sirois
|
December 18, 2018
With technology, increased productivity goals, faster internet, and more devices, we’ve created a need for speed wherever we go. We’re used to getting results instantaneously and expect our devices to keep up with our requests as we multi-task our way through life. Computer processors and their clock speed are two features we most commonly associate with high-performing, fast technology.
 
Computer processor speed (CPU speed) is one of the most important elements to consider when comparing computers. The CPU is often referred to as “the brain” of your computer, so ensuring it’s working properly is very important to the longevity and functionality of your computer. Understanding what makes a good processor speed starts with understanding what exactly a processor does - and what its components do to improve the functionality of your computer.
 
Let’s break down the specifics of what makes your CPU fast, cores versus clock speeds, what makes them important, and what to look for when buying a new computer.

What is a PC processor and what does it do?

A central processing unit, or CPU, is a piece of hardware that enables your computer to interact with all of the applications and programs installed. A CPU interprets the program’s instructions and creates the output that you interface with when you’re using a computer.
 
A processor is made up of hardware that works together to deliver information, allowing your computer to complete the tasks that you request when you open an application or make changes to a file. Whether it processes quickly or painfully slowly can make a big impact on your computing experience.
 
Processor cores and clock speeds determine how much information can be received at a time, and how quickly that information can be processed on your computer. The speed at which your computer’s cores and clock speed work together is considered its processing speed.

Processor cores versus clock speed

Processor cores and clock speed are very different functions, but they’re working toward the same goal. Many techies talk about which you should give more weight to when buying a computer - but they depend on each other equally to help your computer function at its best.
 
Knowing the differences between the two can help you get a better idea of what each does and what kind of processor speed you need depending on how you’re planning to use your computer. If you’re planning to use your computer for complex video editing rather than just for standard programs and internet browsing, you will have different processor core and clock speed requirements. Let’s explore these two technologies and the numbers you’ll want to look out for when comparing computers.

What is a processor core?

Processor cores are individual processing units within the computer’s central processing unit (CPU). The processor core receives instructions from a single computing task, working with the clock speed to quickly process this information and temporarily store it in the Random Access Memory (RAM). Permanent information is saved to your hard drive when you request it.
 
Most computers now have multiple processor cores that enable your computer to complete multiple tasks at once. Having the ability to run numerous programs and request multiple tasks like making edits to a document, while watching a video, while opening a new program, is made possible with multiple processor core units.
 
For complex video games or programs, it is essential to have a CPU that can keep up with information like the audio and video feed being distributed rapidly. In a digital age where we’re all expert multi-taskers, processor cores have become increasingly important to computer users.
 
Multiple processor cores and hyper-threading technology are virtually essential in both gaming and everyday computers alike. Having multiple processor cores gives you the freedom to increase productivity at work, play complex video games, or explore a new world with virtual reality.

What is clock speed?

A computer’s processor clock speed determines how quickly the central processing unit (CPU) can retrieve and interpret instructions. This helps your computer complete more tasks by getting them done faster.
 
Clock speeds are measured in gigahertz (GHz), with a higher number equating to a higher clock speed. Multi-core processors were developed to help CPU’s run faster as it became more difficult to increase clock speed.
 
Faster clock speeds mean that you’ll see tasks ordered from your CPU completed quicker, making your experience seamless and reducing the time you wait to interface with your favorite applications and programs.
 
How much memory are you running currently?
 
Having enough DDR memory is very important. 
 
Edited by Isaanbiker

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20 hours ago, Sheryl said:

Many thanks, Matzzon.

 

I am actually now in Cambodia and was looking here, have not found the 2.4Ghz but now that I know it exists will look specifically for it.  I am fine with the speed I currently have (though faster is always nice...) just don't want to spend money only to downgrade! It surprises me that Apple is making newer models slower than old ones. Surely processor speed is a key feature for most people?

 

I had wanted to buy while still  in Cambodia because prices are lower and the sales people are (usually) better informed.  If I do need to resort to buying direct from Apple in Thailand do you know if they will pre-install software i.e. Microsoft Office for Mac? (I hate it but have no choice, have to share files with colleagues that use WIndows).

 

On 12/10/2019 at 4:37 PM, Sheryl said:

Thought to get a Macbook Pro 13" 2019 but was confused to find that it has only 1.6GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor whereas my old machine is 2.9 GHz Intel Core i7.


1st point the 2019 is faster than your old 2012 one as you can see from the benchmarks under

172A3345-1D75-47B0-A696-0BFFBE4A7AEA.thumb.png.0a395fd4b3fbcd11f88868e5b05aff62.png243CE4E3-496F-4E46-9771-A9C573028D15.thumb.png.3977bcf657cfbdfabeb168482e8b50f2.png
 

second point with Micro$oft orifice if you have an Office 365 account then the download and install is quite painless.

 

You may be able to schedule a Genius Bar appointment at the Apple store in Bangkok for them to walk you through the setup, though as I mentioned it isn’t difficult but will take time. Alternatively I’m sure there are plenty of people who will help for a consideration. I am too far north for you but it’s a job I’ve done occasionally.

 

if you have bought Office then it becomes a bit more difficult.

Edited by sometimewoodworker

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Thanks all.

 

I have neither bought Office nor have an Office 365 account. I got Office for Mac  pre-installed  when I bought my old computer and if possible would like to do the same this round though not absolutely essential.

 

Thanks for the various  inks. What "Turbo charge" does is one of the things I tried asking at the shops as I assumed it meant that when needed the computer would process at the speed indicated but I could not get a coherent answer other than they all said the new machine would be slower.

Which I found dubious.

 

Looks to me like if I buy a 2.4GHz 4 core that turbo charges to  4.1GHz I should definitely get better speeds when multitasking and perhaps equivalent speed when single tasking, is that right? For that matter even a 1.4 four core that turbos up to 3.9 should be better though perhaps not by much?

 

Re memory I have 8 RAM. Strorage is 750Gb but after 8 years of use I have used a little  less than 2 (and that without being good about deleting unnecessary files) so 256 storage should work.  Would I need more than 8 RAM/would it make a difference/is it easily added?

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Understand.......FIRST......the current latest Model and Processor......... use your are not buying a new older model that didn’t sell and Ben siting on the shelf for a few years

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5 hours ago, Sheryl said:

Of speed? 

Speed is not always the goal, but also heat (power consumption that is about on time charge battery life) is another that has to be considered. Heat cause other problems too. Designers have to consider different factors regarding the motherboard. 

If they used i7 does not mean that it was a great choice. 

Edited by The Theory

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I just purchased a Mac Pro 2.8 GH with the Intel Core i7. If you are purchasing one in Thailand, they only carry the Intel Core i5 everywhere I went. So I had to order it through the local Apple store and I received it from them in 2 weeks. 

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processor isnt the bottleneck, RAM & hdd are.

guessing you arent heavy into games so those are the bottlenecks,

id get as much RAM as my budget will get me and dont bother

with the rest, save for multiple USB ports

Edited by brokenbone
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