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MoU signed to provide Motorbike Café training to unemployed people

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MoU signed to provide Motorbike Café training to unemployed people

By THE NATION

 

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The Department of Skill Development has joined hands with corporate giant Nestle to train some 5,000 unemployed people to run Motorbike Café businesses within three years.

 

Department director-general Thawatchai Benjathikul and Sathawut Sahapanichkul, managing director of distribution at Nestle Thailand Co Ltd, signed a memorandum of understanding on Friday (January 24).

 

“This project aims to provide unemployed people with training on how to make a variety of beverages such as coffee, bubble tea, Italian soda and milkshake and sell them from a motorcycle,” said Thawatchai. “The 15-hour training course over two days will cover several topics from beverage-making, cost-calculation, bookkeeping as well as a motorcycle riding course.”

 

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The Department of Skill Development will be responsible for designing and providing training courses, while Nestle will provide equipment and raw materials. “Candidates can seek funding from Government Savings Bank, which is sponsoring the project, while the Thai Credit Guarantee Corporation will be the guarantor,” he added.

 

The first batch of Motorbike Café training will open for registration at Labour Skill Development Institute Area 13 in Bangkok on February 20-21. Each batch is limited to 50 candidates.

 

“This project aims to train 5,000 people over the three years [2020-22],” said Thawatchai. “In the first year, we will organise training at Labour Skill Development Institutes in 10 provinces -- Bangkok, Nonthaburi, Pathum Thani, Samut Prakarn, Kalasin, Khon Kaen, Ubon Ratchathani, Nakhon Ratchasima, Chiang Mai and Phuket. Interested persons may contact tel 02-245-4035 or hotline 1506 ext 4.”

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30381006

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-01-24
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My Thai friends are saying the economic pinch is under reported.  They say Youtube is where there is truthful reporting among the usual crackpots, making it easily labeled as "fake news" by the current government.  Some are trying to find work overseas.  Some do not know what to do.   

 

The above is a nice idea, given the low investment of time, but what about finding a location to sell?  Will they be welcomed?  Will those who are already doing this be happy with more competition?  If they choose to stay mobile, there are cheap wireless technologies that can let customers know where they are, but those are not legal in Thailand.

 

Along Asoke, some vendors run out of supplies just after 3pm.  How do they restock remotely? 

 

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a bit iffy on a motorcycle, but i suppose no more than 4 people on one.

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20 hours ago, Oziex1 said:

A nation of Waitresses and Waiters.

That speak little English so the major businesses have to bring in English speaking staff from other countries!

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More grossly sugary drinks to contribute to the obesity and diabetes issues in this country.

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39 minutes ago, thequietman said:

A side car on a motorbike here is illegal if added yourself.

 

So, they are encouraging people to break the law! Brilliant. 🙂

 

Thailand, the land of broken laws.

I'm sure Nestle will not be encouraging a DIY approach to constructing these mobile shops!

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proly involved kickbacks, or Nestle sells raw materials for these products.

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15 minutes ago, Moonlover said:

I'm sure Nestle will not be encouraging a DIY approach to constructing these mobile shops!

According to Thai law, any illegal modification is not permitted. That includes the very nice side carts that Nestle have currently provided for selling their ice cream.

 

They are breaking the law, but in this country, that don't mean sheee ite. Money talks and ............ well, u know how it goes. 🙂

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15 minutes ago, thequietman said:

According to Thai law, any illegal modification is not permitted

Yes can't add one on after.  but I think if the bike and side car are registered together since new then it is legal.

TigerRetroSCSm.jpg.3ed3e9f6f2af0493b147ef508664ec33.jpg

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10 hours ago, yellowboat said:

My Thai friends are saying the economic pinch is under reported.  They say Youtube is where there is truthful reporting among the usual crackpots, making it easily labeled as "fake news" by the current government.  Some are trying to find work overseas.  Some do not know what to do.   

 

The above is a nice idea, given the low investment of time, but what about finding a location to sell?  Will they be welcomed?  Will those who are already doing this be happy with more competition?  If they choose to stay mobile, there are cheap wireless technologies that can let customers know where they are, but those are not legal in Thailand.

 

Along Asoke, some vendors run out of supplies just after 3pm.  How do they restock remotely? 

 

Not to mention the costs of the Franchise,s they will all probably get locked in to

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19 hours ago, thequietman said:

A side car on a motorbike here is illegal if added yourself.

 

So, they are encouraging people to break the law! Brilliant. 🙂

 

Thailand, the land of broken laws.

 

18 hours ago, johng said:

Yes can't add one on after.  but I think if the bike and side car are registered together since new then it is legal.

TigerRetroSCSm.jpg.3ed3e9f6f2af0493b147ef508664ec33.jpg

According to the Land Traffic Act, Section 4:

 

'Motorcycle means a vehicle that is driven by engine power or electric or other power and has not more than two wheels and, if attached by a sidecar has not more than an additional wheel'. (I'm quoting verbatim so the poor English is theirs, not mine)

 

So a motorcycle, with sidecar is recognized as a legitimate vehicle.

 

I have read elsewhere that one is not allowed to modify a vehicle. So I suspect that @johng is right. If presented for registration as a combi, (as I used to know them) they're legit'.

 

 

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