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Should I increase my pool chlorine level during the covid outbreak?

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Question as per the topic title.

 

We have the grandkids staying for the duration and they use the pool a lot.

 

Should I increase the chlorine level (turn up the salt water chlorinator) or leave it at the levels we usually use?

 

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As long as you have free available chlorine present, it will kill viruses.

The real problem will be maintaining social distancing of grandkids, that will be like herding cats.

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5 hours ago, Don Mega said:

https://www.ihrsa.org/improve-your-club/pool-hot-tub-sauna-safety-during-covid-19/

 

A well-run, clean swimming pool with appropriately treated water using chlorine at internationally accepted levels should provide adequate disinfection to neutralise the COVID-19 virus.

Operators in most countries should ensure chlorine levels in pools and spas are kept between 1-3mg/l with the pH between 6.8-7.4. Spa pools that use bromine need to maintain their water at 4-6mg/l bromine or 3-5mg/l chlorine. Routine tests for microbiological quality should also be undertaken in line with national guidelines.

Given that the virus is a new one, experts cannot say with absolute certainty that it will be safe. However, most authorities believe that pool and spa waters that are adequately disinfected should not spread the disease. A bigger risk will be the face-to-face interaction between individual users of the pools and spas.

So, you get your critical health safety information from an association of health club owners?  Really?

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5 hours ago, Don Mega said:

https://www.ihrsa.org/improve-your-club/pool-hot-tub-sauna-safety-during-covid-19/

 

A well-run, clean swimming pool with appropriately treated water using chlorine at internationally accepted levels should provide adequate disinfection to neutralise the COVID-19 virus.

Operators in most countries should ensure chlorine levels in pools and spas are kept between 1-3mg/l with the pH between 6.8-7.4. Spa pools that use bromine need to maintain their water at 4-6mg/l bromine or 3-5mg/l chlorine. Routine tests for microbiological quality should also be undertaken in line with national guidelines.

Given that the virus is a new one, experts cannot say with absolute certainty that it will be safe. However, most authorities believe that pool and spa waters that are adequately disinfected should not spread the disease. A bigger risk will be the face-to-face interaction between individual users of the pools and spas.

No-one adds bromine for disinfection directly. It is added as sodium bromide, which then forms hypobromite when chlorine is added. The main advantage of a bromine-based system is it is more effective at higher pH.

It is important to distinguish between total chlorine and free available chlorine. Total chlorine is the amount of chlorine required to react with various organics in the water to be treated, to form compounds such as chloramines. These compounds may or may not be effective in disinfection, whereas free available chlorine virtually guarantees it.

If coronavirus is resistant to the nascent oxygen produced by free available chlorine, it would be a first.

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26 minutes ago, Don Mega said:

Normally I take whats posted on forums by morons as gospel... sometimes I venture out and use google instead.

 

What in my post did you feel was misleading  ?

The source.  Show me a quote from doctors specializing in infectious diseases saying that you won't get corona from swimming in a pool and I might take it seriously.  I still wouldn't swim in the pool, however,

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12 hours ago, amykat said:

Well I saw doctors interviewed on CNN who were asked this question, they said the virus won’t travel through water so swimming was okay, but above the water, talking and touching people would be the risk.  So if these are people at your own house, who are sharing a close space already, I don’t know why the pool would be extra risk???

Public pools are extra risk, due to the number of people in the pool. Viruses CAN travel through water IF the level of chlorination is inadequate.

Organic materials such as sweat, skin cells and urine deplete free available chlorine. Private pools are usually smaller in volume than a public pool, so it's a balancing act.

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had seen an official medical document about that and standard chloring level in pools will not transmit corona.  found it as i wanted to swim in condo pool that is empty 98% of time.  chloring has no effect on respiratory aerosolized transmission of those in pool.

 

here it is. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/php/water.html

 

limit corona to the corona only in your fridge.  (illustrative pic attached)

corona beer.jpg

Edited by atyclb

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No, but you could reduce the amount of foie gras your serve them before they go swimming.

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A flame and a reply have been removed

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As I have said before on this thread, chlorine works because the nascent oxygen it releases oxidizes any organic material it encounters.

Chlorine has disinfected water systems containing bacteria for many decades. Public swimming pools would be a huge health risk if it were otherwise.

The average bacterium is about 1000 - 2000 nanometers in size. Even giant viruses are less than that. COVID-19 is 120 nanometers in size.

Stop worrying.

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unless your family group is isolating as a small herd, and has been for some weeks now without symptoms then communal swimming is ill advised (govt and health group warning all over the globe).

sharing pools with anyone other than immediate cohabiting family that have been in isolation for some weeks at least is also highly risky let alone having them enter your home.

if the kids are coming and going from your home and not being strictly isolated from others then assume they and you  have the virus and practice protocols.

 

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@Tropposurfer excellent advice.

 

As noted in my OP, we are indeed isolating as a small herd, only I leave our 1.5 Rai compound (I still have to work, essential staff) and I practice social distancing as required by the office anyway (masks, 2m spacing, sanitser everywhere). As the only driver I'm also lumbered with doing the shopping although Madam supervises via Line!

 

Whilst only our herd use the pool I was merely wondering if upping the chlorine (crank up the chlorinator) had any value.

 

With a pool, fast internet and food the kids are happy as pigs in ...

 

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