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Standards for electric cars coming

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Standards for electric cars coming

By The Nation

 

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The Thai Industrial Standards Institute (TISI) will announce standards for electric cars by March. TISI secretary-general Wanchai Phanomchai said a committee has approved the draft standards for electric cars/vehicles for transportation and cargo, which the institute proposed.

 

“Car manufacturers are beginning to produce electric cars powered by batteries instead of an internal combustion engine because the government has promoted the production and use of electric vehicles in the country,” he said.

 

“The government has set up development guidelines to change the automotive industry into an electric vehicle industry, as well as promote alternative energy to reduce oil consumption and the environmental impact. We expect that these standards will be announced by March this year,” Wanchai said.

 

He explained that the electric car standards refer to UN regulation No 100 Revision 2 Uniform Provision concerning the approval of vehicles with regard to specific requirements for the electric power train from Amendment 1 to Amendment 4, which are European Union electric vehicle specifications that cover the safety of batteries when they are installed in a car.

 

“Once the battery is installed, it must be safe to use and can be recharged repeatedly. Also, the battery must withstand any impact from an accident and should not cause a short circuit during use,” Wanchai said.

 

He said the TISI plans to set up modern automotive standards to comply with the government policy.

 

“By this year, we will issue 20 standards and then an additional 20 in 2021. In this regard, Industry Minister Suriya Juangroongruangkit has urged the TISI to accelerate the process because it is an important government policy,” Wanchai added.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30382745

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-02-24
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I'm a bit confused about this.

To start with Wanchai says there are already EU specifications covering battery safety. Are the TSI are going to issue their own standards?

Will the TSI mirror the EU standards, or will there be new standards not yet implemented?

 

Do the EU (and UN) have common standards already for, say, connectors, cable size, power requirements, etc., to charge vehicles, so there would be no need to change these if you change your vehicle?

A bit like the standards for mobile phone chargers - even though in the past year or so the connector has been superseded, so there's now not one common standard.

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31 minutes ago, bluesofa said:

I'm a bit confused about this.

To start with Wanchai says there are already EU specifications covering battery safety. Are the TSI are going to issue their own standards?

Will the TSI mirror the EU standards, or will there be new standards not yet implemented?

 

It all depends on what it takes to milk some graft and corruption for the lawmakers, or to give the Elite some way to lock everyone else out of making any real money.  I'm sure one of the requirements will be a special license to import, which can only be obtained if you're well connected.

 

They can't just adapt the EU standards, since they're not set up for the same purpose.

 

Edited by impulse
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7 minutes ago, rvaviator said:

Standards for EV are well understood and accepted by the countries who make EV ...  UN Reg 100 rev2 started live way back in the days of door step milk deliveries back in UK ...

 

Sounds like Thailand is going to 'adopt them'.  No point reinventing the wheel .. its common practice.

 

Yes you do have various standards for connectors and chargers etc ...  But you do have some difference .. Charger standards in Japan is not the same as in US etc ... So you do a bit of 'mixed salad' on that side .. 😉  ..

Can I ask why the US and Japan have different standards?

Even allowing for different input voltage and frequency, that can obviously be handled by the unit that supplies the 'standard' to the car via the charging cable.

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14 minutes ago, rvaviator said:

Standards for EV are well understood and accepted by the countries who make EV ...  UN Reg 100 rev2 started live way back in the days of door step milk deliveries back in UK ...

 

Sounds like Thailand is going to 'adopt them'.  No point reinventing the wheel .. its common practice.

 

Yes you do have various standards for connectors and chargers etc ...  But you do have some difference .. Charger standards in Japan is not the same as in US etc ... So you do a bit of 'mixed salad' on that side .. 😉  ..

I agree 

I am sure they will study pre existing standards and adopt them with minor  modifications to reflect Thai specific concerns. 

I hope vested  economic interests in the existing internal combustion vehicle industry in Thailand don't influence the process. 

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3 hours ago, bluesofa said:

Can I ask why the US and Japan have different standards?

Even allowing for different input voltage and frequency, that can obviously be handled by the unit that supplies the 'standard' to the car via the charging cable.

Depending on the EV model in question it may support one or more different ways of charging the battery pack  – It can have a onboard battery charger which will take AC input from a ‘special wall socket’ convert it to DC and charge up the battery , or it can take DC input from a large stationary charger which is hard wired to the AC grid and it will deliver DC directly to the battery on the vehicle.

AC charging – The charger is fitted in the car (about the size of a shoe box), It will typical charge a vehicle up in 6 to 8 hours

DC charging – The charger is huge in comparison (size of a petrol pump 🙂 ) – This is what is used for ‘fast charging’ .. When people talk about charging up the battery from 20% to 80% in 30min etc … (100% is fully charged)

To allow safe operation of both types of chargers – The vehicle has a onboard computer which manages the charging process – it communicates with the ‘special wall socket’ for the AC charger.

In the case of the DC charger, same thing applies. The vehicle computer has to talk to the DC charger. (The photo above show a typical DC fast charger)

In both cases you have a cable .. from the vehicle .. to the DC charger or the ‘special wall socket’ for the AC charging process. This cable carry both the power (AC or DC) and the communication link.

The various standards around – are related to the communication protocol and what the connector lock like – Some EV’s can be charger both by its onboard charger (AC, 6 to 8 hours) and ‘fast’ with DC. Hence you need a connector that can handle both inputs.  

The picture below show the various standards in use today.

 

image.png.b10a156f68264919621d200622f1b9c0.png

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8 hours ago, rvaviator said:

{snipped}

The picture below show the various standards in use today.

 

image.png.b10a156f68264919621d200622f1b9c0.png

Thanks for that, very interesting.

I've searched for different types of charging connectors. These are the ones I've found so far:

 

There is CCS - Combined Charging System, used in the EU since 2014.

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combined_Charging_System

 

Another one is Chademo, which was proposed in 2010 as a global industry standard.

Incredibly, the name comes from a Japanese pun:

"CHAdeMO is an abbreviation of "CHArge de MOve", equivalent to "move using charge" or "move by charge" or "charge 'n' go", a reference to the fact that it's a fast charger. The name is derived from the Japanese phrase O cha demo ikaga desuka, translating to English as "How about a cup of tea?", referring to the time it would take to charge a car."

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHAdeMO#cite_note-general_pr-5

 

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“Once the battery is installed, it must be safe to use and can be recharged repeatedly. Also, the battery must withstand any impact from an accident and should not cause a short circuit during use,” Wanchai said. "

 

Samsung cars

 

 

Edited by spiekerjozef

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Seen some of these accidents with the vehicle literally ripped apart.

Passenger area designed to be the protection area for the people inside.

So now a battery protection area as well. 

Don't see that working at all.

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15 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

Standards for electric cars coming

and the very first standard for the car is: it is not exempt from brake failure

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Can you please ensure all electric vehicles have a speed regulated audible warning and not be like China with the "whispering death". It is frightening to deal with these silent killers on the road. 

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