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Rice farmers switching to zucchini

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Rice farmers switching to zucchini

By The Nation

 

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Farmers in Yang Talad district of Kalasin province are switching to growing zucchini instead of rice during the dry season.

 

Even though Thai agriculture has been associated with rice for centuries, the severe drought has forced farmers to grow other crops to pull through the crisis.

 

Zucchini presents an alternative for farmers. It is a drought-tolerant plant and their seeds can be exported to other countries at Bt800 per kilogram.

 

A zucchini tree normally produces two squashes with each bearing 200 - 300 seeds.

 

120 kilogrammes of zucchini seeds can sold for Bt96,000-Bt100,000, compared to Bt3,200 - Bt6,000 for 400 kilograms of rice.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30381139

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-01-27
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8 minutes ago, snoop1130 said:

A zucchini tree

More sterling reporting from the Nation, it also produces many squashes,

but they must be only growing 2 on to be large and to produce as many

seeds as possible,so now expect a glut of Zucchini seeds on the market,

and for the price to drop,when all the farmers start growing them.

regards worgeordie

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9 minutes ago, rickb said:

Why only consider selling the seeds?  Why not sell the whole zucchini for people to eat?  I love to eat zucchini and haven't had any since I moved to Thailand many years ago.  The prices quoted above for selling seeds sound good.  But, how many zucchini plants are needed to produce a kilogram of seeds?  I'm guessing a very high number!  Seems to me they are missing the obvious.

 

They do. It's done on FB by Thais. My wife is seriously involved.😎 It is not done on this forum.😏

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1 hour ago, khwaibah said:

They do. It's done on FB by Thais. My wife is seriously involved.😎 It is not done on this forum.😏

So can you enlighten us on how many seeds are needed to produce a kilo?

 

Any idea what the seeds are then used for?

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Would be great if the sugar cane burning industry polluters would follow suit. 

Edited by mickey rat
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Grow crotalaria seeds. Plant in November-early December and harvest the seed in March-April. Dry season crop. Big export market now but the seeds need to be clean to 99.5% purity with no weed seeds, no rice seeds and no other crop seeds. The harvesting is fairly easy but the cleaning is difficult. 

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5 hours ago, nahkit said:

So can you enlighten us on how many seeds are needed to produce a kilo?

 

Any idea what the seeds are then used for?

Kwaibah, I was hoping you'd actually ask your wife and give us an answer???

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8 hours ago, Assurancetourix said:

I have lived in isaan for 14 years, I have always seen farmers growing zucchini;
another HiSo from the Thai public service who has just invented the line for cutting soft butter ...:cheesy:

 

 

courgettes in France  ; In the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, Malaysia, and Singapore, a fully-grown, matured courgette is referred to as a marrow

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zucchini

 

I love what to do when you are in a drought period, which is currently the case in Isaan ...

 

"Hoe and weed at the beginning of vegetation and mulch. In the evening, make frequent waterings, especially in times of drought."

 

How are we going to get  the water?
can be in dehydrated sachets ..:crazy:

You open the bag and to get what you need, you add water in sufficient quantity.

 

Here I am going to give the idea to the genial general who governs Thailand with a hand of velvet in a brass glove

 

 

Have to disagree with Wikipedia on this. In the UK a zucchini is a particular variety of courgette which is yellow and thought of as a particular Italian variety of courgette. A courgette is a courgette. Generally speaking, courgette in Europe, zucchini in the US.

 

 

Edited by DannyCarlton

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I have tried to grow Zucchini in Isaan. Nearly impossible, without pesticides. My plants are always attacked by orange coloured beetles, they chew large holes in any young leaves, then lay their eggs inside the flowers and roots.  Usually at this stage the plant dies! If it survives a little longer, you MAY get fruit, but 90% of mine had grubs inside and went rotten. So far i have had fruit to eat once, fruit which all went bad twice, and nothing twice.

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The figures i got

Roughly

1800 seeds/kilo

plant 730 seeds/rai

730 x 250 x 2 = 365,000 seeds/rai

365,000 / 1800 = 200kg/seed/rai

200 x export price 800 = 160,000/rai

minus expenses,sounds like some good money to be made so should see a lot of zucchini fields next year.🤨

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14 hours ago, farmerjo said:

minus expenses,sounds like some good money to be made so should see a lot of zucchini fields next year.

if this happens, i'm not madam irma but i see a drastic fall in market prices and farmers who will cry again if the government does not help them.

Let them study the market and cultivate what they want without advertising it around them in order to remain the only ones on the product; prices will remain stable and not collapse.

 

Long ago, when I was a handsome and strong young man :giggle:, I went to Jersey to harvest potatoes;
local farmers looked daily at the local market for the purchase price at the wholesale market;
when the price dropped they asked us to stop picking; we were either not paid or paid to do something else;
and when the price went up we went back to the fields to harvest a few tonnes of potatoes ...

 

I remember that was a hard work , especially because of my tall height: 193 cm

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