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Brazil confirms first indigenous coronavirus case in the Amazon

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Brazil confirms first indigenous coronavirus case in the Amazon

By Anthony Boadle

 

2020-04-01T210009Z_1_LYNXMPEG304Z0_RTROPTP_4_HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-BRAZIL-INDIGENOUS.JPG

FILE PHOTO: Yanomami Indians perform a dance at the community of Irotatheri, during a government trip for journalists, in the southern Amazonas state of Venezuela, just 19km (12 miles) from Brazil's border, September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

 

BRASILIA (Reuters) - An indigenous woman in a village deep in the Amazon rainforest has contracted the novel coronavirus, the first case reported among Brazil's more than 300 tribes, the Health Ministry's indigenous health service Sesai said on Wednesday.

 

The 20-year-old woman from the Kokama tribe tested positive for the virus in the district of Santo Antonio do Içá, near the border with Colombia some 880 km (550 miles) up the Amazon river from the state capital Manaus, Sesai said in a statement.

 

Four cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in the same district, including a Brazilian doctor who tested positive last week, raising fears that the epidemic could spread to remote and vulnerable indigenous communities with devastating effect.

 

Sesai said the woman was a medical worker who had been in contact with the doctor. She was the only person to test positive among 15 health workers and 12 patients tested after the doctor was found to have the virus, Sesai said.

 

Their names were not made public.

 

The doctor had returned from vacation in southern Brazil to work with the Tikunas, one of the largest tribe in the Amazon with more than 30,000 people who live in the upper Amazon near the borders with Colombia and Peru.

 

The woman has not shown symptoms of COVID-19, the sometimes fatal respiratory disease caused by the virus, and she has been isolated with her family, Sesai said.

 

Health experts warn that the spreading virus could be lethal for Brazil's 850,000 indigenous people, who have been decimated for centuries by diseases brought by Europeans, from smallpox and malaria to the flu.

 

Health experts say the indigenous peoples' way of life in communal hamlets under large thatched structures increases the risk of contagion if any single member contracts the virus.

 

(Reporting by Anthony Boadle; editing by Jonathan Oatis)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2020-04-02

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Terrible news.

 

 

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this could be worse than when the Spanish arrival decimated the Mayans 

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7 minutes ago, clarky cat said:

shows how far it can travel airborne 

 

4 hours ago, webfact said:

a Brazilian doctor who tested positive last week, raising fears that the epidemic could spread to remote and vulnerable indigenous communities with devastating effect.

 

Sesai said the woman was a medical worker who had been in contact with the doctor.

Yes; doctors do get around! 

  • Haha 1

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The good old way to get rid of indigenous people in Brazil. It 's been working for centuries.

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