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Public Health Perm-Sec threatened with a malfeasance lawsuit

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Public Health Perm-Sec threatened with a malfeasance lawsuit

 

Sukum-Kanjanapimai.jpg

 

The Khon Kaen Provincial Hospital Director has threatened to sue Public Health Permanent Secretary, Dr. Sukhum Kanchanapimai, after he was transferred to Chanthaburi province over alleged corruption in connection with donations to the Hospital Development Fund.

 

Speaking to the media, in front of his medical staff at Khon Kaen Hospital at noon today (Thursday), Dr. Charnchai Chanvorachaikul categorically denied the graft allegation, which was the subject of an anonymous letter sent to the permanent secretary.

 

He said that all the public donations to, and spending of the hospital development fund, including the 143 million baht raised by famous rocker Toon Body Slam, were accountable and approved by the hospital’s board and they can be checked any time.

 

Full story: https://www.thaipbsworld.com/public-health-perm-sec-threatened-with-a-malfeasance-lawsuit/

 

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45 minutes ago, Thaiwrath said:

Given his position of authority, I would imagine him as being as corrupt as other people in similar positions. 

You may be right, but I have met (albeit only a few) regional doctors in senior positions who actually do take their medical obligations seriously.

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Posted (edited)

Regarding the 5% commission granted by drug companies to hospitals for drug procurement, Dr. Charnchai said that, two years ago, the Cabinet issued an order forbidding all hospitals to receive any commission from pharmaceutical companies.

 

I don't understand that at all, unless those commissions went to individual pockets as opposed to the hospitals.  Hospital pharmacies buy drugs, mark them up and sell them to patients.  Why would they call it a commission as opposed to a 5% discount?

 

I suspect we all know the answer...

 

Edited by impulse

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1 hour ago, impulse said:

Regarding the 5% commission granted by drug companies to hospitals for drug procurement, Dr. Charnchai said that, two years ago, the Cabinet issued an order forbidding all hospitals to receive any commission from pharmaceutical companies.

 

I don't understand that at all, unless those commissions went to individual pockets as opposed to the hospitals.  Hospital pharmacies buy drugs, mark them up and sell them to patients.  Why would they call it a commission as opposed to a 5% discount?

 

I suspect we all know the answer...

 

Discount means it goes straight of the price. Commission means you pay full price and later get a refund that goes to those prescribing not the hospital itself.

 

The latter is of course bad and would influence Dr's to prescribe drugs they get the most commission from instead of the cheaper alternatives. Having said that, if the markup of a drug is in a percentage of the original price then they automatically make more on expensive drugs then cheap ones. 

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maybe in 2099 thailand might form a committee to see if or when they should stop corruption

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3 hours ago, robblok said:

Discount means it goes straight of the price. Commission means you pay full price and later get a refund that goes to those prescribing not the hospital itself.

 

The latter is of course bad and would influence Dr's to prescribe drugs they get the most commission from instead of the cheaper alternatives. Having said that, if the markup of a drug is in a percentage of the original price then they automatically make more on expensive drugs then cheap ones. 

 

That's a new one for me.  We call that a rebate.  Commission denotes a payment for some kind of effort on the sales end.

 

That said, I'm using American English, and I do realize that there are different versions of English spoken and written around the world.

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2 minutes ago, impulse said:

 

That's a new one for me.  We call that a rebate.  Commission denotes a payment for some kind of effort on the sales end.

 

That said, I'm using American English, and I do realize that there are different versions of English spoken and written around the world.

Im Dutch but i think we are basically saying the same thing. Commission would go to the doctor not back to the hospital. (IMHO that is totally wrong to give doctors a commission it would lead to overperscribing and selecting a drug based on reward not on what is good for the patient)

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I'm English and a commission is something paid to someone for a service rendered, based on the value of that service, normally a percentage of the value of the service. Usually to an agent in a commercial transaction. Someone sells something and the purchaser pays for it. The vendor pays the seller a percentage of the purchase price of an agreed sum.

A rebate is a sum paid back for an overpayment. I.e. Tax rebate. An amount credited to a payer of tax that is in excess of that required.

A discount is an amount the vendor reduces the recommended retail or wholesale price. 

 

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