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scottiddled

Thais drivers calling because they can't read a map (taxi, Grab, delivery)

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11 minutes ago, CharlieH said:

Ever considered they are checking to see if you are home ? so they dont make a wasted journey to deliver that parcel ? Many of these delivery drivers get paid by the item and if its not delivered they dont get paid twice to come back another day.

 

Likewise for the Taxi driver, telling you he is near, gets you ready to leave, and him not wasting time waiting for you to get yourself together.

Delivery drivers always call me to see if I'm home. Some of the less experienced ones call for directions too. I had one today calling me. Not a hassle but never know if it works.

 

I like the app grab and thankfully they almost never call about it. Nice to have food delivered without much hassle.

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23 hours ago, CharlieH said:

Ever considered they are checking to see if you are home ? so they dont make a wasted journey to deliver that parcel ? Many of these delivery drivers get paid by the item and if its not delivered they dont get paid twice to come back another day.

 

Likewise for the Taxi driver, telling you he is near, gets you ready to leave, and him not wasting time waiting for you to get yourself together.

Good point about parcel delivery. If it's Ikea calling to make sure I'll be home in an hour, that's fine. 

 

I was writing more about food delivery drivers calling 2 minutes after you order. Sometimes they even ask to confirm what was ordered, which is weird. 

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13 minutes ago, Lacessit said:

I don't think many Thais are taught to read a map. The people in my GF's village can't.

Perhaps certain elements in Thailand feel more comfortable knowing few of the poorer Thais can find them.

Its not just village Thais who cant. In our office i would say its 50/50 on those who could or not and most of these are chula, thammasat, mahidol, assumption graduates. Its just not a skill they teach at school anymore.

 

Having said that i bet you could ask a group of 30 and unders in your home country and the number proficient in map reading would be far lower than 10-20 years ago.

 

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, smutcakes said:

Its not just village Thais who cant. In our office i would say its 50/50 on those who could or not and most of these are chula, thammasat, mahidol, assumption graduates. Its just not a skill they teach at school anymore.

 

Having said that i bet you could ask a group of 30 and unders in your home country and the number proficient in map reading would be far lower than 10-20 years ago.

 

 

 

 

You may be right. Skills in demand change with the times.

I'm tertiary-educated, but I'm damn sure there are subjects at secondary level now where I would be dunce of the class.

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Different skill sets for different environments. When I was a kid there were always road maps around as my Dad did a fair bit of driving and as usual you tend to pick up skills without realising it, especially at a young age. I suspect there weren't that many road maps around for the local villagers all those years ago and ergo no kids to be curious about what Dad was looking at.

It applies equally the other way. I haven't met many Thais who don't know how to open a coconut or a durian in double quick time but I sure as heck have trouble doing it. How about you?

 

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I think it also has to do with people booking the service and sending a wrong location.

Many people don't know where they are living if you show them a map, so if their phone is locating the wrong location (not surprising when being indoors and trying to use GPS), the location might be off by a street or two. Especially in a city like Bangkok this could easily cost the taxi driver 15 minutes. So he calls to make sure that the location which you sent him is correct.

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7 hours ago, jackdd said:

I think it also has to do with people booking the service and sending a wrong location.

Many people don't know where they are living if you show them a map, so if their phone is locating the wrong location (not surprising when being indoors and trying to use GPS), the location might be off by a street or two. Especially in a city like Bangkok this could easily cost the taxi driver 15 minutes. So he calls to make sure that the location which you sent him is correct.

Jack,

 

That's a fair point. I guess I hadn't thought of it that way.

 

But just bear in mind what that'd mean: it'd mean that someone in my shoes, who gives accurate location/address, is getting called just because the rest of society is unreliable. So, take away some of the blame from the driver, who might think it's due diligence to ask, and shift it to Somchai who can't pinpoint where he lives?

 

That might be valid in some situations. I still don't buy it for booking a Grab, but I can see some scenarios where it's a factor.

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On 1/9/2020 at 4:05 PM, scottiddled said:

These drivers are able to see the customer name--and the name sure isn't Thai. Do they expect a fluent farang?

From which country do you come? If there the delivery drivers read a foreign name, what do you think would they do? Expecting that the customer understands the language of the country or wouldn´t they call? 

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16 hours ago, CNXexpat said:

From which country do you come? If there the delivery drivers read a foreign name, what do you think would they do? Expecting that the customer understands the language of the country or wouldn´t they call? 

Interesting point, but there are major differences between Western countries and Thailand.

 

I come from a country where people with all sorts of diverse-looking names live as citizens. They can almost all speak the primary language. So you wouldn't really look at a name and think "they can't speak the language."

 

Still, online/app culture is such that an Uber/Grab driver, food delivery driver, etc. is unlikely to want/need to call to clarify where to go. They have the address and can read a map. Their phones give them directions. They trust that when someone orders a meal online, they got the order right and you don't need to call them to confirm (kind of defeats the purpose of ordering online and not calling to begin with).

 

And if someone visiting my country doesn't speak the language, they're far less likely to be ordering things online that require a phone conversation from the driver anyway. How would they figure out how to order (the website isn't in their language). In contrast, a significant portion of the people in Thailand at any given moment are non-Thai (many of them non-Asian) and speak English (or Mandarin, or Russian...). Their names look drastically different from Thai names. If you're a Grab driver in Bangkok and a white girl's face pops up with a name like Jane Smith, chances are better than not they're not going to speak much Thai. 

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4 hours ago, scottiddled said:

Interesting point, but there are major differences between Western countries and Thailand.

 

I come from a country where people with all sorts of diverse-looking names live as citizens. They can almost all speak the primary language. So you wouldn't really look at a name and think "they can't speak the language."

 

Still, online/app culture is such that an Uber/Grab driver, food delivery driver, etc. is unlikely to want/need to call to clarify where to go. They have the address and can read a map. Their phones give them directions. They trust that when someone orders a meal online, they got the order right and you don't need to call them to confirm (kind of defeats the purpose of ordering online and not calling to begin with).

 

And if someone visiting my country doesn't speak the language, they're far less likely to be ordering things online that require a phone conversation from the driver anyway. How would they figure out how to order (the website isn't in their language). In contrast, a significant portion of the people in Thailand at any given moment are non-Thai (many of them non-Asian) and speak English (or Mandarin, or Russian...). Their names look drastically different from Thai names. If you're a Grab driver in Bangkok and a white girl's face pops up with a name like Jane Smith, chances are better than not they're not going to speak much Thai. 

If I am in California or Florida, don´t speak English but Spanish, the website where I order is also in Spanish, can I expect that the delivery man speaks also Spanish? 

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