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Eastern drought to be eased by 36km water pipeline

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Eastern drought to be eased by 36km water pipeline

By THE NATION

 

800_750934a80d45dd3.jpg?v=1588858355

 

The Office of National Water Resources (ONWR) will oversee construction of a 36-kilometre network of pipes to ease drought in Thailand’s eastern provinces, especially the Eastern Economic Corridor (EEC) spanning Rayong, Chonburi and Chachoengsao, ONWR secretary-general Somkiat Prachamwong announced on Thursday (May 7).

 

The project is a collaboration between the Industrial Estate Authority of Thailand, East Water, the Royal Irrigation Department, Provincial Waterworks Authority, and general citizens, he added.

 

The 36.2km-long EEC water pipe network will be divided into three sections.

 

The first will run from Phan Thong water treatment plant to Phan Thong water station (10.5km) in Chonburi, the second from the station to the water booster-pressure station (9.8km), and the third from the booster station to the Well Grow Industrial Estate (15.9km) in Bang Pakong District, Chachoengsao.

 

Pipe-laying for the network will be finished by the end of this June, Somkiat said.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30387465

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2020-05-08
 
 
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Well, that won't do us down here the slightest bit of good. 

Phan Thong is a district north of Chon Buri city. Bang Pakong is the district to the West of Phan Thong, that straddles the Bang Pakong river (that you may notice every time you cross it going to/from the airport).

The industrial park this is meant to supply sits near the border of Chachoengsao and Samut Prakan. 

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1 hour ago, Kerryd said:

Well, that won't do us down here the slightest bit of good. 

It won't do anything for anyone except for businesses in the Industrial park. 36km is nothing in the grand scheme of water works. 

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so lay a pipe to solve drought

 

maybe a few more reservoirs would be a good idea to  catch more water when it rains 

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What will that help when the reservoirs in eastern seaboard are all empty?

 

What they need is more reservoirs, rainwater catchment systems and more water treatment plants. The rains now flow into the sea.

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3 hours ago, longball53098 said:

I am far from an expert but that photo is a sewer pipe and box not a water pipe IMHO

19 minutes ago, johng said:

Where do you think the water is coming from  😋


Well, the article said the water would be coming from a "water treatment plant" so I translated that to Thai and searched the Pan Thong district and found 1 "water treatment plant", located close to a "waste water treatment plant". I also saw 2 "sewage treatment plants" further away.

For the first, I note on their website: "The company manages water resources for production and distribution of tap water, raw water and maintains central treatment systems for entrepreneurs"  (in various industrial estates).

In the next paragraph it notes: "Therefore has a policy of bringing waste water after being treated Used to water the plants for the green areas of both industrial estates."


Remind me not to drink the water at any "industrial estate" in the future !

Sure hope none of those water delivery places are set up in any industrial estates or get their water from a similar source !

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Kerryd said:

Remind me not to drink the water at any "industrial estate" in the future !

If done properly, not a problem at all, properly treated sewage water is quite clean. However the "last mile" pipes inside buildings can be horrible. The stuff that came out of our house pipes when I chlorine shocked and flushed the system was the stuff of nightmares. 

 

https://www.npr.org/2011/08/16/139642271/why-cleaned-wastewater-stays-dirty-in-our-minds

 

Quote

You see, we are all already basically drinking water that has at one point been sewage. After all, "we are all downstream from someone else," as Nemeroff says. "And even the nice fresh pure spring water? Birds and fish poop in it. So there is no water that has not been pooped in somewhere."

 

Better drink beer.

Edited by DrTuner

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46 minutes ago, DrTuner said:

Better drink beer.


Or whiskey. Distilled and aged so nothing can survive in it !

When I was in Afghanistan the first time ('03-'05) we had our own Waste Water treatment plant. The filter elements for that place were a quarter of a million each (and there were 4 of them). 
By the time the "waste" had been broken down by the bacteria, the "water" siphoned off, run through the filters and out the other end, it was technically "pure" and could have easily been drunk with no problem.
Except in the minds of those drinking it of course. (Reminds me of what the people on the Space Station are drinking.)

We used the end product for washing vehicles and the Fire Department's tanks. Excess went into a drainage ditch.

However, when I was in Kandahar ('06-'14) we were in charge of the waste treatment facility that was already there. "Poo pond" it was "affectionately" called (and something of a legend amongst the people that spent time there). Poo pond was the original waste treatment plant located far away from the Kandahar International Airport when it was first built. Even when I got there in 2006 it was still almost on the outer boundary of the camp. By the time I left, it was almost in the center of the place as everything expanded up around it. 

We had 3 sets of standards that we had to maintain when it came to that facility. American, European and Canadian. Whichever standard was the highest for a given metric.
But for the "Poo Pond" - the effluent only had to be "70% pure" when it was released into the drainage ditch !!

Part of that was due to the pond being overloaded. It was built to handle 6-8,000 people max, but we had in excess of 20,000 for years. Plus all the grease and waste cooking oil from the kitchens was dumped in there and the laundry contractor was set up on one edge of the pond so all their dirty water was going into the pond as well.
That's why the contracting agency (NAMSA) had to amend the standards for what was being released into the drainage. If they didn't, the pond would have been overflowing into the camp continuously.

The outflow from that pond drained off camp and into an area of farmer's fields. The local Afghan farmers planted a lot of crops right along the outflow creek and, not surprisingly, they grew very nicely (and I never ate fresh corn in the dining facilities again) !

With the pipeline mentioned in the OP though, if they are taking "recycled" water from that treatment plant mentioned previously and using it for things like "watering the grass", it would have the effect of reducing the demand on the "clean" water one would assume is already being piped into that area.

Also, in many "1st world" countries, the water that comes from assorted dams and reservoirs is usually treated before it hits the taps of the consumers. In addition to fluoride, some places add aluminium sulfate to the water supply to help purify it during the treatment process. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium_sulfate)

(So the diluted bird and fish poo isn't noticeable - so long as you don't think about it too much.) 

It was actually noted years ago in Canada that the water coming out of most people's taps was just as pure as the stuff they were paying outrageous prices for in plastic bottles. To make it even more laughable, it was found that at least one producer was (essentially) using the exact same tap water as was being piped into people's homes !

Mix it with some flavoured crystals or coffee or freeze it and drop it into your drink as ice and you'll never know the difference ! 

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17 minutes ago, Kerryd said:

Also, in many "1st world" countries, the water that comes from assorted dams and reservoirs is usually treated before it hits the taps of the consumers. In addition to fluoride, some places add aluminium sulfate to the water supply to help purify it during the treatment process. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium_sulfate)

(So the diluted bird and fish poo isn't noticeable - so long as you don't think about it too much.) 

It was actually noted years ago in Canada that the water coming out of most people's taps was just as pure as the stuff they were paying outrageous prices for in plastic bottles. To make it even more laughable, it was found that at least one producer was (essentially) using the exact same tap water as was being piped into people's homes !

Yes, bottled water used to be a rarity in Finland when I grew up there, everybody simply drank water straight from the tap. Still do. It's as pure as spring water (probably cleaner), thanks to the advanced water treatment systems they have. Thailand could easily get the tech from the Nordics if they wanted to, it's all available to buy and they'd be happy to do the projects too.

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1 minute ago, DrTuner said:

Yes, bottled water used to be a rarity in Finland when I grew up there, everybody simply drank water straight from the tap. Still do. It's as pure as spring water (probably cleaner), thanks to the advanced water treatment systems they have. Thailand could easily get the tech from the Nordics if they wanted to, it's all available to buy and they'd be happy to do the projects too.


The problem with the water here (as far as I know) isn't so much to do with the source or the treatment, but the delivery method from the plant to the home.

The quality of the piping and the work installing it (and maintaining it) leaves the water "suspect" by the time it gets to your tap. Not to mention if your water goes into a tank first to "stew" for awhile before it gets used. I'm sure a pre-med tech would cringe if they ever inspected some of the water tanks in peoples homes and buildings.)

Even in our camps in the 'stan, where we used our own wells to tap into the aquifier before putting the water through a number of filtering systems, we couldn't drink the water because they couldn't be certain as to the quality of the plumbing between the plant and (wherever). 

We had an extra filtering system to make "potable" water which was mainly for the kitchens. Our bottled drinking water used to be flown in by the US (the cost must have been staggering.)
We offered them a water bottling system like we'd used in Kabul but someone, somewhere, was making money on the deal to fly the water in from Dubai so they turned us down. Eventually they did contract one company to do it. I guess they made a better "offer" to the people doing the contracts.

Meh, I used the tap water in the coffee maker and turned out fine. (The coffee did, not sure about me.)

Here I use the tap water for washing and cleaning and the "bottled" water for cooking and drinking. Every so often, the water coming from the tap has a very swampy odour about it that makes me wonder where it's coming from !

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8 hours ago, Kerryd said:

The problem with the water here (as far as I know) isn't so much to do with the source or the treatment, but the delivery method from the plant to the home.

If the source runs out, you don't have to worry about treatment and delivery.  

 

They now have a problem with "source" so what do they do, rob Peter to pay Paul, and they will continue to do that until Peter has no more water left to rob, then what?  

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Seeing as the water will be coming from Phan Thong treatment plant, can we expect the odd Blind Brown Mullet  💩 to try and squeeze  😖 out of the taps ?  😱

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