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Top 10 building mistakes in Thailand and SE asia. 2019


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Wish i could rate this topic minus whatever.

 

So stupid to make it an "only in Thailand" ( yeah right asia) issue again like those things not happen all over the world!

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This is useful list if you are building new or buying used. I've noticed after years in Asia.   1. Roofing. - No roof. Flat roofs are not water proof. Need black tar or rubber membrane

Farangs can't comment on electrics, because Thai electricity is different. 

Only 10, with a bit more thought this could be doubled, and with some critical in-depth thinking doubled again. 

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If you are building new, bring construction crew from your home country, and supervise all the time

If you are buying pre-owned, -inspect,inspect,inspect- and buy only during rainy season. Never buy Thai or Expat renovated property!

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On 1/25/2020 at 3:28 PM, Don Chance said:

This is useful list if you are building new or buying used. I've noticed after years in Asia.

 

1. Roofing.

- No roof. Flat roofs are not water proof. Need black tar or rubber membrane or water will leak through columns into top floor.

- Roof too small. Like a yamaka, water runs over building or onto roof. Roof should extend over building and balconies.

- Roof should be vented on the sides and or ridge vents.

- Concrete panel roofing. Beware of asbestos. Common in Thailand.

 

2. Exterior.

- Exterior walls should be water proofed with rubberized paint or even tar.. Water resistant paint will not be good enough. Ideally foam board insulation glued onto the walls will keep the building cool. Stucco or spray foam onto exterior walls also will work.

- Strange ledges extending from the floor to the exterior. Bad design will allow water to enter structure and under neath flooring. Can be cut off completely removed. Or water proofed with rubber or tar. This is just lazy ways of building so they can work more easily on the exterior.

- Balconies. Tiles are not water proof will leak eventually and enter the floor. Needs underlay, water proof slab or Schluter-DITRA Tile Underlayment.

 

 

3. Foundations. Avoid slab foundation. Rather pier style raised or crawl space.  Slab foundation need to be have rubber water shield under neath before pouring concrete. Barrier should extend up the side of the building.  Thailand is prone to monsoon floods. Other wise you have a wet, damp slab. Moisture will rise up into the house and cause problems.

 

4. Septic.  Never put a septic under the build it self should be set away from the house. Avoid buying a unit with the septic underneath, it will smell and mold will rise up into the house.

Septic tanks should be away from the structure a 2-3 meters, needs 3" vents intake and out take (google septic venting diagram)

Sewage connected to municipality should have back flow protection to prevent snakes and odors from entering the building.

 

5. Plumbing

Asian plumbing does not include stack vent. This will make the drains function much better and also displace sewer gas. Otherwise sewer gas will rise up to various parts of the building, infect structure will mold. (google stack venting plumbing for diagram.)

 

6. Floor tiling.

Most building have mold under the tiles in Asia ( more western people suffer from mold allergies than Asians.) This is because the slab is wet and is unable to dry out, so mold grows. There needs to a air gap, a dimpled plastic sheet such as DMX air gap. There are also chemical sealants that can be applied to the sub floor.

 

Another issue i see in new builds is the adhesive or mortar used for the tiles is wet. The tile go over it and the glue can not dry because no air can reach. The adhesive or mortar needs to be put down then left to dry awhile so it is sticky. There are new building that still smell of adhesive years after completion. Creates unhealthy VOC's.

 

Use Schluter-DITRA Tile Underlayment or other in the shower and bathroom, this is never done in Thailand and will fail in a few years with heavy water use. Bathroom becomes full of mold.

(google tile floor underlay installation for diagram.)

 

7.  Kitchen and bathroom vents. A lot of kitchens in Thailand don't have vents. This is good idea to control fires and humidity.

 

8. Interior. If you have concrete walls, ideally finish with dry wall and 1/2" gap will allow interior, unfinished concrete walls to dry out. Do not put wall paper on the interior or there will be mold growth in no time.

Ceiling should have dropped space so unfinished concrete can dry out and allow for venting of humidity from the floor.

 

9. Wood on concrete. Another common mistake wood on concrete should always have a plastic barrier you will see this with wood windows on the concrete form. Sometime wood  piers sit in concrete for fences, decks or foundation, they should have tar painted to protect. The concrete will corrode the wood with water and cause it rot quickly.

 

10. Grading and run off. Beware of monsoon may flood the building. I've seen this many times during the monsoon, building are constructed too low.

 

 

 

Most common problem with Thai construction is roof leakage . Reason is it is very rare to see a secondary roof design . Roof tiles can not be relied on in heavy rain and wind . Yet I do understand this would raise the price of the house , but not more than 5 percent .

 

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On 1/25/2020 at 3:28 PM, Don Chance said:

This is useful list if you are building new or buying used. I've noticed after years in Asia.

 

1. Roofing.

- No roof. Flat roofs are not water proof. Need black tar or rubber membrane or water will leak through columns into top floor.

- Roof too small. Like a yamaka, water runs over building or onto roof. Roof should extend over building and balconies.

- Roof should be vented on the sides and or ridge vents.

- Concrete panel roofing. Beware of asbestos. Common in Thailand.

 

2. Exterior.

- Exterior walls should be water proofed with rubberized paint or even tar.. Water resistant paint will not be good enough. Ideally foam board insulation glued onto the walls will keep the building cool. Stucco or spray foam onto exterior walls also will work.

- Strange ledges extending from the floor to the exterior. Bad design will allow water to enter structure and under neath flooring. Can be cut off completely removed. Or water proofed with rubber or tar. This is just lazy ways of building so they can work more easily on the exterior.

- Balconies. Tiles are not water proof will leak eventually and enter the floor. Needs underlay, water proof slab or Schluter-DITRA Tile Underlayment.

 

 

3. Foundations. Avoid slab foundation. Rather pier style raised or crawl space.  Slab foundation need to be have rubber water shield under neath before pouring concrete. Barrier should extend up the side of the building.  Thailand is prone to monsoon floods. Other wise you have a wet, damp slab. Moisture will rise up into the house and cause problems.

 

4. Septic.  Never put a septic under the build it self should be set away from the house. Avoid buying a unit with the septic underneath, it will smell and mold will rise up into the house.

Septic tanks should be away from the structure a 2-3 meters, needs 3" vents intake and out take (google septic venting diagram)

Sewage connected to municipality should have back flow protection to prevent snakes and odors from entering the building.

 

5. Plumbing

Asian plumbing does not include stack vent. This will make the drains function much better and also displace sewer gas. Otherwise sewer gas will rise up to various parts of the building, infect structure will mold. (google stack venting plumbing for diagram.)

 

6. Floor tiling.

Most building have mold under the tiles in Asia ( more western people suffer from mold allergies than Asians.) This is because the slab is wet and is unable to dry out, so mold grows. There needs to a air gap, a dimpled plastic sheet such as DMX air gap. There are also chemical sealants that can be applied to the sub floor.

 

Another issue i see in new builds is the adhesive or mortar used for the tiles is wet. The tile go over it and the glue can not dry because no air can reach. The adhesive or mortar needs to be put down then left to dry awhile so it is sticky. There are new building that still smell of adhesive years after completion. Creates unhealthy VOC's.

 

Use Schluter-DITRA Tile Underlayment or other in the shower and bathroom, this is never done in Thailand and will fail in a few years with heavy water use. Bathroom becomes full of mold.

(google tile floor underlay installation for diagram.)

 

7.  Kitchen and bathroom vents. A lot of kitchens in Thailand don't have vents. This is good idea to control fires and humidity.

 

8. Interior. If you have concrete walls, ideally finish with dry wall and 1/2" gap will allow interior, unfinished concrete walls to dry out. Do not put wall paper on the interior or there will be mold growth in no time.

Ceiling should have dropped space so unfinished concrete can dry out and allow for venting of humidity from the floor.

 

9. Wood on concrete. Another common mistake wood on concrete should always have a plastic barrier you will see this with wood windows on the concrete form. Sometime wood  piers sit in concrete for fences, decks or foundation, they should have tar painted to protect. The concrete will corrode the wood with water and cause it rot quickly.

 

10. Grading and run off. Beware of monsoon may flood the building. I've seen this many times during the monsoon, building are constructed too low.

 

 

 

 

So just about everything from the foundation up....

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On 1/26/2020 at 12:08 PM, LNKDES1 said:

And nothing mentioned about electrical.

Right, Like burying unglued electrical conduits and plumbing in concrete floors and walls. An ongoing nightmare. Glue is often not used in joints or properly cured, insane. 

If I ever built a house here all those things would run on exterior and interior walls and to hell with the appearance. 

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On 1/27/2020 at 12:58 AM, Foexie said:

Wish i could rate this topic minus whatever.

 

So stupid to make it an "only in Thailand" ( yeah right asia) issue again like those things not happen all over the world!

You are just so, so wrong. I'll leave it at. 

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On 1/26/2020 at 1:51 PM, transam said:

I do miss those 6x2 loft rafters where you can actually shimmy along to sort wiring out....😏

Yep and I miss Joist Hangers  where can I buy them Without paying ridiculous shipping? 

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