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Drought crisis: Levels in the Maekhong River continue to plummet

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Drought crisis: Levels in the Maekhong River continue to plummet

 

8pm.jpg

Picture: 77kaoded

 

Thai media reported that water levels in the Maekhong River bordering Thailand and neighboring countries continue to plummet amid a drought crisis in Thailand.

 

77kaoded published pictures of sandbanks appearing in the river in the Nong Khai area.

 

They said a level of 73 centimeters had been recorded though the bank was more than 11 meters high.

 

IMG_2028-3.jpg

Picture: 77kaoded

 

It is expected to drop by a further 8 - 10 centimeters by tomorrow.

 

Boats were having difficulty traversing the river as the levels all the way from Chiang Rai in north Thailand to Ubon Ratchathani in the north east keep falling.

 

Source: 77kaoded

 

 

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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2020-02-18
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Yeah, this river is in dire need of another dam. Maybe two.

Edited by shadowofacloud
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1 hour ago, sammieuk1 said:

Any remainig tourists still thinking of coming here will be told to bring 20 litres of water instead of 20 kilos of clothes next🤔

20 litres for playing Songkan.

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Why does this keep coming up?  The Irrigation department said yesterday that they have the drought situation completely under control.  So these dropping water levels are not a problem.

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2 hours ago, chilli42 said:

Why does this keep coming up?  The Irrigation department said yesterday that they have the drought situation completely under control.  So these dropping water levels are not a problem.

Jan. 24, 2020 - China has agreed to increase the rate of water release from Lan Chang River from 850 cubic metres per second to 1000 cubic metres per second in order to meet the urgent needs of Thailand and other countries in the Mekong River Basin.  

https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30381002

  • Since 2019, rainfall in the Lan Chang-Mekong River basin has continuously decreased as a result of climate change, causing severe drought situations in China and many others along the Mekong River basin.
  • At Lan Chang River in China, the average precipitation is 728 millimetres, 34 per cent lesser than usual. Until January 21, 2020, agricultural areas in 1.07 million villages (450,000 rai) were affected by the drought because of the shortage of water in 15 rivers and 43 dams in Yunnan province of China.  

China can't provide what it doesn't have - water for Thailand.

Maybe ID needs to update its facts.

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8 hours ago, Srikcir said:

Jan. 24, 2020 - China has agreed to increase the rate of water release from Lan Chang River from 850 cubic metres per second to 1000 cubic metres per second in order to meet the urgent needs of Thailand and other countries in the Mekong River Basin.  

https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30381002

  • Since 2019, rainfall in the Lan Chang-Mekong River basin has continuously decreased as a result of climate change, causing severe drought situations in China and many others along the Mekong River basin.
  • At Lan Chang River in China, the average precipitation is 728 millimetres, 34 per cent lesser than usual. Until January 21, 2020, agricultural areas in 1.07 million villages (450,000 rai) were affected by the drought because of the shortage of water in 15 rivers and 43 dams in Yunnan province of China.  

China can't provide what it doesn't have - water for Thailand.

Maybe ID needs to update its facts.

“With the completion of more mainstream dams and the cumulative effects of climate change, that tipping point” for when the Mekong can no longer sustain these changes “may be coming closer,” says Brian Eyler, the Southeast Asia program director at the Stimson Center in Washington, D.C.......... > it's both... if you have control of a dam further upstream, and you need the water more than others downstream, what would you do with your dam gates ??????? ah.. how does this fit with your "facts" ???

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