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rockyysdt

Sacrificing ones Practice resource to shield another from the fruits of their Kharma!

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Posted (edited)

Hi All.

 

It's been a little quiet in this corner so  thought I'd throw up a Kharmic concept for debate.

 

A fellow traveller, versed in the Buddhas teaching, had been developing his skills and experience towards the practice of Mindfulness & Meditation.

The goals were to better this life and aspire to travel on the path towards Awakening.

 

Circumstances found him befriending another plagued with misfortune and poverty.

The said friend, who also supports a small family, has limited prospects of earning a living wage.

Their disability, in a land too poor to cater for such issues, sees to that.

 

Partly due to "white knight" syndrome, the traveller began to support this friend, and over time, the beneficiary has become dependant.

 

The downside for the traveller is that his practice ended up taking a back seat.

Now, with age taking its toll, and working long hours, there is constant tiredness and little time for meditation. 

 

In Buddhist terms, one could say the traveller is suffering his friends Vipaka (the friends fruits of Kharma).

 

Is this admirable?

Is he accumulating brownie points for his next life?

How can the traveller walk away, while at the same time hold his head up?

 

And what of his impermanent and conditioned self (the only part which he is conscious of in this life)?

Does that impermanent and conditioned self miss out?

 

Looking for your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by rockyysdt

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Karma is neither good or bad it is simply the inevitable consequence of actions, words or thoughts (imo). They say you can't influence another's karma, so you could say that the 'white knight syndrome' attracted some of the friend's karma to your traveller. Life is short, and if you lose your way on the path (like I have) it might take lifetimes to get back there.

Eventually old age, sickness and death takes over the narrative........

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24 minutes ago, rockyysdt said:

In Buddhist terms, one could say the traveller is suffering his friends Vipaka (the friends fruits of Kharma).

 

Is this admirable?

Is he accumulating brownie points for his next life?

How can the traveller walk away, while at the same time hold his head up?

 

And what of his impermanent and conditioned self (the only part which he is conscious of in this life)?

Does that impermanent and conditioned self miss out?

I would compare this situation to raising children.

When i was raising my children, i was having not much time to think about spiritual matters, i was just focused on my main duty, raising the children.

 

Now, perhaps this is a case of "Karma debt", the "traveller" feels a "duty" to help his friend.

Perhaps the friend has helped the traveller in another life, who knows ?

If the "traveller" manages to help the friend to become free and independent, great, otherwise it's just ok that he tried to help.

It's difficult to answer your questions with certainty, the choice depends on individual feelings.

 

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What did you say?  Ask yourself...what would lord buddha do?

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1 hour ago, Puchaiyank said:

What did you say?  Ask yourself...what would lord buddha do?

If we knew that, we wouldn't be here!😉

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On 4/18/2020 at 2:27 PM, Bramley said:

Karma is neither good or bad it is simply the inevitable consequence of actions, words or thoughts (imo). They say you can't influence another's karma, so you could say that the 'white knight syndrome' attracted some of the friend's karma to your traveller. Life is short, and if you lose your way on the path (like I have) it might take lifetimes to get back there.

Eventually old age, sickness and death takes over the narrative........

Very insightful.

 

The traveler, through his 'white knight' conditioned state is experiencing the fruits of his own kharma.

He is in a catch 22 situation which, either way, ensures suffering.

 

He either continues to support the needy beneficiary at his lifes expense, or he abandons the beneficiary and suffers the mental anguish of such a path.

 

What is the answer?

 

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