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Govt wants switch to gasohol E20 by mid-year

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Govt wants switch to gasohol E20 by mid-year

By The Nation

 

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Sonthirat Sonthijirawong, Minister of Energy

 

The Energy Ministry is pushing to have all vehicle operators who use benzene to switch from gasohol 91 to gasohol E20 by mid-year. Minister Sonthirat Sonthijirawong said on Friday (January 24) the price of palm oil had stabilised somewhat after the ministry promoted the use of gasohol B10 as the preferred diesel fuel.

 

 

“The next measure is to promote gasohol E20, which is 20 per cent ethanol, as the most commonly used benzene fuel in the country,” he said.

 

“The aim is to increase the price of energy crops such as cassava and sugarcane, which are the raw materials for making ethanol. We also want to reduce the number of benzene fuels sold at petrol stations by removing gasohol 91 altogether.”

 

Cassava used to produce ethanol accounts for 27 per cent of total production, Sonthirat noted.

 

“If we can promote the use of cassava to produce ethanol, it will increase the value of agricultural products and improve the farmers’ quality of life.”

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30381030

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-01-25

 

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11 minutes ago, Crossy said:

Problem is, many small engines can't handle E20 and so users will be forced to use the more expensive 95 octane E10 or will simply use E20 and wreck their fuel systems.

 

Of course, none of this type of information will be made available to the general public.

Thanks, I was thinking the same thing. My Honda CBR250R runs fine on 91 but no idea if it would like E20.

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5 minutes ago, edwinchester said:

Thanks, I was thinking the same thing. My Honda CBR250R runs fine on 91 but no idea if it would like E20.

 

It should tell you in the owner's manual, it will certainly depend upon the exact model 

http://www.hondampe.com.au/docs/owning_a_honda/owners_manuals/motorcycles/CBR250R-RA 32KYJE000.pdf

says max 10%.

 

I was actually thinking of the millions of Honda GX35 and similar engines powering brush-cutters, water pumps, generators and all manner of small portable kit. These are rated for 10% ethanol max. Luckily the seals that get killed are cheap and readily available for these little chaps.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

It should tell you in the owner's manual, it will certainly depend upon the exact model 

http://www.hondampe.com.au/docs/owning_a_honda/owners_manuals/motorcycles/CBR250R-RA 32KYJE000.pdf

says max 10%.

 

I was actually thinking of the millions of Honda GX35 and similar engines powering brush-cutters, water pumps, generators and all manner of small portable kit. These are rated for 10% ethanol max. Luckily the seals that get killed are cheap and readily available for these little chaps.

 

 

buy up the seals, someone will make a motza on them now

 

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Another sop to the biofuel industry. No-one in government seems to understand by the time externalities are added in, such as fertiliser runoff, monoculture and government subsidies, the true cost of ethanol is some 50 - 70% above that of a petroleum-based fuel.

Half a tank of 95 straight petroleum, half a tank of E20.

 

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2 hours ago, edwinchester said:

Thanks, I was thinking the same thing. My Honda CBR250R runs fine on 91 but no idea if it would like E20.

Honda have been at the for front of this push globally, I switched to E85....85% Ethanol not 20% over 6  years ago when I brought a Honda Accord. Of course it will take any other petrol--as when it first came out there were not that many stations selling it--now its very  common. I get from the Lao Boarder (Nong Khai) to Bangkok on 1 tank (with the price increase now about 1,200 baht) This isn't an exaggeration--& I am prone to driving fast.

Honda used to have 50%  electric models but seemed to have stepped back from this with the success of their ethanol cars.

 

Last month I was in Oz with a rent a bomb (2004 car) it didn't handle the E20 they have there at all, had to go back to full price  petrol (which is quite a price there) I was told by the rental company as a rule of thumb any car over 2007 should handle E20 ok.

 

Most of this years Honda motor bikes are now E85

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How do theses quacks get into high positions to bark when they should be quacking!

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2 hours ago, sanuk711 said:

I switched to E85....85% Ethanol not 20% over 6  years ago when I brought a Honda Accord.

Nowadays most new limousines seem to be "flexifuel" capable.

If government ends subsidy for E85, the price might jump.

Ethanol is still more expensive than petrol off refinery.

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They only want to appear stupid....They know exactly what will happen to untold billions of dollars worth of engines if the engines are forced to run on 20% ethanol.......

 

Replace seals?......Are you guys joking?...... The Thais already have a real problem with maintenance as it is.....

Edited by fforest1
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7 hours ago, Crossy said:

Problem is, many small engines can't handle E20 and so users will be forced to use the more expensive 95 octane E10 or will simply use E20 and wreck their fuel systems.

 

Of course, none of this type of information will be made available to the general public.

Lucky for folks like me who have cars such as the Suzuki Swift, as they recommend E20 gasohol, but not so lucky for other car users or as you say for those very small engines used on other equipment.

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7 hours ago, Crossy said:

Problem is, many small engines can't handle E20 and so users will be forced to use the more expensive 95 octane E10

Well, the difference is 0.27 Baht today (25.98 vs. 26.25).

A bit more than 1% and less than the monthly/weekly fluctuations.

40 Satang reduction as of today as an example:

https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1145051-e20-compatibility/?do=findComment&comment=14989622

 

Not such a big issue?

Stepson always insisted on 95 for his four stroke Honda brush cutter whilst I still had 91 in the canister (now stopped and only 95 for all small engines, scooter etc.).

 

Now writing in two parallel threads regarding E20, confused :wacko:

Edited by KhunBENQ

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