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Teachers of Thailand: How much paid holiday do you get a year?

How much (paid) holiday do you get?  

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Just out of interest cos I think it varies a lot - but we'll see!

 

This doesn't include national public holidays, just the end of term break, the end of year break, and any other holiday/leave allowances.

 

 

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I am a now retired foreign teacher. I taught at four different high school in three different provinces, Two were public, two were private. I cast my vote on a composite average basis, though actually, there was not much difference between the four places. At one place, our annual holiday leave was about two weeks longer than the other three, but that was offset by a longer workday. The MOE and OBEC specify a required number of instructional hours/year. Too my knowledge, it is the same for all schools, at least within the two broad categories of Prathom and Mathayom.

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I never realised until reading more stuff on here how many people teaching don't get paid for holidays. Fair play to anyone doing that and being able to live happily. 

 

My experience is slightly different as I have no knowledge of Thai schools, but in my international school we get 14 - 15 weeks off a year fully paid. We only get two public holidays off and are open as usual for most of them. Songkran always falls in Easter so we are off then anyway. We're allowed 3 personal leave days at full pay. 

 

For the 19/20 academic year our holidays are - 

 

October - 1 week

Christmas - 3 weeks

February - 1 week

Easter - 2 weeks

Summer - 7 weeks and two days (optional paid extra summer school for 2 weeks at the end of June / early July) 

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Including the Songkran (summer) break, the Midterm (October) break and a week and half at New Year.  That is 6 & 1/2 weeks of paid vacation per year. 

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7.5 weeks summer.

2+ weeks term break

1 week seasonal

1 week other

All Thai holidays

 

* Minimum two weeks of the summer period work at home for next term. I don't need all that time. Better to be prepared. Five weeks being lazy. Two week trip and recharge.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Number 6

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On 2/24/2020 at 2:28 PM, Isaanbiker said:

Not one baht from the middle of March to the beginning of June, sometimes not even paid for a few days off in November/ midterm.

 

  I do not have sick leave, no business days, and no insurance!

 

Luckily, I could continue paying into my Thai social security privately, so I'm fully covered. 

 

But none of my colleagues has got that./ 

 

 It wasn't always like that, but a wrong decision on my side only left the choice to work for an agency. 

 

 Then, I couldn't leave because I had to be there a full year to get my teacher's license. 
  
It might soon be over, but that's how it is, perhaps was. I'm looking forward to greener pastures. 

 

For people who're planning to start teaching, please do not sign such a contract. 

 

I do regret it, but shi_t happens from time to time, and I'm now paying the price of leaving my school, where I had a lovely position. 

 

It's now time to move on. There's nobody else to blame than me for signing such a contract. 

 

It can be quite tricky when you have to feed a family. 

 

If it is any consolation, your contract is not legally binding in the eyes of Thai labour law. You can walk at anytime with no repercussions. It the contract does not fall in line with the labour law, which it won't, then it is a void contract. Purely done for show and to try to control you. Hope this helps. 🙂

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When I started 12 years back, I accepted unpaid holiday for both the holidays, but that was OK. Life was fun back then!

 

As time progressed and the jobs got better, I got half pay and the monthly salary increased, then full pay every month for the whole year, we needed to do some lesson prep or some extra classes, but still received 6 weeks to 2 months off over the 2 holidays at full pay.

 

This progressed into getting up and making a 40 minute trek on a bike to scan your finger before 8.00 am. Summer camps were added to the list, along with spending time sitting in staff rooms twiddling thumbs or producing a text book for a social studies course that was never implemented after hours of meetings, from there it started going downhill. At that time I was practically working the whole year for 32K a month but this time we had no unpaid holiday and it wasn’t fun any more .. That was the time to quit.

 

Schools seem to lose track of the idea, we are here to enjoy Thailand, if you are working an 8 hour day, 48 weeks a year then you may as well go back home, and earn better money. 

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Let me do some quick math.  I think my last contract worked out to be about five weeks of vacation for nine months.  There are many days that simply turn into some "activity" or exams or something else that cancels classes.  Plus another week of giving exams, so that's really like six weeks off for nine months.  But, yes, summer camp, and a zillion little extra projects that amount to about an extra 30 hours.  Zero stress stuff, but it's still work.  

 

A good school will offer a 12-month contract.  My first one was maybe 18-months, but that doesn't come without its headaches.  

 

In hindsight, I think a 6-month contract makes sense.  If you don't like the school, leave.  easy.  Suffering for another six months isn't good.  

 

The KEY is to come to Thailand with lots of money and only teach for fun money.  Keep your burn rate down.  If you are a poor teacher, you must leave immediately and go make real money.  

 

 

Edited by Ventenio
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Go teach in Vietnam. They appreciate real English speakers ( West Coast America ) 45 bucks an hour US freaking D. Goes to show you what's up and who cares.

 

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I used to teach in Bangkok at one of the big public universities about 30 years ago.  Although I liked the teaching and the time off the money was quite poor.  Although looking at what some teachers make now, we actually did much better when adjusted for inflation.  Contracts were all for a year and you were paid for all the breaks throughout the year.  After a few years I left teaching and got a real job that was not in education and paid much more.    

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My new contract says one week off in October plus the public holidays.

 

It's not wonderful but beats teaching in dull as hell China. There I had masses of time, but there was hardly anything to do.

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allot of foreign teachers in Thailand work through an agency... its very rare for a school to hire a teacher directly unless its a University or an international school.

 

Most agencies will only pay for the time worked during the school year + plus normal scheduled holiday days (which there are quite a few)... during the school break teachers will usually have to fend for themselves by doing private lessons or camps. (be warned most agencies are shady they will try to overwork you without extra compensation... and will not pay on time... read your contract very carefully before signing or agreeing to anything)  In some cases an agency wont even do a proper interview before offering you a contract... which means they are desperate and cant keep the position filled..  take the position at your own risk if you come across an agency that is to eager too hire you.

 

its worth noting that some agencies will hire you if you don't have BA... but you will need to have a BA if you want to get a work permit.

Edited by speckio
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