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UK seeks to attract high-skilled workers with points-based immigration system

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UK seeks to attract high-skilled workers with points-based immigration system

By Kylie MacLellan

 

2020-02-18T224531Z_1_LYNXMPEG1H1L1_RTROPTP_4_BRITAIN-EU-IMMIGRATION.JPG

FILE PHOTO: Signage is seen at the UK border control point at the arrivals area of Heathrow Airport, London, September 3, 2018. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo

 

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain will prioritise access for high-skilled workers from around the world in its post-Brexit, points-based immigration system, the government said on Tuesday, setting out its plans to put an end to a reliance on "cheap labour from Europe".

 

Concern over the impact of high levels of immigration from the European Union was one of the key drivers behind Britain's 2016 vote to leave the bloc and the government has said it plans to bring overall migration numbers down.

 

The new system will assign points for specific skills, qualifications, salaries or professions and only give visas to those who have enough points. It will come into force from Jan. 1, 2021 and will treat EU and non-EU citizens the same.

 

"For the first time in decades, the UK will have full control over who comes to this country and how our immigration system operates," the government said in a policy document setting out its plans.

 

EU citizens will not need a visa to enter Britain as a visitor for up to six months.

 

The Home Office said it would follow a recommendation made last month by the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), an independent body which advises the government, to lower the minimum general salary threshold for skilled migrants to 25,600 pounds ($33,330) a year, from 30,000 pounds.

 

Skilled workers will need to meet criteria including specific skills and the ability to speak English, the government said, and those applying will need to have a job offer.

 

There will be no specific entry route for low-skilled workers, something the government hopes will help reduce the number of migrants.

 

"We need to shift the focus of our economy away from reliance on cheap labour from Europe and instead concentrate on investment in technology and automation. Employers will need to adjust," the policy document said.

 

The MAC estimated the impact of the government's planned salary and skills thresholds would mean around 70% of European Economic Area citizens who have arrived in Britain since 2004 would not have been eligible for a visa.

 

Students will be covered by the points-based system, the government said, while there will be separate initiatives for scientists, graduates, National Health Service workers and those in the agricultural sector.

 

(Editing by Stephen Addison)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-02-19
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1 hour ago, Chomper Higgot said:

"We need to shift the focus of our economy away from reliance on cheap labour from Europe and instead concentrate on investment in technology and automation. Employers will need to adjust," the policy document said.

Interesting quote. History has shown that slave labour stifles technological innovation, the Romans Empire being a good example.

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53 minutes ago, nausea said:

Interesting quote. History has shown that slave labour stifles technological innovation, the Romans Empire being a good example.

‘Slave labour’.

 

Please do keep to reality.

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28 minutes ago, evadgib said:

Spud picking was a 'nice little earner' during school holidays when I was a kid, as were strawberrys & apples etc in season. All the youth of today need to do is to put their screens down and get on their bikes.

image.jpeg.1bdcd2599a41730db2b611da3506379e.jpeg

 

& in the winter months there's always a few quid to be made clearing Rabbits, Pigeons, Squirrels.

image.jpeg.1042186619027792c1b35daabda34ddb.jpeg

And when the school holidays end and the children have to go back to their books?

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A look at which sectors of the economy are short of worker’s is enough to reveal this ‘bureaucracy creating idea’ will fail:

 

Construction facing worker shortages since 2014, hotels catering, health and welfare, and others all short of workers.

 

Oh and Wetherspoon facing a profit warning ( sad that).

 

https://www.ft.com/content/36baacce-ddd0-11e8-9f04-38d397e6661c

 

 

Edited by Chomper Higgot
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18 minutes ago, Laughing Gravy said:

Yes stop cheap labour, exploiting workers. Seems only fair. No doubt the Brit Bashers and Non Brits will be furious that the UK is putting the benefit of the UK first.

 

Any wonder we left the EU when we couldn't do that simple task.

 

Who in their right mind would allow themselves not to be able to feed their own country people and allow other countries to fish in their waters more than their own. Admittingly agents of the EU such as Heath, Major and Blair.

 

Again soon to be stopped and any wonder why we left the EU

It appears you missed the bit about lowering the minimum qualifying wage from £30,000 to £25,600.

 

 

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