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genericptr

When did Thais begin living in concrete houses?

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Does anyone happen to know the history of when Thais starting building and living in concrete houses? I'm assuming their traditional form of housing was the classic wooden design that will still see today and concrete was imported later in their history. I'd also be curious to know if people who have been here for decades used to see more wooden houses in the past.

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16 minutes ago, Denim said:

Back in 1979 when I visited rural villages almost every house was made of wood and was on posts. In the big towns though, a lot of the shops and townhouses were already made of brick and rendered.

 

Interesting thank you. I'm renting a little wooden house in the mountains as a weekend retreat and this got me thinking. I've seen some photos of Chiang Mai in the 70/80's and I still see wooden houses all throughout the city but also many poured concrete structures and brick.

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When stupid foreigners started buying them😀😀😀

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20 minutes ago, genericptr said:

Interesting thank you. I'm renting a little wooden house in the mountains as a weekend retreat and this got me thinking. I've seen some photos of Chiang Mai in the 70/80's and I still see wooden houses all throughout the city but also many poured concrete structures and brick.

In Old Sukhothai where Thais tribes came from the north and established their place in the Greater India lands to set up a Buddhist state there are buildings 800 years old or so built by Cambodians in rock and brick. 

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30 minutes ago, genericptr said:

I'm renting a little wooden house in the mountains as a weekend retreat and this got me thinking.

There are many houses being built around us built in the traditional Thai way with wood they cost a lot to construct.

 

One recently was just finnished end 2019 is it aesthetically a spectacular beautiful building in my eyes.

I believe it has been made a G/H.

 

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1 hour ago, genericptr said:

...and concrete was imported later in their history

Imported concrete?  That's a novel idea.

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34 minutes ago, Denim said:

 

I should add that the poorer house did not have walls made of wooden planks. Instead they had a kind of lattice work made of bamboo strips from floor to joist and big leaves were woven between the lattice work. As far as I remember most houses had roofs of sheeting ( sangasee ) usually brown from rust and dirt and very leaky. For lighting there would be an old can of condensed milk with some oil and a wick in it. To get to the village we took a pony and trap from the main road. I felt sorry for that horse as its neck and back were chaffed raw. I wanted to get out and walk but my distaff partner would have none of it.

 

The first village I went to was in Kalasin and they had never seen a white man in the flesh before. Half the women in the village turned out to prod me and have a feel of my hair. At night they went home and the men came for more of the same. The resident linguist asked me my name and where I came from about a thousand times ( the only English he knew ) until my bird got bored and kicked them all out. It was so cold during the night that in the morning there was a hoar frost for an hour after sunrise and frozen puddles. I nigh on froze to death ..................in Thailand of all places since I only had flimsy clothes with me. Like everyone else I was soon huddled around a fire drinking a chipped cup of hot water.

 

Never forget that trip. A real eye opener.

I have a large teakwood home build by the kumnan for himself. He was in the lumber business and only used recycled wood. The bottom floor is open but finished and tiled. Upstair is all double walled and air conditioned throughout. The only problem is that electric wire are sometimes bad and cause fires. We had our electrician rewire everything with  proper grounding last year. He told me that the main cause for fires is faulty wiring. 

 

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Apart from grand residences, I suspect that such houses started with traditional shop house architecture.  It started as a Sino-Portuguese thing in the early- to mid-1800s.  Phuket in particular is noted for such constructions.

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The three different houses I rented from 1977-1980 were all wooden.  One was on stilts.  Two had the bathroom outside the house.

 

I think this is the noodle shop I used to eat at back then.  Still there as far as I know.  There are many other wooden buildings still around.

 

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Here, in the South, most along the coast, wooden houses were replaced by brick:

-first after the Tropical Storm HARRIET in 1962.

-second after the Typhoon GAY in 1989

Most all wooden houses along the cost, even several km inside the country had been destroyed and were rebuild in brick build houses.

 

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