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WHO says 'bit too early' to declare coronavirus a global emergency

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WHO says 'bit too early' to declare coronavirus a global emergency

By Stephanie Nebehay and Yawen Chen

 

2020-01-23T050441Z_1_LYNXMPEG0M0G0_RTROPTP_3_CHINA-HEALTH.JPG

Passengers wear masks to prevent an outbreak of a new coronavirus at the Hong Kong West Kowloon High Speed Train Station, in Hong Kong, China January 23, 2020. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

 

GENEVA/BEIJING (Reuters) - The World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday it was "a bit too early" to declare a new coronavirus a global health emergency as China put millions of people on lockdown amid an outbreak that has killed 18 people and infected more than 630.

 

Health officials fear the transmission rate could accelerate as hundreds of millions of Chinese travel at home and abroad during week-long holidays for the Lunar New Year, which begins on Saturday.

 

"It is a bit too early to consider that this is a public health emergency of international concern," the WHO Emergency Committee panel chair Didier Houssin said in Geneva.

 

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the organisation's Emergency Committee of 16 independent experts had been divided in its conclusion.

 

"Make no mistake, though, this is an emergency in China. But it has not yet become a global health emergency. It may yet become one," said Tedros.

 

He said China had taken measures which it believes are appropriate.

 

"We hope they will be both effective and short in their duration... For the moment, the WHO does not recommend any broader restrictions on travel or trade."

 

China's decision to lock down Wuhan, a city of 11 million people, shows how committed the authorities are to contain a viral outbreak that emerged in a seafood market there, a World Health Organization representative in Beijing said on Thursday.

 

Peter Piot, a professor of Global Health and Director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said the outbreak was at a critical phase.

 

"Regardless of the decision not to declare this a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, intensified international collaboration and more resources will be crucial to stopping this outbreak in its tracks. National authorities and the World Health Organisation will need to continue to monitor developments very closely."

 

Giving details on infections in China, Chinese state television said 634 cases had been confirmed. By the end of Wednesday, China's National Health Commission confirmed 17 dead in the central province of Hubei.

 

Health authorities in Hebei, just south of Beijing, said on Thursday an 80-year-old man infected with the coronavirus had died there, marking the first confirmed death outside Hubei.

 

The previously unknown virus strain is believed to have emerged late last year from illegally traded wildlife at an animal market in the capital of Hubei province, Wuhan.

 

Most transport in Wuhan, a city of 11 million people, was suspended on Thursday and people were told not to leave. Hours later, neighbouring Huanggang, a city of about 7 million people, announced a similar lockdown.

 

"The lockdown of 11 million people is unprecedented in public health history," said Gauden Galea, the WHO's representative in Beijing.

 

The newly identified coronavirus has created alarm because there are a number of unknowns surrounding it. It is too early to know just how dangerous it is and how easily it spreads between people.

 

There is no vaccine for the virus, which can spread through respiratory transmission. Symptoms include fever, difficulty breathing and coughing, similar to many other respiratory illnesses.

 

Three research teams are to start work on developing a vaccine, a global coalition set up to fight diseases said.

 

As well as restricting movement, Wuhan plans to build a new hospital in six days to treat patients, Beijing News reported, citing a construction company source.

 

Other cities were also taking steps to contain the virus.

 

Nearby Ezhou shut train stations. Beijing cancelled large gatherings, including two Lunar New Year temple fairs, and closed the Forbidden City, the capital's most famous tourist attraction, to visitors until further notice.

 

The U.S. State Department warned travellers to exercise increased caution in China as airports worldwide were screening passengers arriving from the country. Five people were being tested in Scotland for coronavirus and one person in Belfast showing symptoms was being treated, Sky News reported.

 

Chinese-ruled Hong Kong, which has two confirmed cases, is turning two holiday camps into quarantine stations as a precaution.

Taiwan has banned anyone from Wuhan from going to the island.

 

Chinese people had their own ways of protecting themselves.

 

"I go straight to where I need to go, and then I go home," said 79-year-old Li Meihua, from behind a mask, on the streets of Shanghai. "I'm also maintaining a cleaner diet, I've turned vegetarian."

 

(Reporting by Yawen Chen, Se Young Lee, Sophie Yu and Gabriel Crossley in Beijing, Sam Shen and Engen Tham in Shanghai, Ben Blanchard in Taiwan, Alison Lui and Donny Kwok in Hong Kong, John Geddie and Aradhana Aravindan in Singapore, Stephanie Nebehay in Geneva, and Kate Kelland and Elizabeth Howcroft in London; Writing by Alison Williams and Nick Macfie; Editing by Janet Lawrence and Rosalba O'Brien)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-01-24

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Ok, they are the experts...

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I guess all those rich, entitled and enabled attendees at Davos, some of whose vested interests would take a monumental hit if a global pandemic was officially recognized, need a few extra days to ensure their flight plans aren't disrupted and their money is safe.

 

Note to investors; the time to get into pharmaco's that manufacture flu vaccines is NOW!

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There is an interactive live update  map that reveals it has spread beyond Wuhan as far as Latin America .

 

https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

 

Not sure how accurate as when you click on Austrlia in the left tool bar it jumps to Saipan?

 

The source is John Hopkins a respected US University.

https://systems.jhu.edu/

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6 cases in the UK and Thailand only one or two

 

seriously ?

 

I think someone is telling porkies

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It's too early to call. The Chinese authorities are behaving a bit more responsibly than they did during the SARS outbreak, so hopefully the World can take control of this problem and eliminate it.

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2 minutes ago, smedly said:

6 cases in the UK and Thailand only one or two

 

seriously ?

 

I think someone is telling porkies

The UK is not confirmed, just suspected.

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Troll post removed.

 

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Not many died so far at all. Hardly a pandemic. Media hype.

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1 hour ago, Roy Baht said:

No cases in South America, Africa, Antarctica. Not global.

Yep. And South America and Africa. No fear of officials delaying reporting (if they are even capable of it) or sweeping things under the rug there, of course.

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Everyone can rest easy now. 

Quote

“We have it totally under control,” Trump told “Squawk Box” co-host Joe Kernen in an interview from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “It’s one person coming in from China. We have it under control. It’s going to be just fine.”   https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/22/trump-on-coronavirus-from-china-we-have-it-totally-under-control.html

And with that comment, stocks rebounded. Entirely coincidental, naturally.

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