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Thai army to transfer control of land after mass shooting

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Thai army to transfer control of land after mass shooting

 

2020-02-17T123225Z_1_LYNXMPEG1G0RE_RTROPTP_4_THAILAND-MILITARY.JPG

FILE PHOTO: Family members and Police officers ride with coffins containing bodies of SWAT members Trakool Tha-arsa and Petcharat Kamjadpai, who were killed in a mass shooting at the Terminal 21 shopping mall, at a military airport in Bangkok, Thailand, February 10, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

 

BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thailand's army agreed on Monday to transfer management control of 160,000 hectares of commercial land to the finance ministry in a drive to reform its business practices after a soldier went on a shooting spree over a property deal gone sour.

 

Sergeant Major Jakrapanth Thomma killed 29 people and wounded 57 during a 19-hour rampage last week after he shot his commanding officer and relative in a business dispute. The 32-year-old soldier was then shot dead.

 

The incident cast a spotlight on the questionable involvement of soldiers in the army's commercial activities, in a country that has just emerged from direct military rule.

 

Army Chief General Apirat Kongsompong has vowed a major cleanup of the army's business activities, which generate an annual income of nearly one billion baht (£24.64 million or $32 million). They include golf courses, boxing arenas, horse racecourses, sports clubs, hotels and petrol stations.

 

"From now on the army will hand over various projects to the Treasury Department to consider how to proceed, based on its laws and regulations," said General Teerawat Boonyawat, Chief of Staff of the army.

 

The transfer means the businesses' revenues will go directly to the state. Some of the earnings will go towards the welfare of army personnel.

 

"I cannot yet say how much profit the army businesses generate because we have to work on it," said Prasong Poontaneat, Permanent Secretary of the Finance Ministry.

 

"We will bring on board professionals to make these businesses beneficial to soldiers' welfare and improve transparency," he said.

 

(Reporting by Panarat Thepgumpanat and Panu Wongcha-um; Editing by Gareth Jones)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-02-18

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In other words, business as usual, only in other hands from inactive posts to inactive posts

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

We will bring on board professionals

General professionals

  • Haha 2

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And whoever they transfer them to, will do the same thing 😂

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

involvement of soldiers in the army's commercial activities

commercial activities... Army...

Well, I think that there's not much more to say here.

It's just sick. And they talk about it with a straight face.

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19 minutes ago, ParkerN said:

Bottom line: try to love the way Thailand is 'cos it isn't going to change. Too many people got too much to lose if it does. Corruption is a way of life in Thailand, and the Army and police are right up there in the vanguard. Nothing's going to change but there's a few charades they can be counted on to act out while trying to convey the entirely false impression that things can change. And who's in charge overall? Not a big secret.

Thats just the way it is, from a western perspective it's plain wrong, but that's the way its always been here, next time they are called upon for yet another coup, sure they will be rewarded with further riches for keeping the "Elites" in power!

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2 hours ago, colinneil said:

Commercial activities?

I always thought that the army was there to protect the country, clearly i was wrong.

Now we know why this country has so many generals, they are needed to oversee all the businesses.

There should be no commercial activities going on at all.

Maybe beer and cigs in the mess hall

 

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I read a study some years ago, that indicated that the army was the largest land owner in the nation, at just over 12 million rai. Business? Yes, I would say so. Quite a lucrative organization. 

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Crooks in green.

Crooks in brown.

Crooks in yellow.

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5 minutes ago, spidermike007 said:

that indicated that the army was the largest land owner in the nation

Not quite, and certainly not in Bangkok where it matters

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3 hours ago, Emdog said:

Wow.... hard to wrap head around this....

"We will bring on board professionals to make these businesses beneficial to soldiers' welfare and improve transparency,"

Uh, no suggestion that property and businesses ought to be beneficial to the Thai people? Never crossed minds?

"....annual income of nearly one billion baht (£24.64 million or $32 million). They include golf courses, boxing arenas, horse racecourses, sports clubs, hotels and petrol stations."

 Vital to defense of country, maybe even more than submarines

Cui Bono. Follow the money. Definitely perceived as being vital to the defence of the country...

 

Whether or not that is true is a moot point. Power can be defined as the number of people who will do what you tell them to do. So, cui bono?

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