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BGRIM-Energy China consortium to build world's largest hydro-floating solar  project for Egat

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BGRIM-Energy China consortium to build world's largest hydro-floating solar  project for Egat

By The Nation

 

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The consortium of BGRIM Power – Energy China , comprising  B Grimm Power Plc (BGRIM) and China Energy Engineering Group Shanxi Electric Power Engineering Co Ltd. (Energy China) has signed a EPC contract to build the world's largest hydro-floating solar hybrid project for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat).

 

The consortium of BGRIM Power – Energy China , comprising  B Grimm Power Plc (BGRIM) and China Energy Engineering Group Shanxi Electric Power Engineering Co Ltd. (Energy China) has signed a EPC contract to build the world's largest hydro-floating solar hybrid project for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat).

 

Under the Power Development Plan BE 2561-2580 (PDP2018), the first hydro-floating solar hybrid project has been implemented by Egat at Sirindhorn Dam. BGRIMM Power – Energy China consortium as selected bidder with the deal worth over Bt842 million, will construct and install a 45-MW solar power plant on water surface combining with existing hydropower of Egat.

 

Implementing this project is an important co-friendly energy scheme that will encourage and strengthen the kingdom's security of power supply.

Egat's Director Gen Somsak Rungsita, Deputy Permanent Secretary for Defence, representing Egat's board of directors presided over the signing ceremony attended by Thepparat Theppitak, Egat Deputy Governor (Power Plant Development and Renewable Energy), BGRIM Chairman Dr Harald Link, BGRIM CEO Preeyanart Soontornwata, and  Wang Xinping, Chairman of Energy China at the Centara Grand at Central Plaza Ladprao Bangkok.

 

Gen Somsak said the project creates synergy between solar and hydro power, representing an important step in the development of green energy in Thailand and resolve an uncertain electricity supply from renewable energy.

 

This project’s development is consistent with the government's policy to support electricity production from renewable energy and reduce dependence on fossil fuels for electricity generation according to the current Power Development Plan of Thailand (PDP2018).

 

Thepparat said the hybrid hydro-floating solar for Sirindhorn Dam and the  solar power plant generate power from sunlight during the day, along with output control  by the Energy Management System (EMS), allow continuous generation of electricity which will enhance reliability of the country's overall power supply.

 

In the future, an energy storage system would potentially be applied with the project to increase  reliability  for renewable energy production.

The solar panels selected for the project are crystalline double glass module which is suitable for being installed on the surface of water, also the solar panels, inverters and cables will be installed on HDPE plastic floating platform, with UV resistance ability. It is eco-friendly, not dangerous to the environment and aquatic animals. The project will be installed on  a surface area of 450 rai at low cost of investment by sharing facilities with the existing transmission system, transformers, and high voltage substations etc.

 

The project is expected to complete within 12 months from now and commercial operation date (COD) was set in December 2020.

 

BGRIM Chairman Dr Link said that entering into this contract marks another milestone for BGRIM to demonstrate its potential in engaging all dimensions of energy development.

 

He noted that the hydro-floating solar hybrid project at Sirindhorn Dam is regarded as a major step in the development of renewable energy in Thailand.

 

It also enables BGRIM to increase the potential and standards in the development of robust renewable energy business and serving government's policies. Our participation in this project will open up opportunities for other floating solar projects.

 

In partnership with a global partner, Energy China,  one of the world’s largest comprehensive energy solutions provider and a major state owned- conglomerate of the People Republic of China with high potential and cost-effective advantages in procurement, allows the highest standard of engineering and of construction. We, the consortium, is confident that the project will achieve COD with international benchmark, Dr Link added.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/business/30380841

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-01-21
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Can you say "debt trap"?

 

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Just wait a year until the water quality here starts to corrode/rot every piece of metal in the system.

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This is good news, but who will be doing the maintenance?

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Has anyone done an environmental impact study of this project? I know. I know.

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On 1/21/2020 at 3:33 AM, webfact said:

Energy China,  one of the world’s largest comprehensive energy solutions provider and a major state owned- conglomerate of the People Republic of China

Can Thailand NOT build any energy, rail and road infrastructure without China state-owned enterprises? I doubt the reverse is true  - China doesn't need Thailand state-owned enterprises operating in China.

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Electricity, Water, Thailand......what could possibly go wrong.

regards worgeordie

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On 1/21/2020 at 11:14 AM, justin case said:

why floating, not enough land available in thailand ???

Future proofing against rising sea levels :coffee1:

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On 1/21/2020 at 6:41 AM, zydeco said:

Has anyone done an environmental impact study of this project? I know. I know.

They probably have and come to the foregone conclusion that it is environmentally benign. EIAs, paid for by the developers, always come up with the same conclusions, just like the dams these solar schemes will be built on. No intellectual independence or ethical practice allowed in this industry. Apart from all the HDPE plastic involved in the floating platforms (is that considered environmentally friendly?), the first question I'd ask is how much will covering 450 rai of water surface in panels that capture incoming solar radiation lead to a decline in primary productivity of the reservoir and how much impact will this have on the aquatic food chain, especially fish productivity? To pretend this activity is "eco-friendly", as the article claims, is to be willfully ignorant. 

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On 1/21/2020 at 9:40 AM, AJBangkok said:

Land costs money to buy or lease and clear and prepare, also requires continual upkeep in clearance and drainage, and it costs around $250k per KM for a transmission line to the grid plus the equipment and annual leasing cost of the land under the transmission line.

 

The water behind the dam is free, and the transmission lines are already there to plug into. In a nutshell it’s cheaper and easier to execute. An average assumption of the cost of building a solar farm is $1 Million per megawatt so 45mw would equal $45m and this project is 45mw for about $28 million.

Not sure if the 80% output point means total replacement or not.

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16 hours ago, worgeordie said:

Electricity, Water, Thailand......what could possibly go wrong.

regards worgeordie

I second this comment - Be Grim is not an auspicious name for a power company.

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On 1/26/2020 at 8:21 AM, Srikcir said:

Can Thailand NOT build any energy, rail and road infrastructure without China state-owned enterprises? I doubt the reverse is true  - China doesn't need Thailand state-owned enterprises operating in China.

You don't follow the new geography, Thailand is in China now.

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They will learn a hard lesson when dealing with the Chinese as many other countries have, all these cheap loans come at a very high price they don't want you to pay it back they want to forclose on the loan then they own you 

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