Jump to content
BANGKOK
webfact

World Court orders Myanmar to protect Rohingya from acts of genocide

Recommended Posts

World Court orders Myanmar to protect Rohingya from acts of genocide

By Stephanie van den Berg and Ruma Paul

 

2020-01-23T105823Z_1_LYNXMPEG0M13N_RTROPTP_4_MYANMAR-ROHINGYA-WORLD-COURT-FILE.JPG

Minister for the Office of the State Counsellor of Myanmar, Kyaw Tint Swe, attends the ruling in a case filed by Gambia against Myanmar alleging genocide against the minority Muslim Rohingya population, at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague, Netherlands January 23, 2020. REUTERS/Eva Plevier

 

THE HAGUE/COX'S BAZAAR, Bangladesh (Reuters) - The International Court of Justice on Thursday ordered Myanmar to take urgent measures to protect its Rohingya population from genocide, a ruling cheered by refugees as their first major legal victory since being forced from their homes.

 

A lawsuit launched by Gambia in November at the United Nations' highest body for disputes between states accuses Myanmar of genocide against Rohingya in violation of a 1948 convention.

 

The court's final decision could take years, and Thursday's ruling dealt only with Gambia's request for preliminary measures. But in a unanimous ruling by the 17 judge panel, the court said the Rohingya face an ongoing threat and Myanmar must act to protect them.

 

Myanmar must "take all measures within its power to prevent all acts" prohibited under the 1948 Genocide Convention, and report back within four months, presiding Judge Abdulqawi Yusuf said, reading out a summary of the judgment.

 

Myanmar must use its influence over its military and other armed groups to prevent violence against the Rohingya "intended to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part".

 

Rohingya activists, who had come from all over the world to the Hague, reacted with joy to the unanimous ruling which also explicitly recognised their ethnic minority as a protected group under the Genocide Convention.

 

"That is something we have been fighting for a long time: to be recognised as humans the same as everyone else," Yasmin Ullah, a Canada-based Rohingya activist said. Majority Buddhist Myanmar generally refuses to describe the Muslim Rohingya as an ethnic group and refers to them as Bangladeshi migrants.

 

Myanmar's ministry of foreign affairs said in a statement late on Thursday it "takes note" of the decision.

 

"The unsubstantiated condemnation of Myanmar by some human rights actors has presented a distorted picture of the situation in Rakhine and affected Myanmar’s bilateral relations with several countries", it added.

 

More than 730,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar after a military-led crackdown in 2017, and were forced into squalid camps across the border in Bangladesh. U.N. investigators concluded that the military campaign had been executed with "genocidal intent".

 

In camps in Bangladesh where they have fled, Rohingya refugees hovered over mobile phones to watch the judgment.

 

“For the first time, we have got some justice," said Mohammed Nur, 34. "This is a big achievement for the entire Rohingya community.”

 

Rohingya still living inside Myanmar contacted by phone said they hoped the ruling would force the country to improve their situation. "We need protection," said Tin Aung, a Rohingya leader living in Myebon township in central Rakhine state, where Muslims have been confined to camps since violence in 2012.

 

A Myanmar government spokesman and two military spokesmen did not answer calls from Reuters seeking comment.

 

The International Court of Justice has ordered Myanmar to take urgent measures to protect its Muslim Rohingya population from persecution and atrocities - and preserve evidence of alleged crimes against them. Joe Davies reports

 

'TRIUMPH'

Gambia's justice minister, Abubacarr Tambadou, hailed the ruling as "a triumph for international justice".

 

Mainly Muslim Gambia brought the case despite being located halfway around the world, on the argument that all nations have a universal legal duty to prevent genocide. Tambadou, a former prosecutor at a U.N. tribunal over the Rwanda genocide, took up the issue on behalf of the 57-member OIC group of Muslim states.

 

The case was argued last month by some of the world's top human rights lawyers, with Myanmar's civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi personally attending hearings at The Hague to ask judges to dismiss it.

 

Moments before the court began reading its ruling, the Financial Times published an article by Suu Kyi, in which she said war crimes may have been committed against Rohingya Muslims but refugees had exaggerated abuses.

 

Although ICJ rulings are final and binding, countries have occasionally flouted them, and the court has no formal mechanism to enforce them.

 

“The ICJ order to Myanmar to take concrete steps to prevent the genocide of the Rohingya is a landmark step to stop further atrocities against one of the world’s most persecuted people,” said Param-Preet Singh, associate international justice director at Human Rights Watch. “Concerned governments and UN bodies should now weigh in to ensure that the order is enforced...."

 

Yusuf, the presiding judge, said the court was not satisfied with Myanmar's own efforts "to facilitate the return of Rohingya refugees present in Bangladesh, to promote ethnic reconciliation, peace and stability in Rakhine State, and to make its military accountable for violations of international humanitarian and human rights law".

 

Myanmar will now have to regularly report on its efforts to protect the Rohingya from acts of genocide every six months until a final ruling in the case.

 

(Reporting by Stephanie van den Berg and Bart H. Meijer in The Hague, Ruma Paul in Cox's Bazar and Poppy McPherson in Yangon; Writing by Kevin Liffey and Anthony Deutsch; Editing by Peter Graff and Catherine Evans)

 

reuters_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-01-24
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately Burma like all the countries in SEA cannot give a flying <deleted> about what the rest of the world think

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, webfact said:

Myanmar will now have to regularly report on its efforts to protect the Rohingya from acts of genocide every six months until a final ruling in the case

I'm supposing the reports will be paid for by the UN? Myanmar can not be expected to bare the cost and probably shouldn't be held accountable for the accuracy of the reports either. The UN , ROFL.

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"smedly"maybe if the west americans mainly were to leave the muslim society to get on with their lives life on this planet may improve.and yes i know the iranians and iraqies have always been a problem,but in the past it was a local problem it took the us to escalate it.just my opinion thats all ,backstabbing muslims at every turn will never improve the situation.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, webfact said:

World Court orders Myanmar to protect Rohingya from acts of genocide

Why such 'infamous' world court, does not order Israel to stop to kill Palestinians and protect them from genocide!

Why such 'infamous' world court, does not order US to release and return all migrant childrens stolen from their parents, Since they are clearly sold to "caring families" that over 39% of cases Childs were abused for violences and pedophilia !

Shame on such mickey mouse court !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why doesn't the "world court" prosecute the United States for illegally entering into the Iraq war under false pretenses and killing hundreds of thousands of innocent? 

 

Seems the "world court" is very specific when it comes to which parts of the "world" they are able to mess with. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, canopus1969 said:

Unfortunately Burma like all the countries in SEA cannot give a flying <deleted> about what the rest of the world think

 

And neither does the US, Russia, China, India, etc etc etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, sucit said:

Why doesn't the "world court" prosecute the United States for illegally entering into the Iraq war under false pretenses and killing hundreds of thousands of innocent? 

 

Seems the "world court" is very specific when it comes to which parts of the "world" they are able to mess with. 

 

And why no prosecution of Turkey for their attacks on Kurds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, beavenlen said:

"smedly"maybe if the west americans mainly were to leave the muslim society to get on with their lives life on this planet may improve.and yes i know the iranians and iraqies have always been a problem,but in the past it was a local problem it took the us to escalate it.just my opinion thats all ,backstabbing muslims at every turn will never improve the situation.

 

The problem with your reasoning is that you ignore the expansionist dreams of certain Muslim countries; the fight between Sunni and Shia and the desire of many Muslim immigrants to force their religion on non Muslims in non Muslim countries.

 

I'm afraid leaving them alone doesn't mean they'll leave you alone!

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's unlikely that Burma will reform itself. Eventually this may well lead to disinvestment and cancelation of aid programs by all excepting ASEAN and China. So will becoming a Chinese protectorate be a better outcome than a climbdown from the fiction that Rohingyas do not exist? Can Suukyi find a way to mitigate the intense racism propagated by radical monks!! So far her "leadership" is falling short.

 

Maybe China can send peacekeepers to Rakhine and displace the Burmese army et al who seem incapable of peaceable intervention. One problem with this is that China does not favor the concept of autonomy which is where Rakhine should be headed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...