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Clinic/lab that can check for rT3?

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Does anyone know if there is a clinic or lab in Thailand that can check for rT3?  Bangkok R.I.A. does not have it listed on their sheet in the clinic. I'm trying to save money so I'd rather find a cheap clinic where I can do the test rather than an expensive private hospital.

 

Thanks for any assistance.

 

 

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I very much doubt it, the only place that would have occasion to do this would be labs in teaching hospitals and they'd be doing it for research purposes, given that there is currently no clinical application for the results. There isn't even a clear standard for interpreting results.

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24 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

I very much doubt it, the only place that would have occasion to do this would be labs in teaching hospitals and they'd be doing it for research purposes, given that there is currently no clinical application for the results. There isn't even a clear standard for interpreting results.

 

Thanks Sheryl.

 

That is truthfully shocking to me given the huge amount of research that has been devoted to the subject of T3 to rT3 ratio, its role in insulin resistance, as well as how it affects patients struggling with hypothyroidism that don't respond to traditional treatment. The absolute rT3 by itself may not have a clear clinical interpretation, but the ratio certainly does.

 

Is there some test that can calculate the ratio that doesn't involve calculating the factors individually?  Alternatively, do you have any idea of a contact at a university hospital that I could ask to do this for me? 

 

 

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I strongly suggest you stop trying to self prescribe tests and instead consult a top endocrinologist for proper management, They will order such tests as they think will be helpful to your management and that is very, very unlikely to include an rT3.

 

While rT3 is subject of quite a bit of research neithger it nor the T3 to rT3 ratio currently has any proven clinical significance.

 

Beware of quack sites online of which there are many.

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Thanks Sheryl.

 

Top endocrinologists are unfortunately outside of my budget at the moment, but I will definitely research the issue further and try to understand more of the factors involved. I generally try and restrict myself to published articles in medical journals in forming opinions, but I think there is a lot more quality information out there than you may be aware of.

 

 

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