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BananaBandit

until when was Isaan part of Laos?

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I've asked several people face-to-face and received conflicting answers.

 

I've looked online, and the info seems a bit complex. 

 

My current "understanding" is that:

 

Isaan was part of the Lao kingdoms of Vientiane and Champasak for several centuries. 

 

When the Siamese defeated Vientiane kingdom in 1827, Isaan became a political no-man's land as far as who "owned" it. 

 

At some point around 1900, Isaan became formally recognized as part of Siam/Thailand. 

 

...Do I have things remotely correct here ??

 

Was there a particular year when Isaan officially became part of Siam/Thailand ?

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If you ask my wife, she'll tell you that Nong Khai still is. Refers to herself as Lao Issan not Thai Issan.

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21 minutes ago, KhunBENQ said:

Too fast!

I am not through with reading and history is far from my strong points.

Found "late 18th century", "1779" when Isan was separated from Lao Kingdom of Lan Xang.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lan_Xang

I better stop here :tongue:

Yep, Nong Khai fell to the Siamese in 1779. The last time it had independance from what we now know as Thailand. Had been part of the Lan Xang empire for 400 years before that.

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As you said yourself it is complicated. Before Siam was unified it was made up of various kingdoms. My copy of a map for 1540 shows the kingdom of Lan Na and the kingdom of Ayudhya which is basically modern day Thailand minus the north east. The north east border of Ayudhya ran from Nakon Nayok to Phitsanulok. The land to the east is made up of a Laotian kingdom called Lan Sang which ran to the border with Vietnam. Funnily the border bypassed Nakon Ratchasima which stayed in Ayudhya kingdom

A map of 1400 shows the kingdom of Sukhothai all the way past Vientiane.

Edited by Toosetinmyways
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So do we call people with Thai-Laos hertitage farang..,Technically Yes is my guess...

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17 hours ago, puchooay said:

Without wishing to start an avalanche of comments about the word "Farang" and it's uses. the answer to your question is NO. "Farang" refers to White European, although nowdays just generally white foreigner.

A small avalanche... as I was led to believe, ‘falang’ actually comes from the history of French Indo China when the French (falang set?) colonised the region of SE Asia?. Since then, all white visitors are so named? Maybe this is too simplistic but it sounds reasonable? Of course, Thailand doesn’t recognise ANY colonisation, for whatever reason (Japanese in WWII?).

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