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stament

Schooling what are schools and parents doing/planning?

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With the announcement that schools cannot open till 1st July at the earliest I'm interested to find out:

 

1/ what schools are planning to do, delay the term start or do online learning which seems to be the thing for private schools as they need revenue. If online schooling what discounts are being given to parents? I've seen 40% and 1 free term being offered by some schools.

 

2/ What are parents thoughts on online schooling? I myself aren't in favour of it for younger kids as I feel they need a teachers presence. Also there are bound to be teething issues with technology etc and motivating children might require parents to babysit their kids whilst learning. Certainly I can see that being needed for my 6 year old and it's not workable for our 3 year old in my opinion.

 

3/ Home schooling, thoughts on that? I believe this is a preferred option where possible for parents until normal schooling can resume.

 

 

I do wonder once Covit is over will the landscape for schooling see a dramatic change? Perhaps private classes from different teachers online instead of one school. I certainly see some change because if you are going to be taught online you would prefer to pick and choose the teachers.

 

Food for thought...

 

So far our school hasn't advised us parents of what's happening although they did have summer school online so maybe there's a clue there...... Unsure when we will find out, I have asked....

 

 

 

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I was a hired homeschooler for a variety of American children in udon between 1998-2005, grades K-6.  One student per year, 6 hours a day.  Some students were easy to work with, and some extremely difficult. Each student  was enrolled in the Calvert school program, about $1000 per year.  All the students eventually relocated to the US or other countries where they enrolled in other international schools or continued to be home schooled.  The Calvert program wasn't easy... For the students or for me.... But judging by how all the children did after they left the Calvert program, I'd say it was heads above what education they would have received in a Thai school.

 

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My child is attending an international school in Chiang Mai.  After much cajoling, they've decided to offer a reduction of about 3% - essentially the food costs.  The fee increases for next semester are still going ahead.  Pretty poor.

 

Online schooling so far seems to be setting a bunch of tasks and asking the child to submit.  No video conferencing or even streaming of lessons.  Attending school is very much about social development, so if that can't be provided, a private teacher is likely to be a better outcome.

 

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Posted (edited)

In my recent experience over the last few weeks of teaching online it requires all the students (thankfully I teach Y6) to be competent using the software needed and obviously have access to an iPad or laptop at home. All of our Primary students already use these throughout the week at school so that has helped. 

 

Using Google Suite works very well to set out the daily timetable and lesson objectives. We can record lesson videos for them and the students can then share their work with me and I can provide live feedback. They can also easily work collaboratively on projects together. We had live class meetings for the morning and afternoon registration and also provided the students with three 1 - 1 meetings each week. Having only 15 students made this quite easy to manage and we're continuing this from Monday 20th April. 

 

The big problems come with the younger students who cannot access tools like that. Our Early Years teachers were pre - recording hours of videos each day to send to parents which is madness. They were also printing hundreds of pages of work each week for parents to come and collect from the school office.

 

From what I heard from our Secondary teachers it is also difficult for them as they generally teach different subjects and multiple classes across year groups from Y7 - Y13. One of my friends teaches iGCSE history and geography to Y10 / Y11 and IB individual and societies to Y12 / Y13. That is a lot to manage throughout a week when teaching online. 

 

I am not sure how something like this could be easily implemented into your average Thai school though. I know a few TEFL teachers here so it will be interesting to hear what they are asked to do from May. 

Edited by BobbyL

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Just to add, my international school in Bangkok have offered parents a very small reduction for the term 3 fees. They will also be refunding all the money for transport, lunch, after school clubs etc.

 

Our principal also emailed out before the end of term last week saying they are predicting a slight drop in student numbers for term 3 (we currently have 17 new students meant to be joining Primary at the start of term 3). This drop is meant to come mainly from students in the Early Years because parents feedback was whilst they're at home it is too hard for them to organise and manage the school work. However, I doubt this will have an impact on the company that owns the school as they aren't exactly short for money.  

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10 minutes ago, eeworldwide said:

For what it's worth.

 

I've been schooling my 4 children in international schools for the last 6 years in Thailand.

As some of you may know, every school is different in how it is funded and run. 

Some are not for profit, and some are privately owned and don't care too much about losing money (to a degree - of course.)

Some are part of major educational entities back in the west or Australia ( like Nord Anglia for example)

The big impact on the schools will be when the middle vein of students (ie - those whose attendance at a school is subsidised by their parents company where they are employees) start to drop out because the companies can no longer afford to stay open due to the CVD19 scenario.

Some big companies are closing shop here already.

 

The longer this drags on, and the more expat families overseas are affected, the more likely expats are going to want to return home.

 

This can have a huge impact on international schools.

Ive decided to pull out of paying for international school fees in light of the current scenario - I'd rather pay $4000 to homeschool a year than $30,000 in attending international school, now that my industry has been badly impacted.

We are in unchartered territory, but I dont mind hoping that the school system in Thailand gets shaken up. There are really only a handful of honestly GOOD international schools here, and others are - as another TV member stated, simply cash cows, and the quality of teachers is really appalling.

 



 

There are some good teachers and not do good ones in most schools. 

 

What I don't like is teachers chosen for looks/age rather than quality and experience. This is very common in Thailand. 

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47 minutes ago, eeworldwide said:



Ive decided to pull out of paying for international school fees in light of the current scenario - I'd rather pay $4000 to homeschool a year than $30,000 in attending international school, now that my industry has been badly impacted.
 

 



 

Out of interest, is that just for the remainder of this academic school year or indefinitely? 

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50 minutes ago, BobbyL said:

Out of interest, is that just for the remainder of this academic school year or indefinitely? 

Well - this academic year is almost over - so I mean going forward. 
One has to see how things turn out globally economically towards Aug/Sep of this year.

I don't really WANT to homeschool, but hey - there are positives and negatives to every situation, we just have to make the best of it!

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16 hours ago, BobbyL said:

That definitely is not common in any 'real' international school that is fully western managed. If anything, being young and single is a major hindrance when applying. They want experience and what looks like reliability. 

 

Edit: The only thing I have found in my experience is a favour towards hiring females. For example, our Early Years department only hire women. 

Wouldn't get away with that in England, they would have you up on discrimination charges.

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6 minutes ago, stament said:

Wouldn't get away with that in England, they would have you up on discrimination charges.

Absolutely, although they don't openly publicise that in their advertisements on TES. 

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Our sons school demanded payment before the sh¡÷ hit the fan and have said nothing since regarding money, I'm not holding my breath either, we pay a basic fee for the term and ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING is extra throughout the term. 

 

The school has mentioned that next term will start in July and that year's 1(7) & 4(10) will have to do their introductory classes online. 

 

So, we've been had, nothing we can do now, just pray, wai & back off, hoping we don't get a steel toe boot up the ar3e

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My son goes to a private, bilingual school - 70% English and 30% Thai.  The school follows the Thai curriculum, and all subjects taught in English - 70% - have credentialed, native speaking teachers.  The school is not inexpensive - just slightly less than an international school.  I chose to send my son there rather than an international school because he is Thai and international schools do a very poor job of teaching Thai.  He needs to be able to read and write Thai fluently, skills that many Thais who attend international schools lack.  So far, we have heard nothing from the school regarding fees or online courses, which I am against by the way.  That said, I am not willing to pay even half the normal tuition if the school wants to do online instruction.  The school can simply adapt their schedule by eliminating the term break and finishing the year a few weeks later.

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