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Ubol Ratana Dam at lowest level in 40 years

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Ubol Ratana Dam at lowest level in 40 years

By THE NATION

 

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Ubol Ratana Dam in Khon Kaen province was at 19 per cent of capacity on Friday (January 17) with 472 million cubic metres in the reservoir – its lowest level in 40 years.

 

Concern is rising over the impact on surrounding farmland and fish habitats.

 

Rice farmer and fisherman Sawang NuayKiao said the water level at the dam, which opened in 1966, has steadily dropped, as has the number of fish he can catch every day.

 

“I used to sell Bt200-Bt300 worth of fish a day. Now I’m only catching Bt100-Bt200 worth.”

 

Nor is he able to grow as much rice as he once did, he said, due to limitations in irrigation.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30380721

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-01-17
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But do you know how much water the countless sugar factories use in your country? And where do they get this water from? From the people's reservations, be ashamed!
If then I see how much water is wasted to "wash" the streets especially if one of the many ministers decides to make an inspection.
Then explain to your people that one shower a day is more than enough, we grew up with one shower a week and, we survived, I met people here in Thailand that two, three or more times a day take a shower, this is the I call disrespect for the rest of the population!

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5 hours ago, saikaial said:

It was only a few months ago that the Dam was over 100% of maximum and areas were flooded.

...

Are you sure ?

Wasn't this in October 2017 ?

 

Edited by willi2006
clarification

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Another inflammatory baiting post has been removed. 

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On 1/19/2020 at 6:26 AM, CGW said:

This reservoir isn't far from me, so know the history to some extent, dredging would obviously help, though it is a huge area!

In 2017 there was a huge storm in this area, the reservoir was full, enough for a good few years, unfortunately this "dam"(which is owned by the power company!) also produces electricity, a lot of the reserves were "wasted" to produce power, just another area of the infrastructure that should" be looked at.

I would add, that if the dam hadn't been drained and there had been another storm the year after the whole area would obviously have been flooded, then there would have been cries of ineptitude! dealing with mother natures fickleness is never easy!

Dredging would help for future years, but the question is, who would pay and would it be worth the cost? Very few comprehensive, accurate and honest cost-benefit analyses done in Thai water resources management projects, so no one really knows the answer to the question, until such studies are done. The extra water from dredging would probably be worth it for supplying the city and domestic water users, as they actually pay for it, but it wouldn't be worth it for rice irrigation in the dry season I suspect, as these farmers don't pay for their water and the crop value is very low. But with higher value crops the question of paying for water supply gets more interesting. 

In reality, I suspect it will be the taxpayer who stumps up the cost, and the users will get away scot free for the capital or maintenance cost of these dam and reservoir systems, as usual.

The worst thing that could happen is that EGAT (owners) start dredging in the area still with some water, as I have seen this done before, and it can cause the water just to drain away into the sub-soil (which is presently dry), as the reservoir fine clayey sediments can act like a non-porous container. Remove this layer, and the water just seeps away into the earth, leaving the reservoir more empty than at present......

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On 1/18/2020 at 12:58 PM, 30la said:

But do you know how much water the countless sugar factories use in your country? And where do they get this water from? From the people's reservations, be ashamed!
If then I see how much water is wasted to "wash" the streets especially if one of the many ministers decides to make an inspection.
Then explain to your people that one shower a day is more than enough, we grew up with one shower a week and, we survived, I met people here in Thailand that two, three or more times a day take a shower, this is the I call disrespect for the rest of the population!

I am interested to know what country you grew up in (re: your ref to one shower a week).?

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