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cornishcarlos

2 way handheld radios..

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Hi,

 

Is there any restriction on the use of 2 way radios ?? I bought some back from U.K for our staff to use in the restaurant, just comms between kitchen and servers etc

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Nestling-Rechargeable-Talkies-Earpieces-Survival/dp/B07RHYP9NV/ref=mp_s_a_1_9?keywords=2+way+radio&qid=1578660308&sprefix=2+way&sr=8-9

 

Thanks

Edited by cornishcarlos

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Radio transmitters are a restricted import category. To import you need a permit from the Office of The National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission. This will only be granted if the transmitters operate in the correct frequency band for Thailand.

 

Or you can buy the devices in Thailand knowing someone else had done all the hard work for you 

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10 hours ago, blackcab said:

Radio transmitters are a restricted import category. To import you need a permit from the Office of The National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission. This will only be granted if the transmitters operate in the correct frequency band for Thailand.

 

Or you can buy the devices in Thailand knowing someone else had done all the hard work for you 

 

Or I can just bring them in my hand luggage 🤪

I'm not really concerned unless I start hearing police chatter whilst ordering my lunch !!

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On 1/11/2020 at 7:49 AM, cornishcarlos said:

Or I can just bring them in my hand luggage

You risk having them confiscated at the very least.  

It looks like the ones you are interested in are PMR446 which covers band 446.0–446.2 MHz

I think these are available in Thailand at Amorn stores  they are  coloured red and don't need a licence...the other black coloured radios they sell.....ohh hold on

 

Wiki says

Quote

Thailand has two 80 channel CB-style services, one in mid-band VHF 78 MHz band and another at high-band VHF 245 MHz band. Both services use FM mode only. Per Thai law, 78 MHz transceivers must have a yellow case. 245 MHz transceivers must have a red case. The HF (26 – 27 MHz band) CB service is not allowed in Thailand. 78 MHz takes the place of traditional 27 MHz CB for truckers, etc.

The 78 MHz CB allocation is primarily used by mobile and base stations, although handheld radios for 78 MHz are available. The lower frequency allows for longer communication range in rural and suburban areas compared to the 245 MHz service. 78 MHz is popular with trucking companies, buses, taxi companies and other transportation users, often in conjunction with 245 MHz. This service is commonly referred to as "CB78", "VHF78", "CB 78MHz" or simply "78 MHz". Frequency allocation is between 78.0000 and 78.9875 MHz. Channels are spaced 12.5 kHz apart for a total of 80 channels in straight numerical sequence (channel 1 is 78.0000 MHz, channel 80 is 78.9875 MHz). Units are allowed up to 10 watts PEP RF power. External high-gain antennas are permitted. Base station antennas are permitted and base stations are commonly found in this band. Use of selective calling and tone squelch systems such as DTMF, CTCSS and DCS are allowed. According to Thai law, transceivers operating on the 78 MHz band must have a yellow case.

The 245 MHz CB allocation is more popular than the 78 MHz service, especially in urban areas. This service is commonly referred to as "CB245", "VHF245" or "VHF CB 245 MHz". Frequency allocation is between 245.0000 and 245.9875 MHz. Channels are spaced 12.5 kHz apart for a total of 80 channels in straight numerical sequence (channel 1 is 245.0000 MHz, channel 80 is 245.9875 MHz). Units are allowed up to 10 watts PEP RF power. External high-gain antennas are permitted. Base station antennas are permitted. Besides personal use, the equipment is used by search and rescue organizations, businesses, security guards, taxi companies and delivery services. In urban areas, simplex repeaters, usually mounted on the roofs of high-rise buildings, are used to increase communication range. CTCSS and DCS are often used due to heavy channel congestion in urban areas. Operating rules are less restrictive than amateur radio service, with an initial license fee required. According to Thai law, transceivers operating on the 245 MHz band must have a red case. There are an estimated one million users of the 245 MHz VHF CB service, often in large cities.[15]

 

So the red ones are 245 MHZ  doesn't look like 446.0–446.2 MHz would be legal  without an operating licence  and god know who else shares that band/ who you would be interfering with ?

 

 

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A post containing a link to another forum has been removed, it was an old topic anyway. 

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7 hours ago, johng said:

You risk having them confiscated at the very least

 

I already bought them back from U.K after Xmas !! Been using them in the restaurant since with no interference or any back ground chatter 😉 Just interested to know if my staff might get arrested and never seen again ??

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