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Azithromycin, Chloroquine & Hydroxychloroquine

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I've stocked up on zinc, multivitamins and paracetamol, taking the two former as I write, the latter if fever develops.

IMO taking any other medication without medical oversight would be playing Russian Roulette.

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On 3/24/2020 at 6:14 PM, Aforek said:

I took nivaquine ( chloroquine ) twelve years when I lived in Africa, no problems but it was for ...malaria; here , we speak of covid 19

Usually it's taken once a week for malaria prophylaxis, whereas in covid-19 the dose is twice a day so the toxicity is very high. 

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On 3/21/2020 at 12:25 PM, gargamon said:

Stop listening to Trump. Azithromycin is an antibiotic. Covid-19 is a virus. The other two are unproven as of yet with only anecdotal evidence. Wait for real testing. If you like, stockpile some but don't take any. The other drug refimivir (something like that) that they hoped worked has failed tests.

 

Best bet, get a pneumonia vaccination. its pneumonia that kills them so that's what you really need to stop.

You need to do some research. Azithromycin is a n antibiotic yes but it is there if one gets pneumonia from the virus weakening the body.  This combo has been used with claims of success in other countries as well as by the French doctor.  Trump has nothing to do with the development of this treatment which could potentially save lives or would you rather they die to make a political statement?

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https://pagesix.com/2020/03/22/daniel-dae-kim-anti-malarial-drug-secret-weapon-in-my-coronavirus-recovery/

 

This guy was prescribed Tamiflu, Azithromycin and Hrdrochloroquine....by his doctor.....not Trump.

He also had to use some sort of nasal decongestant spray.

I wouldn't recommend you blindly follow his lead.

But if you have no choice....I know what I would do.

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so lets say it is a month from now and the whole medical system has crashed in Thailand.

 

try as you might, you still get very sick with the Chinaflu :clap2:and you finally see a doctor and he says sorry your lungs have not crashed yet but your really sick and we are out of one thing that might possible help you that is short supply right now. Chloroquine.

 

you can go on google right now and read about it:

 

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/coronavirus/new-york-starts-new-experimental-drug-therapies-to-treat-covid-19-heres-what-we-know/2341931/

 

https://www.thecardiologyadvisor.com/home/topics/practice-management/fda-studies-underway-to-evaluate-chloroquine-for-covid-19/

 

https://www.kgw.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/oregon-veterans-home-doctor-using-combination-of-drugs-to-treat-covid-19/283-6a054e1b-b56c-4650-b318-a1d05c716cc5

 

And lets say you had a full unused dose sitting around your house from your cancelled trip to Myanmar last year.

 

Do you A.) Die.

or         B.) Start chompin' down those pills?       

 

 

 

 

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The government in France has accepted the use of chloroquine yesterday, in hospitals

I think because situation is urgent

there are now experiences in different european countries with several medecines, results in two weeks 

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It is clear for most specialists in the world that Nivaquine Chloroquine and Plaqueril Hydroxychloroquine work, but do they give them in Thailand ?

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1- hydroxychloroquine 200mg twice a day for 5 days

2- azithromycin 500mg once a day for five days

3- zinc sulfate 220mg once a day for five days

 

Dr Zelenko statistics - 699 cases / 0 deaths = 0% death rate

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8 hours ago, gamesgplayemail said:

It is clear for most specialists in the world that Nivaquine Chloroquine and Plaqueril Hydroxychloroquine work, but do they give them in Thailand ?

 

it is not at all clear that this is the case, in fact most doctors using this report seeing no obvious result. Which does not rule out a small benefit, needs a large scale controlled study to know that, but does strongly suggest it is nto the miracle cure some portray it as.

 

And yes they give chloroquine in Thailand. they give it in many hospitals around the world, it just doesn't have any obvious result  that can be readily seen. Which as mentioned does nto rule out a small difference, you need large numbers compare to controls and statistical analysis to determine that,

 

Give it a rest and wait for the result of proper studies which will not take much longer as they are already well underway.

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On 4/8/2020 at 11:09 AM, Sheryl said:

 

it is not at all clear that this is the case, in fact most doctors using this report seeing no obvious result. Which does not rule out a small benefit, needs a large scale controlled study to know that, but does strongly suggest it is nto the miracle cure some portray it as.

 

And yes they give chloroquine in Thailand. they give it in many hospitals around the world, it just doesn't have any obvious result  that can be readily seen. Which as mentioned does nto rule out a small difference, you need large numbers compare to controls and statistical analysis to determine that,

 

Give it a rest and wait for the result of proper studies which will not take much longer as they are already well underway.

 

You speak like idiots from my government. Idiots that nobody trust when chloriquine is openly used throughout the world.

Politics are idiots, we must be smarter than them.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
On 4/8/2020 at 11:09 AM, Sheryl said:

 

it is not at all clear that this is the case, in fact most doctors using this report seeing no obvious result. Which does not rule out a small benefit, needs a large scale controlled study to know that, but does strongly suggest it is nto the miracle cure some portray it as.

 

And yes they give chloroquine in Thailand. they give it in many hospitals around the world, it just doesn't have any obvious result  that can be readily seen. Which as mentioned does nto rule out a small difference, you need large numbers compare to controls and statistical analysis to determine that,

 

Give it a rest and wait for the result of proper studies which will not take much longer as they are already well underway.

Knowledgeable scientists and doctors that are advocating its' use are not thinking of hydroxychloroquine and zinc as any sort of "cure" for COVID-19, much less a "miracle cure".

 

Rather, they are looking at its' use as a way to delay onset and severity of critical symptoms for those who may respond favorably.  Considering that a deliverable vaccine is over a year away, any drug that might have the efficacy and safety to achieve this seems to be worth seriously looking into.

 

Even if it is anecdotal and not subject to the rigors of strict clinical trials yet, there seems to be quite a few positive outcomes being reported around the world, in connection to prescribing HCQ and zinc, especially in South Korea and China.

 

Furthermore,  there are a lot of in-vitro studies that demonstrate the mechanisms by which HCQ and zinc can prevent viruses from entering the cell membrane, or if already inside, can alter its' ability to replicate.  So, there is actually a pretty strong scientific basis for at least not just writing it off.

 

Chloroquine has been around for decades with an excellent safety record, and hydroxychloroquine is supposedly even safer.  If properly prescribed by a licensed physician who is knowledgeable about the drug, and his/her patient's particular situation, why should it not be a viable option?

 

Even if there was only a small chance of efficacy; if it could mean avoiding a trip to ICU, or even just shortening the time there, wouldn't that be reason enough to try it?

 

Edited by WaveHunter
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16 hours ago, WaveHunter said:

 

Even if there was only a small chance of efficacy; if it could mean avoiding a trip to ICU, or even just shortening the time there, wouldn't that be reason enough to try it?

 

 

It would probably NOT mean that if efficacy was limited, in fact it might mean the opposite. More people might end up in critical condition or dead due to the side effects than would benefit.

 

This is the sort of information that clinical trials are designed to obtain.

 

There isn't a short cut and aggressive promotion of this drug without this information is counterproductive at best.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Sheryl said:

 

It would probably NOT mean that if efficacy was limited, in fact it might mean the opposite. More people might end up in critical condition or dead due to the side effects than would benefit.

 

This is the sort of information that clinical trials are designed to obtain.

 

There isn't a short cut and aggressive promotion of this drug without this information is counterproductive at best.

Well, you're entitled to your opinion and I'm entitled to mine. 

 

There are very smart, knowledgeable, and credible experts on both sides of the fence when it comes to this topic.  Some advocate compassionate use in spite of lack of clinical trials; some are against that. 

 

If chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine were some sort of new experimental drug with no safety track record, there would be no debate that clinical trials should be mandatory, but these drugs have been safely used for decades and their mechanisms are well understood.

 

In an ideal world, stringent clinical trials would obviously be the way to go, but this current situation is far from ideal!  By-the-book clinical trials lasting months or even years are NOT going to help someone entering ICU right now with perhaps days to live. 

 

That's what the "compassionate care" provision is all about, and I believe in it 100%.  That's why the FDA has granted Emergency Use Authorization, and I think that's also a good thing.  They did so because the science behind the use of HCQ and Zinc for Covid-19 treatment is very compelling.  So are the smaller clinical trials to date.  Though they might not meet the rigors of stringent clinical trials, they are very compelling and come from credible sources.

 

I can see valid points on both sides, but if were infected and was facing the real possibility of critical complications and possibly death, I would want that choice to decide for myself, and know that my doctor felt no constraints to provide me with transparent advice.

 

I know someone personally who's been on ventilation with severe pneumonia and came very close to dying.  It's not a pretty thing and I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy.

 

An individual facing such a dire situation should be allowed the choice whether or not to consider HCQ for themselves in consultation with their own doctor and nobody else should have a say in that...no one!.

Edited by WaveHunter
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