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Pilotman

How Many Expats Have a Masters Degree and/or PhD (they are not using)

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2 hours ago, Neeranam said:

You are a guest if you want to be, you can be a permanent resident if you want to be. You can even be a citizen if you want.

I really cant agree that working and living in Thailand isn't a motivation to learn Thai. Learning Thai gives you freedom and opens many doors, such as quality private gigs, translation work etc. If you want to network, of course you need to speak the language, but some prefer to be employees all their life. 

all true, but I am just a temporary resident, most probably only on an extended holiday and I am basically retired.  Having a Thai wife for 23 years, I have obviously picked up enough Thai to get by, but its not a language that I need in my everyday life.  I did make an effort to learn some Mandarin when I worked among the Chinese in Taiwan, but that was a clear professional need and its a language spoken by 7 billion people, not circa 70 million, so a bit more practical.  

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2 hours ago, Neeranam said:

You are a guest if you want to be, you can be a permanent resident if you want to be. You can even be a citizen if you want.

I really cant agree that working and living in Thailand isn't a motivation to learn Thai. Learning Thai gives you freedom and opens many doors, such as quality private gigs, translation work etc. If you want to network, of course you need to speak the language, but some prefer to be employees all their life. 

You're talking about poor people again, most of us are fully funded until we die.

Having to desperately scrabble around for next months accommodation payment may be you, but it isn't us.

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Posted (edited)

I purposely visited Thailand four times over 2009 & 2010 (month each visit) in anticipation of retiring here in 2011. During the visits I visited the universities in Chiang ?Mai thinking I might continue some degree of teaching. If they did not use me in American and European general history, well maybe I could help with native English language instruction. Fortunately or unfortunately I found after retiring that I am rather at ease continuing my reading in gainful retirement. The 3 piece suits, ties, dress shirts ... I gave to a Chiang Mai social services sometime ago. My M.A. + (36 hours of study after the Masters ... History and Education), the International study in 7 countries, introductory study in 6 languages (I speak only my native English ... but can be handy in ordering wine, the please and thank yous). Lifetime Teaching Certification granted by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. At 73 I do not count this as a waste as the background gives me a rather broad and unique background in observing and having some understanding of what is going on in the world. I suppose some could point and say ... see, see, give someone a retirement income and they will no longer be motivated to work. 555 I figure after 41 years in education ... I paid my dues.

Edited by wwest5829
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I have a MS in Bio. Used it to do some research here. Also helps me get promoted, but I work for my government.

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No degree, but have been an Electrician for 50 years, Electrical contractor. electronics and refrigeration air conditioning since 1986, would be only too happy to help out if they wanted the assistance.

From what I've seen it is badly needed.

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I have a Bachelor of Science degree. I have worked in the manufacturing sector my entire life, primarily semiconductor and optical industry. I retired early here in Thailand but during my early retirement I have accepted 3 jobs working directly for US companies. I still call it being retired because its all on my terms. This has been rewarding in that I have been able to mentor Thai engineers and operations people while working. I have always felt and witnessed the best education is the hands on real world.  I found looking back that college was a basic start but what you learn out in the work place is far more educational and experience is everything. So while I am not sitting in a class room, I am and have been teaching Engineers at the factory and its all on my terms which makes it quite enjoyable. The plus for them as well, they learn US business methods and more English.

 

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3 hours ago, ICELANDMAN said:

I chose to be a guest in Thailand, because I understood very soon that it is the best way to live in Thailand as my education never adapts to the Thai mentality and I never claim to be a Thai. I am a tourist for 365 dd

Do you work here? Maybe you don't have the other options.

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2 hours ago, BritManToo said:

You're talking about poor people again, most of us are fully funded until we die.

Having to desperately scrabble around for next months accommodation payment may be you, but it isn't us.

I've no idea what you are talking about. 

Do you have a Masters or a PhD?

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Pilotman said:

Having a Thai wife for 23 years, I have obviously picked up enough Thai to get by

It helps, although I had a friend who had been in Thailand for 30 years and needed me to tell his wife's driver to turn left! He had the Order of the White Elephant 5 level, ex CIA, spoke 7 languages but couldn't learn Thai.  

I'd hate to have to take my wife along with me to do things, especially like buying a new car, God forbid! 

Edited by Neeranam

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1 hour ago, Neeranam said:

It helps, although I had a friend who had been in Thailand for 30 years and needed me to tell his wife's driver to turn left! He had the Order of the White Elephant 5 level, ex CIA, spoke 7 languages but couldn't learn Thai.  

I'd hate to have to take my wife along with me to do things, especially like buying a new car, God forbid! 

I can't recall one occasion when I have had to take my wife anywhere to speak Thai on my behalf. She does deal with the utility people, on the rare occasions when we need to speak to them,  and with the gardener and jobbing builder, as they have no English at all, but that is more convenience than necessity. She has never been to Immigration with me, and when we bought the car, I did all the talking and if the sales people had been unable to cope with that, we would have  gone elsewhere. I sort out the licence for the car and myself, the houses and car insurance and the bank accounts,  I do all the travel arranging and reservations. Thai is never needed.  I really see no need to learn the language,  past the basics that I have.    

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Two bachelor's degrees (one in Physics and one in Industrial Design), PhD (Physics) and MBA.

For quite a few years I worked for the UK government - technology-related work. Pay was never great but I travelled the world and had a pretty stress-free career compared to many folks. Its how I got to know Thailand. Made many friends and contacts around the world.  Always been interested in languages and linguistics. Learned French and German when young. Spanish after a fashion. Thai and Mandarin. Passable Malay and Vietnamese. I have a hobby interest in the history and evolution of the Northwest Semitic languages (Hebrew, Phoenician etc). I can just about hold a conversation in Assyrian Neo-Aramaic.

Took early retirement a few years back. Last year I did some consultancy work for the Thai government - pay was good enough and it was with people I've known for quite a few years. However as I approach 60 I feel 'time running out' and just want to relax and enjoy myself, so no more work of any kind I think.....

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I think you are always using your education/ knowledge. I have an MBA and, while not working for a company, I use what I learned in many ways. But specifically for a job, no.

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On 6/2/2020 at 12:18 PM, KhunFred said:

How can your accent be "too British"?  I am American and a British accent would seem to be the standard for spoken English, in my view. Who makes these stupid rules?? You are spot-on about the ageism here. At seventy, some form of teaching is probably ALL I could do, but Thai culture considers me a vegetable. 😄😄😄

 

It's a convenient excuse! But I also think they're used to the pidgin English spoken by so many teachers.

 

Has for accents, mine is a tad distinctive! BBC British English used to be the Queen's English with perfect pronunciation, a la private schools. Now it's quite regional too. 

 

I find a really wide variety in American accents too. Some great ones.

 

 

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On 6/2/2020 at 12:38 PM, Neeranam said:

Probably just an excuse. 

My daughters' friends don't want to learn with a 50 year old father. 

Fine with me, I hate teaching teenage kids. 

 

Indeed. My daughter says they 'find me scary" 555! Not sure what she tells them! 

 

Apparently it's because I don't like being messed about. 

 

I was fine lecturing adults, but really have no skill or desire to teach teenage children, Respect for those that do well.

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I have an advanced degree in sociology from the University of Life.  My " CV"  is a lengthy one , having moved home more than 15 times and creating small businesses that enabled me to be independent.   

I have a minor in creative writing , and putting these two degrees to questionable use on websites such as this I have been able to present my unique insights with humor, sarcasm,

and occasionally some opinions which garner me some strange things called  emojis.

Besides giving me something to pass the time I also enjoy the frequent "vacations" .

As for being much use in life ( not just Thailand)..... I have learnt that sarcasm, insights, and experience are of little use to almost everyone.  C'est la vie.   

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