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How Many Expats Have a Masters Degree and/or PhD (they are not using)


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Why would I want to help Thais?

Just wondering how many TV Members, located in Thailand,  hold an advanced degree from a western University, in whatever subject,  and that they are not using here.  Was it needed for your career, or

I doubt anyone in Thailand would be interested in the Masters degrees that my husband and I got over forty years ago.    A few years ago, my husband got roped into helping "polish" the Engli

37 minutes ago, Baerboxer said:

Several of my daughter's classmates' parents encourage their children to speak with me to practice their English. The result is they all avoid me like the plague! They say my accent is 'too British" and they're not used to that 

Probably just an excuse. 

My daughters' friends don't want to learn with a 50 year old father. 

Fine with me, I hate teaching teenage kids. 

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2 minutes ago, mcl2504 said:

I have 3 masters degrees and have worked in academic publishing for more than 20 years. I can't find a job teaching ESL despite having TESL certificate--not even an interview

Do you have a beard? 

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I have a PhD from UC Berkeley in English, concentrating on the English Renaissance and Shakespeare, and later gained some expertise in modern and contemporary American lit.

I taught 10 years in the midwest, then left academia and hardly looked back. Sometimes I think I would like to try it again, but I'm 80 tho in good health, and I try to travel to Europe all the time: in 5 years I had to do only one 90 day report. And I don't need the money, thank you.

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23 hours ago, SteveK said:

I would love to be able to help out teaching English, as I know that the local English teacher in my village is useless. I don't care too much about the salary as I don't have much in the way of outgoings, but obviously the red tape is horrendous.

 

A little bit of pocket money, a chance to meet some new people and improve my Thai whilst hopefully making a significant improvement to the school's English lessons. Everyone wins, but it's just a nightmare to do and stay 100% above board (no way would I risk working without everything in place).

Taught for a local school for a couple for years. Didn't had to do a single thing and everything was taken care for. 

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I have a Bachelor from a top 10 Uni in the States.

 

Degree's matter a lot less these days. I have never been asked for any form of degree and it's completely useless in my line of work. 

 

IMHO a degree is a waste of money. The key to success is specialization. Pick a craft, stick to it, work hard on it and become a master in it. 

 

 

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23 hours ago, BritManToo said:

Why would I want to help Thais?

 

Exactly ! These proud people who know nothing and are happy this way do not need help.

I already spend my money for them, it's more than enough.

Ill keep my phd secret 🙂

 

 

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3 minutes ago, salsajapan said:

These proud people who know nothing and are happy this way do not need help.

We think they know fcek nothing. But in fact they know fcek all.

Edited by VocalNeal
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1 hour ago, Mavideol said:

it's reciprocal !!!!! because they help you by letting  you enjoy their land/country and their females 555

So, whenever you're on holiday you get the urge to help the locals?

If you holidayed in Cleethorpes would you have the same urge?

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22 hours ago, BangkokReady said:

Sadly, for any qualified and experienced expat to be able to make a reasonable contribution to Thai society, Thais would have to admit something that they never will...

 

It's a real shame.  Obviously it doesn't apply to everyone, but there must be many expats here that have superior education and work experience to average Thais and are a completely wasted resource.

 

An evening or weekend class once a week.  Wouldn't be hard to set up.  Probably a lot of people would volunteer to do it for free.

No is not a shame if you speaking with retired, I personally am retired and I see no reason to end my life in an office with the air conditioner at 20 ° C instead of looking at the beautiful view of girls strayed on the beach and enjoying my life as a retired, the life is too short.

 

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Have an MSc in freshwater biology and water management But i was retired when i came here and was not very interested in working 9-5.

Did toy with the idea of setting up a small consultancy, but the language issue and the bureaucracy here soon ended any further thoughts!

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2 hours ago, Neeranam said:

You are a guest if you want to be, you can be a permanent resident if you want to be. You can even be a citizen if you want.

 

I chose to be a guest in Thailand, because I understood very soon that it is the best way to live in Thailand as my education never adapts to the Thai mentality and I never claim to be a Thai. I am a tourist for 365 dd

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On 6/1/2020 at 1:22 PM, BritManToo said:

Why would I want to help Thais?

Apart from their road behaviour, I have nothing against the Thais, but I certainly have no time for the Thai government.

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3 hours ago, alien365 said:

I wish I had been taught the same way. Moving internationally, away from my small town environment in the UK has highlighted how useful a master's would be and how many people have them. I am considering doing one now. One that I could use; hence, my potentially off topic response to this thread.

Its never too ;late.  I was awarded my DBA at the age of 59 

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2 hours ago, Neeranam said:

You are a guest if you want to be, you can be a permanent resident if you want to be. You can even be a citizen if you want.

I really cant agree that working and living in Thailand isn't a motivation to learn Thai. Learning Thai gives you freedom and opens many doors, such as quality private gigs, translation work etc. If you want to network, of course you need to speak the language, but some prefer to be employees all their life. 

all true, but I am just a temporary resident, most probably only on an extended holiday and I am basically retired.  Having a Thai wife for 23 years, I have obviously picked up enough Thai to get by, but its not a language that I need in my everyday life.  I did make an effort to learn some Mandarin when I worked among the Chinese in Taiwan, but that was a clear professional need and its a language spoken by 7 billion people, not circa 70 million, so a bit more practical.  

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2 hours ago, Neeranam said:

You are a guest if you want to be, you can be a permanent resident if you want to be. You can even be a citizen if you want.

I really cant agree that working and living in Thailand isn't a motivation to learn Thai. Learning Thai gives you freedom and opens many doors, such as quality private gigs, translation work etc. If you want to network, of course you need to speak the language, but some prefer to be employees all their life. 

You're talking about poor people again, most of us are fully funded until we die.

Having to desperately scrabble around for next months accommodation payment may be you, but it isn't us.

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I purposely visited Thailand four times over 2009 & 2010 (month each visit) in anticipation of retiring here in 2011. During the visits I visited the universities in Chiang ?Mai thinking I might continue some degree of teaching. If they did not use me in American and European general history, well maybe I could help with native English language instruction. Fortunately or unfortunately I found after retiring that I am rather at ease continuing my reading in gainful retirement. The 3 piece suits, ties, dress shirts ... I gave to a Chiang Mai social services sometime ago. My M.A. + (36 hours of study after the Masters ... History and Education), the International study in 7 countries, introductory study in 6 languages (I speak only my native English ... but can be handy in ordering wine, the please and thank yous). Lifetime Teaching Certification granted by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. At 73 I do not count this as a waste as the background gives me a rather broad and unique background in observing and having some understanding of what is going on in the world. I suppose some could point and say ... see, see, give someone a retirement income and they will no longer be motivated to work. 555 I figure after 41 years in education ... I paid my dues.

Edited by wwest5829
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No degree, but have been an Electrician for 50 years, Electrical contractor. electronics and refrigeration air conditioning since 1986, would be only too happy to help out if they wanted the assistance.

From what I've seen it is badly needed.

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I have a Bachelor of Science degree. I have worked in the manufacturing sector my entire life, primarily semiconductor and optical industry. I retired early here in Thailand but during my early retirement I have accepted 3 jobs working directly for US companies. I still call it being retired because its all on my terms. This has been rewarding in that I have been able to mentor Thai engineers and operations people while working. I have always felt and witnessed the best education is the hands on real world.  I found looking back that college was a basic start but what you learn out in the work place is far more educational and experience is everything. So while I am not sitting in a class room, I am and have been teaching Engineers at the factory and its all on my terms which makes it quite enjoyable. The plus for them as well, they learn US business methods and more English.

 

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3 hours ago, ICELANDMAN said:

I chose to be a guest in Thailand, because I understood very soon that it is the best way to live in Thailand as my education never adapts to the Thai mentality and I never claim to be a Thai. I am a tourist for 365 dd

Do you work here? Maybe you don't have the other options.

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2 hours ago, BritManToo said:

You're talking about poor people again, most of us are fully funded until we die.

Having to desperately scrabble around for next months accommodation payment may be you, but it isn't us.

I've no idea what you are talking about. 

Do you have a Masters or a PhD?

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2 hours ago, Pilotman said:

Having a Thai wife for 23 years, I have obviously picked up enough Thai to get by

It helps, although I had a friend who had been in Thailand for 30 years and needed me to tell his wife's driver to turn left! He had the Order of the White Elephant 5 level, ex CIA, spoke 7 languages but couldn't learn Thai.  

I'd hate to have to take my wife along with me to do things, especially like buying a new car, God forbid! 

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1 hour ago, Neeranam said:

It helps, although I had a friend who had been in Thailand for 30 years and needed me to tell his wife's driver to turn left! He had the Order of the White Elephant 5 level, ex CIA, spoke 7 languages but couldn't learn Thai.  

I'd hate to have to take my wife along with me to do things, especially like buying a new car, God forbid! 

I can't recall one occasion when I have had to take my wife anywhere to speak Thai on my behalf. She does deal with the utility people, on the rare occasions when we need to speak to them,  and with the gardener and jobbing builder, as they have no English at all, but that is more convenience than necessity. She has never been to Immigration with me, and when we bought the car, I did all the talking and if the sales people had been unable to cope with that, we would have  gone elsewhere. I sort out the licence for the car and myself, the houses and car insurance and the bank accounts,  I do all the travel arranging and reservations. Thai is never needed.  I really see no need to learn the language,  past the basics that I have.    

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Two bachelor's degrees (one in Physics and one in Industrial Design), PhD (Physics) and MBA.

For quite a few years I worked for the UK government - technology-related work. Pay was never great but I travelled the world and had a pretty stress-free career compared to many folks. Its how I got to know Thailand. Made many friends and contacts around the world.  Always been interested in languages and linguistics. Learned French and German when young. Spanish after a fashion. Thai and Mandarin. Passable Malay and Vietnamese. I have a hobby interest in the history and evolution of the Northwest Semitic languages (Hebrew, Phoenician etc). I can just about hold a conversation in Assyrian Neo-Aramaic.

Took early retirement a few years back. Last year I did some consultancy work for the Thai government - pay was good enough and it was with people I've known for quite a few years. However as I approach 60 I feel 'time running out' and just want to relax and enjoy myself, so no more work of any kind I think.....

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I think you are always using your education/ knowledge. I have an MBA and, while not working for a company, I use what I learned in many ways. But specifically for a job, no.

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On 6/2/2020 at 12:18 PM, KhunFred said:

How can your accent be "too British"?  I am American and a British accent would seem to be the standard for spoken English, in my view. Who makes these stupid rules?? You are spot-on about the ageism here. At seventy, some form of teaching is probably ALL I could do, but Thai culture considers me a vegetable. 😄😄😄

 

It's a convenient excuse! But I also think they're used to the pidgin English spoken by so many teachers.

 

Has for accents, mine is a tad distinctive! BBC British English used to be the Queen's English with perfect pronunciation, a la private schools. Now it's quite regional too. 

 

I find a really wide variety in American accents too. Some great ones.

 

 

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On 6/2/2020 at 12:38 PM, Neeranam said:

Probably just an excuse. 

My daughters' friends don't want to learn with a 50 year old father. 

Fine with me, I hate teaching teenage kids. 

 

Indeed. My daughter says they 'find me scary" 555! Not sure what she tells them! 

 

Apparently it's because I don't like being messed about. 

 

I was fine lecturing adults, but really have no skill or desire to teach teenage children, Respect for those that do well.

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I have an advanced degree in sociology from the University of Life.  My " CV"  is a lengthy one , having moved home more than 15 times and creating small businesses that enabled me to be independent.   

I have a minor in creative writing , and putting these two degrees to questionable use on websites such as this I have been able to present my unique insights with humor, sarcasm,

and occasionally some opinions which garner me some strange things called  emojis.

Besides giving me something to pass the time I also enjoy the frequent "vacations" .

As for being much use in life ( not just Thailand)..... I have learnt that sarcasm, insights, and experience are of little use to almost everyone.  C'est la vie.   

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