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Ancient statue found carved in rock in Siem Reap

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Siem Reap Provincial Environment Department officials and archaeologists are conducting research on a large Makara animal statue carved on a rock at the Phnom Kulen National Park in Siem Reap province’s Svay Loeu district.

 

Provincial Department of Environment director Sun Kong said yesterday the head portion of the broken statue was found by a resident on Saturday and the officials went to inspect the site on Sunday. He added that the statue was made of sandstone during the sixth century and the body was broken into pieces, noting that officials found 13 pieces of the body nearby the site.

 

Mr Kong said: “According to the experts, this Makara animal statue is one that we have never seen before. It is approximately 2.14 metres in length and about 0.97 metres high. We have not yet moved the body parts or excavated the head from the site and have told park rangers in the area to guard it in order for officials from relevant ministries and institutions to come and study in detail about the site’s history and reconstruct the pieces.”

 

read more https://www.khmertimeskh.com/50681625/ancient-statue-found-carved-in-rock-in-siem-reap

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This is an incredibly interesting discovery. Well done and may it be successfully preserved.

 

Also interesting is that thus far I am the only member to comment. I have noticed in the past that Thaivisa members rarely comment or post when the subject is art or history etc.

 

Come on members, show that you are curious about more than bars, girls, beer and ladyboys.

 

OK I am ready to be shot down. Go for it.

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Not much to say, would have been more interesting if a photo of the head was posted without me having to follow links.

 

Quick look for Makara beast finds this (Makara is a Hindu word for a mythical sea dragon)

Makara.jpg

 

Which reminds me of a statue called 'mom' at Wat Doi Suthep temple where it's called a Dtuwamaum beast.

mom.jpg

Edited by BritManToo
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I note that the article proclaims that "the statue was made of sandstone during the sixth century". This 4 days after the discovery of the item.

 

Which, timewise, strikes me as the Cambodian archaeological equivalent of a Royal Thai Police announcement of the guilty party some 2 hours after the crime was discovered.

 

Does not the laboratory testing process for ancient artifacts take just a little longer than that?

 

 

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"Makara" also means January in Khmer. And there's a district in Phnom Penh called 7 January or 7 Makara. 

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3 hours ago, Trentham said:

This is an incredibly interesting discovery. Well done and may it be successfully preserved.

 

Also interesting is that thus far I am the only member to comment. I have noticed in the past that Thaivisa members rarely comment or post when the subject is art or history etc.

 

Come on members, show that you are curious about more than bars, girls, beer and ladyboys.

 

OK I am ready to be shot down. Go for it.

It's a little known historic fact that the Makara were actually bar girls of the 6th century.  People had different tastes in those times.

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I have visited the Kulen National Park and it is a truly fascinating place, including a very popular waterfall. Being in the mountains, it provides a welcome break from the heat and humidity of Siem Reap.

This is the discovery (from the link):-

 

Use-this-Environmentalist-in-Siem-Reap-found-a-statue-in-Kulen-mountain-1.jpg

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3 hours ago, mfd101 said:

I note that the article proclaims that "the statue was made of sandstone during the sixth century". This 4 days after the discovery of the item.

 

Which, timewise, strikes me as the Cambodian archaeological equivalent of a Royal Thai Police announcement of the guilty party some 2 hours after the crime was discovered.

 

Does not the laboratory testing process for ancient artifacts take just a little longer than that?

 

 

c'mon, it's not that bad.

 

the intertubes sez makaras (makarii?) were common decorative articles from the 1st-7th centuries.

should be simple enough to determine the material is sandstone.

they could have quote-mined a statement from the antiquities ministry or called a local university.

details from the carving method might indicate an approximate date.

 

can't expect a fluff news item reporter to spend much time researching the details.

 

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Very interesting find, from the pic posted, I'm glad (most of) the head is still present.  I feared that the head was already sitting in the residence of some tycoon in Hong Kong or China.

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