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Teaching in Thailand as an older Teacher

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Just wondering as someone approaching 50 what the landscape is for teaching in Thailand. I've read quite a few older threads which suggest that it's difficult getting a job if you're over 50. 

 

Also that the mandatory retirement age in government schools is 60.

 

 

Mulling over whether there is any benefit at my age of getting a PGCE and QTS in England if my shelf life in Thailand is short.  Should I be aiming at primary or secondary school? 

 

One obvious advantage is that I would have the option of teaching in England until the retirement age there of 68.

 

All thoughts welcome.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

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I've already done some teaching in Thailand and also had some work experience in a primary school in England which I enjoyed very much compared to office work.

 

Teaching is something I actually enjoy. I don't see it as a way of earning a lot of money as I could continue as an accountant but I'm not interested in that. Having said that I want to work for good schools with decent pay.

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32 minutes ago, BobbyL said:

I would definitely recommend getting the PGCE and QTS if you can. However, not doing the NQT year or RQT year will restrict you from certain international schools as many do not hire fresh NQTs.

 

I am also not sure whether it is that easy to get on the PGCE courses at certain ages. I did mine when I was 25. Perhaps you might consider doing the PGCEi, but that would limit you to the lower level international schools where it will probably only be salary and no benefits. 

 

Teaching in international schools is literally incomparable to TEFL teaching. Work environment, students, fellow staff, salary, benefits, the day to day teaching etc are all generally great. People who have only worked in the Thai education system really cannot comprehend the differences of working in a western managed and English speaking school. You would really struggle to find any teacher in a 'real' international school in Bangkok that hated it. They are fantastic places to work. 

 

I would also say that age isn't a factor in international schools. We have about 80 staff across primary and secondary and a good number of them are easily over 50. It seems what I hear from TEFL teachers is that all these language schools or Thai schools want to churn out young and inexperienced teachers each year to impress the parents. That isn't the case at all in international schools where skills and experience is what generally counts and they are ran very similarly to a school in the UK. 

Thanks BobbyL good to hear.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

You can lie about your age if you want to, but your birth date is on your passport.

Edited by allane
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6 hours ago, Denim said:

 

Tell me about it. I used to work at the AUA Rajdamri 30 years ago.

 

3.00 pm straight through to 9.00 pm . 6 x 1 hour classes with no break in between except the 5 minutes as one lot trooped out and the next lot came in.  Non air con classroom and chalk boards in the hot season. Man , it was tough and completely mentally exhausting. Used to ride home , light one up and then just veg out in front of a TV with a beer totally incapable of holding a conversation.

And the traffic before the sky strain! 

 

It took me 4 hours to get home on a Friday from The Shangri La hotel to Ramkhamhaeng. 

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Posted (edited)

Why not teach online?  I used to teach Science and ESL in Burma and Laos, (both with a 100,000+ baht salary), but decided at 60 years old to change to teaching 'online' from my rented house in Laos.  I teach  elementary grade science 3 hours in the morning, 3 hours in the early evening, and collect more than my 'bricks & mortar' salary of previous years.... 🙂 

 

Oh, I have a science MSc, but no education degree and no QTS...

Edited by simon43
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What is your current education level? If you have a master's degree you may be able to work in one of the universities. Technically 60 is still the retirement age, but this option would save you the time and years of getting a proper teaching qualification. The staff and students are more mature at this level, you teach fewer hours, and you may just end up with class sizes where you can actually help the students improve.

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