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"Forward thinking" Thai school bans homework - director believes Finland model is better

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6 hours ago, webfact said:

The director said that he had studied education models in Finland

Why go to Finland to find what already exists in Japan or Korea which are two Asian countries.
It seems to me that it would be easier to transcribe in Thailand what is practiced in highly educated countries like the two countries mentioned above.
I am not sure that asking Thai children and parents to put themselves in the Korean school system,  they'll like it very much ..:cheesy:

 

Japan and Korea are known for their very strict discipline. Something completely unknown in Thailand.

I very often pass by primary and secondary schools in Thailand when I cycle on my MTBike ;
whatever the hour it's a big mess :crazy:

Edited by Assurancetourix

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1 hour ago, car720 said:

So what is new?  They don't understand anything.

except how to use their stupidphone (thank you bluesofa for the word :jap:) to go watching dirty videos on X's sites;
that, they know how to do ....

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23 minutes ago, Krataiboy said:

Schools here are little more than indoctrination centres which teach conformity to Establishment norms while crushing creativity and ignoring children's innate curiosity.

I went to a grammar school in the uk in the 80's and to be honest most of the teachers didn't like you to question things. 90% of the teachers couldn't be @rsed to teach as they had been there too long. Copying passages out of their text books onto the board and if you could'nt copy quick enough you had no chance. I may of not been the best pupil but I do feel if they had put more passion and life into it I would have been more interested. It was all about conformity and obeying the rules and I hated every second of it. 

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So what do they do in Finland after school in the winter when it’s below 20 degrees ? Play Xbox.

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7 hours ago, webfact said:

The director told Channel 7 that he had received so many complaints from the students themselves that homework was ruining their lives, making them stressed and causing them not to want to go to school. They didn't even understand their homework.

This has to be a wind-up by a Channel 7 news writer. I watched the whole interview this particular sentence was not mentioned by either the director or the student interviewees. In the interview, the director sounded quite decent in terms of his visions (I'm not a big fan of Thai teachers btw). The kids looked particularly excited because they think they would have more time for extra curricular activities such as music, sports, etc. or have time to make academic improvements on what they have actually learned in the class.

 

 

Edited by macleans
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All the other models are better, so good for Thailand to start looking at how other countries do stuff.

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To be honest, Thai kids just copy off of the one kid that actually does it anyways. It's basically pointless. 

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4 hours ago, csmith said:

The focus of most comments in this thread seem to be focused on teaching with little mention of learning.

 

Learning is a collaborative process not just the responsibility of one person or dependent on one strategy … it required a blended approach.

 

Learning is no longer something that just happens in early years but needs to be a lifelong activity .… 'lifelong learning' 


The Strategy in the article may well work … it depends on what the traditional homework is replaced with … if it encourages the child to be more responsible for their own learning, to become independent learners, to be able to collaborate more easily, to be better researchers, to be able to quantify their own personal learning networks (PLN) .… then that would be brilliant.


… and while we are here .… try a Google search for 'The Flipped Classroom' … of even check it on Youtube 🙂

 

 

 

 

Flipped learning and all that jazz is great if you have a system that can set that up .. manage it and direct the children accordingly .... Do you see that happening ?  I assume you are in education in Thailand .. Does that fit a progressive and innovative model that you see?  Maybe .. just maybe he is doing this to be 'popular' with the paying parents who are giving him a hard time as the kids does not understand the homework they are given ?

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1 hour ago, Monkeyrobot said:

So what do they do in Finland after school in the winter when it’s below 20 degrees ? Play Xbox.

Try skiing ..  or sitting in a Sauna for 1/2 hours then roll aground  naked in the snow ...  🙂

 

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8 hours ago, whiteman said:

So no homework they just get more Dumber than they currently are, Kids of today ok mum home early no homework on to the computer games

Born Not Knowing anything , and learn nothing at school. that's the way to go Backwards thailand knows best.  😩😴

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Yes, Finland does that well. Take a guess why... to teach there requires a Master's in education. Finland has consistently been investing in high quality education and the difference from my days (70's & 80's) is staggering. That part of my taxes back then went into right place.

 

No hope whatsoever to translate that model into Thailand. It requires an uncorrupt platform.

Edited by DrTuner
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9 hours ago, BobbyL said:

I can't disagree with that. Research has shown there are very little benefits to regular homework in terms of academic attainment. Extra - curricular activities such as sports, music, art and design etc can offer far more social and intellectual development.

 

The school that I taught at in England gave no formal homework apart from a small humanities based project each term (3 a year). Students were also required to read regularly and fill in a reading record.

 

The international school where I work in Bangkok require the students to have maths, spellings, English and reading homework each week. This all obviously has to be marked by myself too 🙄. In particular, the Thai parents in my class request more work for their children to do at home and regularly email me for stuff. Jeez, just let the kids have a life outside of school!  

 

i do agree but that was within an educational environment of a national curriculum, professionally trained teachers and inspection of schools, with failing school/teacher performance addressed.

 

on a different topic, speaking to several children of friends it seems to be quite common for the end of year exams, set by thai and foreign teachers, to contain questions unrelated to any work covered in the previous school year, which seems a strange way to assess student learning...

 

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