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Toyota Corrola Altis 2006 engine: gasohol 91 or E20 or E85?

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I own a Toyota Corrola Altis from 2006. It's a pretty old car, but it runs like a charm.

I have always filled up the tank with the regular gasohol 91 as this is what is mentioned as the correct fuel.

My question is, can I use E20 or E85 instead? People are giving me random answers, so I want to know if you guys know if the engine is "compatible" with either E20 or E85.

Thanks for any answers!

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Your car is not flex fuel, I believe the max for it is E10, which is your basic 91..

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Many E85 vehicles have a higher cost per KM than gasahol cars as it takes more fuel to make the same HP, negating any cost savings.

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Gasohol 91 will be out-phased soon.

I would change to Gasohol 95 and neither try E20 not to speak of E85.

And this is NOT about possible damage but motor control will not handle E85 correct (needs longer injection time?). I have an E20 compatible car and would have to buy some control box to use E85. Fortunately I passed on the idea.

 

I stumble upon an article saying that cars from 2008 on were fit for E20.

2006 is too early I guess.

Change to Gasohol 95.

 

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Keep using 91 or 95 .

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Why not ask Toyota? Thats what I do when the instructions in the vehicle are vague.

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On 2/26/2020 at 3:20 PM, KhunBENQ said:

Gasohol 91 will be out-phased soon.

I would change to Gasohol 95 and neither try E20 not to speak of E85.

And this is NOT about possible damage but motor control will not handle E85 correct (needs longer injection time?). I have an E20 compatible car and would have to buy some control box to use E85. Fortunately I passed on the idea.

 

I stumble upon an article saying that cars from 2008 on were fit for E20.

2006 is too early I guess.

Change to Gasohol 95.

 

Hi Khun BENQ, sorry to intrude but where can I get information on B10 and B20 and Premium diesel which I was confronted with yesterday? I was allowed out for the first time in a long while and simply went to a PTT to fill up my 2014 Fortuner with 'diesel'. They asked "B10, B20 or Premium?" The price seemed to have a 5 ThB spread per litre. The 'light of my life" phoned the local  Toyota dealer and was told 'premium', the most expensive, but I would like to understand the reasoning. Thanks.

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2 hours ago, AjarnMartin said:

Hi Khun BENQ, sorry to intrude but where can I get information on B10 and B20 and Premium diesel which I was confronted with yesterday? I was allowed out for the first time in a long while and simply went to a PTT to fill up my 2014 Fortuner with 'diesel'. They asked "B10, B20 or Premium?" The price seemed to have a 5 ThB spread per litre. The 'light of my life" phoned the local  Toyota dealer and was told 'premium', the most expensive, but I would like to understand the reasoning. Thanks.

Read it all...https://www.toyota.co.th/en/news/gOe91vOP

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If 91 disappears then I’d upgrade to 95. We have a Toyota Vios (2009) which runs well on E20 but it’s a bit later than yours. Our other car is a Honda H-RV which runs on anything from 91 to E85. I always use 91 in it and again if 91 disappears I’ll switch up to 95.

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27 minutes ago, Jaxxper said:

If 91 disappears then I’d upgrade to 95. We have a Toyota Vios (2009) which runs well on E20 but it’s a bit later than yours. Our other car is a Honda H-RV which runs on anything from 91 to E85. I always use 91 in it and again if 91 disappears I’ll switch up to 95.

Mix E85 and 95, brings the cost down a bit and it will perform..

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Biodiesel has a cleaning action so if the vehicle has a lot of mileage the biodiesel may flush out all the gunge accumulated from before.

 

If so, then maybe a couple of tankfuls treated with fuel system cleaner before switching. to gradually clean out the system.

 

"Bio" is similar to ethanol in gasoline insomuch as it will reduce fuel economy.  

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