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How Many Expats Have a Masters Degree and/or PhD (they are not using)

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5 minutes ago, Neeranam said:

If you search a bit, you'll find it could be very useful. There are many global companies around Bangkok.

I must be looking in the wrong places. Though I'm not looking for work, it would be nice to know there are options should my position change in the future. 

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I recommend to anyone looking for serious secondary level teaching in Thailand, which unfortunately is at private or international schools, to have at least a Master's, preferably in education.

 

Of course, this isn't required at this level. But it definitely gets you a leg up over the thousands of other expats showing up to teach with just their Bachelor's. It also proves to these schools you're more likely to be of the caliber they're looking for, rather than the majority looking to play Hangman for a few hours, then pick up their paycheck to go party.

 

Also, such a degree aids in getting your 5 year "permanent" teaching license, rather than the 2 year waiver others must keep getting.

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Master Home Economics from Agriculture University Wageningen, The Netherlands. Degree in teaching home economics and health science.

I could help to get more insight in financial problems in the ordinary Thai household. Manage income, budgetting, debts on credit cards, insurance, mortgages, saving, etc. Learn them cook, clean, wash and iron. Teach them about hygiene, medicines, healthy lifestyle, etc. It sounds not important, but it would help significant in day to day life for the blue collar working class.

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Live in Bangkok, but fully employed remotely by a Japanese company, which is more than happy to leverage my skills and experience.

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I have an MA in Education from the UK. I don't really need it to teach in an international school here as I already have the PGCE + QTS. The only benefit I get from it is a slight increase on the school salary scale and it looks good on the CV when applying for leadership positions. I would say only 1 module out of the 6 I did were truly interesting and beneficial to my day to day teaching. 

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34 minutes ago, Neeranam said:

He said that he didn't think I would stay. Shortly after, the newspaper closed. 

I have been in that situation!  It is a strange feeling to be  told you are "over qualified".

 

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5 minutes ago, norfolkandchance said:

Well I’m glad I’m not clever. I wouldn’t get out of bed for 10000 baht.

Why? It was a lot of money in 1990.

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Research scientist, chemistry background. Process troubleshooter. Could still teach it if I was wanted, but I'm not.

I don't know what is needed to get a Masters or Ph.D. here, but I'd say problem-solving, correct use of statistics, and thinking outside the square are not part of the Thai education system.

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